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Thread: That ship

  1. #1
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    Default That ship

    A notice from the site brought back the mystery of the 'Virtual Ship'.
    I thought she had sunk some years back just of the coast of Utopia, could be wrong there.

    Could she be refloated one wonders and maybe find some new crew for her?

    She was a good fun ship with some great crew on her, wonder where some are now?
    Happy daze John in Oz.

    Life is too short to blend in.

    John Strange R737787
    World Traveller

  2. Likes j.sabourn, Graham Shaw, Doc Vernon liked this post
  3. #2
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    Wink Re: That ship

    Quote Originally Posted by happy daze john in oz View Post
    A notice from the site brought back the mystery of the 'Virtual Ship'.
    I thought she had sunk some years back just of the coast of Utopia, could be wrong there.

    Could she be refloated one wonders and maybe find some new crew for her?

    She was a good fun ship with some great crew on her, wonder where some are now?
    Yes,it was all good fun.Many have' crossed the bar 'since that ignominious fun-filled rum bum and baccy maiden voyage back in 2008 where,if I recall,the m.v.Virtuality set sail from somewhere on the Thames, a stroppy Captain insisting that we were ready to sail,but the Chief Engineer expostulating that the engines weren't ready,the Old Man insisting we must sail,and the inevitable retort from the Chief. "All right then Captain,you take your half,but we'll stay here !" I recall on departure the second mate forgot to let go ,and m.v Virtuality took a 200 foot length of dock frontage with her,resulting in a prohibition order from ever entering a Thames port again...till the next time. There were many pier head jumps,sudden returns to ports,cargo having to be shut out 'cos No.4 hatch was found to be loaded with Den's tabnabs;navigating the English Channel with Esso road maps,and a great crew of salty characters.
    In later years it seemed some lost their wicked sense of humour,probably the ageing process, or the beginnings of the politically correct 'woke'movement-like being horrified upon your vessel 's engines stopping in a seaway and hearing the Skipper saying ("Right lads,let's hoist the two black balls" and the last we heard she was exhaustedly lying on her side leaning against the quay in an obscure African port-it wasn't Ouagadougu,but something similar-they all sound the same don't they? Thankfully all the crew were ashore which was often the case, and which was probably the reason why she capsized in the first place......


    From our photo albums;Skipper.gifOur SKIPPER
    m.v.VIRTUALITY (2).jpgm.v.VIRTUALITYCadet Captain Les B Ann.gifOur Cadet Captain LES B.ANN
    Bar Girl.gifGLORIA aka GORDON
    -GP Crew (Greaser/ Bar Steward)
    Last edited by Graham Shaw; 25th May 2022 at 10:14 AM. Reason: Tarting up the text and captions

  4. #3
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    Red face Re: That ship

    ....Talking about calamities which befell our Virtuality (real or imagined!),here's another chance to reflect upon the woes of being a ship's Master


    The following report, from a ship's master, was printed in the August 1987 edition of The Log journal - its exact history is unclear.
    (Reproduced with permission.)



    It is with regret and haste that I write this letter to you, regret that such a small misunderstanding could lead to the following circumstances, and haste in order that you will get this report before you form your own pre-conceived opinions from reports in the world press, for I am sure that they will tend to overdramatise the affair.
    We had just picked up the pilot and the apprentice had returned from changing the 'G' flag for the 'H' and, it being his first trip, was having difficulty rolling the 'G' flag up, I therefore proceeded to show him how. Coming to the last part, I told him to "let go," the lad although willing is not too bright, necessitating my having to repeat the order in a sharper tone.
    At this moment the chief officer appeared from the chart room, having been plotting the vessel's progress and, thinking that it was the anchors that were being referred to, repeated the "let go" to the third officer on the fo'cstle. The port anchor having been cleared away but not walked out, was promptly let go. The effect of letting the anchor drop from the "pipe" while the vessel was proceeding at full harbour speed proved too much for the windlass brake, and the entire length of the port cable was pulled out "by the roots." I fear that the damage to the chain locker may be extensive. The braking effect of the port anchor naturally caused the vessel to sheer in that direction, right towards the swing bridge that spans the tributary to the river up which we were proceeding.
    The swing bridge operator showed great presence of mind by opening the bridge for my vessel. Unfortunately, he did not think to stop vehicular traffic, the result being that the bridge partly opened and deposited a Volkswagen, two cyclists, and a cattle truck on the foredeck. My ship's company are at present rounding up the contents of the latter, which from the noise I would say were pigs. In his efforts to stop the progress of the vessel, the third officer dropped the starboard anchor, too late to be of practical use, for it fell on the swing bridge operator's control cabin.
    After the port anchor was let go and the vessel started to sheer, I gave a double ring full astern on the engine room telegraph and personally rang the engine room to order maximum astern revolutions. I was informed that the sea temperature was 53 degrees and asked if there was a film tonight. My reply would not add constructively to this report.
    Up to now I have confined my report to the activities at the forward end of the vessel. Down aft they were having their own problems.
    At the moment the port anchor was let go, the second officer was supervising the making fast of the after tug and was lowering the ship's towing spring down onto the tug.
    The sudden braking effect on the port anchor caused the tug to run in under the stern of my vessel just at the moment when the propellers was answering my double ring full astern. The prompt action of the second officer in securing the inboard end of the towing spring delayed the sinking of the tug by some minutes, and thereby the safe abandoning of that vessel.
    It is strange but at the very same moment of letting go the port anchor there was a power cut ashore. The fact that we were passing over a cable area at that time might suggest we may have touched something on the river bed. It is perhaps lucky that the high tension cables brought down by the foremast were not live, possibly being replaced by the underwater cable, but owing to the shore blackout, it is impossible to say where the pylon fell.

    It never fails to amaze me the actions and behaviour of foreigners during moments of minor crisis. The pilot for instance is at this moment huddled in the corner of my day cabin alternately crooning to himself and crying after having consumed a bottle of gin in a time that is worthy of inclusion in the Guinness Book of Records.
    The tug captain on the other hand reacted violently and had to be forcibly restrained by the steward, who has him handcuffed in the ship's hospital, where he is telling me to do impossible things with my ship and my crew.
    I enclose the names and addresses of the drivers and insurance companies of the vehicles on my foredeck, which the third officer collected after his somewhat hurried evacuation of the fo'cstle. These particulars will enable us to claim for the damage that they did to the railing of the #1 hold.
    I am enclosing this preliminary report for I am finding it difficult to concentrate with the sound of police sirens and their flashing lights.
    It is sad to think that had the apprentice realised that there is no need to fly pilot flags after dark, none of this would have happened.
    For weekly accountability report I will assign the following casualty numbers T/750101 to T750119 inclusive.
    Yours truly
    Master
    Last edited by Graham Shaw; 25th May 2022 at 02:17 PM.

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