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Thread: Women crew members and wives at sea.

  1. #91
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    Default Re: Women crew members and wives at sea.

    Thank you very much Bill. By a local historian you say, Aberdeenshire then?

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  3. #92
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    Default Re: Women crew members and wives at sea.

    Marion, if you speak with Cappy I think you will find that is his Mary just before she got her wooden leg.
    Happy daze John in Oz.

    Life is too short to blend in.

    John Strange R737787
    World Traveller

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  5. #93
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    Default Re: Women crew members and wives at sea.

    One not so positive experience that I can relate and is going back to the poster who knows all about the actual occurence but doubt he knew the outcome later, in his post My worse Christmas at sea , was when one of the victims fell back into his room shot dead. His wife was travelling with him. After all the pandemonium and court cases it was found she was not legally married to the dead man , and received no compensation for her live in partner. Think all insurance monies went to the legal wife. She even had to pay her own fare home. Would imagine she didnt have too fond memories of a life on the ocean wave. JS
    In 1964 I was mate on the Warkworth in King George V dock in Hull. All females had to be off the ship at sunset and that included wives. This was not the company , it was the Harbour Boards Ruling. Not too long after this wives in such vessels were allowed to accompany their husbands under certain circumstances and signing the usual insurance waivers, which I doubt would not be legal in a court of law. The usual excuse not to carry was lifeboat capacity. By todays manning requirements think they would have to look for a different one. As someone said on the average tramp ship the accomodation was not suitable for female crew members, however the shipowner had no qualms for altering that to accomodate the equal rights groups, he had refused for years to better the accomodation so is one thing we should thank the ladies for. JS
    Last edited by j.sabourn; 11th June 2021 at 10:41 AM.
    R575129

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    Default Re: Women crew members and wives at sea.

    Just goes to prove you have to be very careful who you take to bed.
    Happy daze John in Oz.

    Life is too short to blend in.

    John Strange R737787
    World Traveller

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    Default Re: Women crew members and wives at sea.

    I was on a UASC ship, the Senior Electrician had his wife with him, 4 months in the old man got a telex from the head office. Can you confirm that Chris White (name changed just in case)has his wife with him onboard. Yes Mrs White joined in Liverpool. Can you check the name on Mrs Whites passport please. The name is Parkinson!!!.They tried to say that they were not long married and she had not got round to changing her passport yet. Please inform Senior Electrician Chris White that himself and Ms Parkinson will be signing off at the next available port.
    I think Chris would have had a lot of explaining to do as Mrs White had been phoning the company wanting to know when her husband was coming home lol

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    Default Re: Women crew members and wives at sea.

    I was in a port in Scotland, can't remember which one, a girls body was found in the water between a I think a Swedish ship and the wharf, if I remember right she had been murdered then tossed overboard.
    Des
    Lest We Forget

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    Default Re: Women crew members and wives at sea.

    In 1952 Shaky Mary was found in the dock alongside a Norwegian cjip
    in Leith , I think/

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  12. #98
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    Post Re: Women crew members and wives at sea.

    JS Your #93

    Well,you know me by now,John,when I'm bored (and not aboard) I like nothing better,apart from a bottle of ice cold Stella,to pick up on a ship mentioned in a post-and yours,like many of the stalwarts on here are always interesting old(ish) vessels,- and trace it's history.
    So here goes.
    m.v.WARKWORTH (ON 186927),completed 5/1962 by Bartram & Sons,Sunderland for Watergate Steam Shipping Co Ltd,Newcastle. Cargo ship,9,721 grt,diesel engine,13k.
    Subsequent History
    1970 SALAMAT-Greek
    1974 PHILIPPA-Greek
    1974 SKYMNOS-Cyprus,then Greek.

    FATE
    With the outbreak of hostilities between Iran and Iraq in Sept.1980,the Greek m.v.SKYMNOS was one of the more than 90 + vessels trapped in Shatt al Arab ports and adjacent Iraqi waterways.
    She lay at the Iraqi port of Fao(Al Faw) where she had arrived on 19/9/80,just before hostilities began in earnest,and having been anchored off the pilot station awaiting a berth since 2nd August.It was during a subsequent Iranian attack on the port of Fao on 9th January a few months later that she was so severely damaged to be declared a War Constructive Total Loss.She was abandoned,caught fire,broke her moorings and drifted into the Shatt al Arab where she remained for the rest of that war.
    A nice looking proper cargo ship-back in the day.186927 WARKWORTH of 1962.jpg

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    Default Re: Women crew members and wives at sea.

    That’s her Graham and that was my cabin the deck below the bridge deck outer starboard side. Days of our youth ? Some might say. Still 38 years to go after her. Ships like her were at one time the backbone of the British Merchant Navy. Cheers JS.
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    Post Re: Women crew members and wives at sea.

    Quote Originally Posted by j.sabourn View Post
    Thatís her Graham and that was my cabin the deck below the bridge deck outer starboard side. Days of our youth ? Some might say. Still 38 years to go after her. Ships like her were at one time the backbone of the British Merchant Navy. Cheers JS.
    I never saw any definitive answer as to why the Master's accommodation should be on the starboard side for'd of a vessel,and they nearly always were.I can only surmise that it was because that was the side that danger was most likely to come from i.e we are the giving way vessel and should alter course to starboard. On similar ships to the Warkworth, the Chief Engineer was on the port side for'd,with the midships cabins between them being Sparky(if he wasn't up on the bridge deck next to the Radio Shack) and the 2/O and 3/0.
    When I was a watchkeeper I nearly always avoided walking about on the starboard side above the Old Man,especially on the 12 to 4, in case I woke him up,and then would probably have to endure his annoying presence up there for the next few hours.We watchkeepers are a strange breed-we hate being alone-yet want to be left alone. I used to wear crepe-soled brothel creepers on the night watches .I would really have preferred my comfy slippers with pompoms on but probably would have looked a bit 'dodgy' in case of abandon ship.Still,better than no clothes or shoes in those circumstances,although I don't think fluffy slippers would last ten minutes when bailing out salt water from a lifeboat bilge.
    Same sort of thing in port-on cargo watch(no, I wore steel toecaps,not the fluffy slippers)- I would try and position the bridge front derricks,if not being used, in front of the Old Man's portholes on the starboard side...

    Attached is a pic of the Crystal Jewel showing what devastation can ensue when a ship slices through your accommodation .It is on the port side,but is tragic in that the only casualty was the 14 year old Master's daughter who was sleeping in an empty spare cabin there and was killed when the bows of the British Aviator sliced through the accommodation on 23/9/1961. The Master himself broke both legs when he jumped from the Bridge onto the lower Bridge deck below .That collision itself was one of the first so-called 'radar-assisted ' collisions where both vessels were making successive small alterations of course each,instead of more substantial ones,not plotting correctly and assuming a clear passing port to port situation,and also proceeding at too fast a speed in reduced visibility,all contravening the Collision Regs....

    I don't recall ever having nightmares at sea whilst asleep,but I often do since I swallowed t'anchor ,many years ago now.The same dream involves me being on watch,in coastal waters,lot of traffic around and being distracted by something elsewhere which I can't explain just what.About an hour later I suddenly realise I haven't looked out of the bridge windows or at the radar! Such a feeling of dread and then relief when I find we're proceeding OK. Then I wake up.Oh the sheer relief that I'm not at sea anymore!

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