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Thread: Landlubbers guide to Seamanship.

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    Default Landlubbers guide to Seamanship.

    Seafaring, like all professions and trades, has over the years developed a rich vocabulary which is often incomprehensible to the outsider. It hoped that this glossary will offer to the non-seagoing reader something of an explanation of the more commonly used terminology, and at the same time provide a touch of nostalgia for former seafarers.
    ABOARD - piece of wood
    ADRIFT - hazard following heavy snowfall
    AFLOAT - petty cash holding by the Purser
    AFT - frequently (Scottish)
    AGENT- fine fellow (eg our Captain’s a gent)
    AHEAD - lavatory on a Royal Navy ship
    ALOFT - top part of a house
    AMIDSHIPS- when you find yourself surrounded by lots and lots of other ships
    ANCHOR - 1960s teen idol
    ANCHORAGE - city in Alaska
    ARTICLES - features in a magazine or newspaper
    ASTERN - opposite to Agent (eg he’s a stern Captain)
    A’THWART - doubt (eg a’thwart you ordered the Pilot for 1600 hours)
    AVAST - huge
    AWASH - basic service provided by local laundrette
    BACK SPRING - reverse long jump
    BAIL - temporary release of accused person awaiting trial, usually supported by a sum of money
    BANK - financial services business
    BAR - establishment serving alcoholic beverages
    BATTEN - stick used by conductor to direct an orchestra
    BEAM - normal reaction on notification of homeward passage
    BOARD OF TRADE SPORTS - government sponsored fitness programme
    BOAT STATIONS - those at Harwich, Dover, Holyhead etc
    BOLLARDS - expletive
    BOOT TOPPING - type of polish for footwear
    BOW - formal greeting from a ship’s Master
    BOW WAVE - greeting from the sharp end of a ship
    BRIDGE - card game involving four players in two partnerships
    BULWARK - ambling steer
    BULKHEAD - hangover
    BUNK - seafarer’s yarn
    BUNKER - obstacle on golf course
    BUOY - junior ordinary seaman
    BUREAU - writing desk with drawers
    CABLE LENGTH - number of words in a telegram
    CAPE - a sleeveless cloak
    CAPTAIN’S TIGER - ship’s cat
    CAST OFF - removal of plaster support applied to injury after a Fall (which see)
    CHANNEL MARKER - tells you to which station your TV is tuned
    CHIPPING GANG - part of the galley team
    C.I.F. - a household cleaner
    CLEW - essential element of a crossword puzzle
    COAMING - important part of hair care
    COAST - taking things easy
    COMPASS - directional information (eg we got to compass the Crosby Light Ship before we enter the Mersey proper)
    CONTAINER SHIP - estimate of dimensions (eg this lock should container ship of 20,000 tons)
    COUNTER - flat topped fitment in a Bar (which see)
    COURSE - similar to Astern (which see) only rougher
    CROSS ALLEYWAY - the opposite of a Happy Alleyway
    CUNARD FEET - unit of linear measure once found on passenger ships of Cunard Line
    D.B.S. - high performance sports car produced by Aston Martin
    DECCA - record label which signed The Rolling Stones
    DECK - pack of playing cards
    DECK-HEAD SURVEY - important inspection of ship construction
    DEGREES - lubricant (eg Chief Engineer to Junior Engineer: make sure you put degrees on de bearings)
    DEE ESTUARY - de mouth of the river
    DEEP TANKS - profound gratitude
    DINGHY - sound made by the ship’s bell (eg dinghy-dinghy)
    DISPLACEMENT- accidental loss (eg if you can’t find your ship you’ve displaced it)
    DOCK - ship’s surgeon
    DODGER - workshy member of the crew
    DOUBLE DR - two ship’s surgeons
    DOUBLE HEADER - heraldic eagle, most commonly associated with the Byzantine Empire
    DOWN BY THE HEAD - asleep
    DOWN TO HER MARKS - gone shopping at M&S
    DRAUGHT - beer served from a cask
    DRAUGHT MARKS - frothy deposits on the inside of a beer glass
    DRY DOCK - ship’s surgeon (US Navy)
    ECHO SOUNDER - street vendor of a local newspaper
    E.R. TELEGRAPH - uncertainty when buying a newspaper (eg Er, Telegraph please)
    FALL - result of poorly executed Back Spring (which see)
    FASHION PLATE - image published in Vogue magazine
    FENDER - famous make of guitar
    FERRY - popular vocalist with Roxy Music
    FIDDLE - musical instrument
    FLYING BRIDGE - card game favoured by Royal Navy aircrew
    F.O.B. - type of Watch (which see)
    FO’C’SLE - reference to family (eg better write home soon or the fo’c’sle wonder where you are)
    FOREPEAK - feature of uniform cap
    FORETOP - one of the Motown vocal group
    FREEBOARD - gratuitous hotel accommodation
    GAFF - residential accommodation ashore between voyages
    GRIPE - to complain
    GROYNE - part of one’s anatomy
    GYRO REPEATER - very active disco dancer
    HATCH - composer of theme tunes for Crossroads and Neighbours etc
    HAUL - area just inside entrance door of one’s Gaff (which see)
    HAWSE PIPE - sore throat
    HAWSER - brother of Hengist in Anglo-Saxon legend
    HEAVE HO - hughie, mal de mer etc
    HEEL - part of a shoe
    HELM - tree common to the East End of London
    HOLD - to grip or grasp
    HOOK - maritime character in Peter Pan
    HOVE TO - route from Brighton’s near neighbour
    HULL - important North Sea port
    HULL DOWN - unfavourable local half time score
    INDENTURE - procedure offered by a Dentist
    JERQUE NOTE - sound of a sharp, sudden movement
    JUMPER STAY - canine command (eg Jumper - stay. Good dog)
    JURY RIGGED - illegal method of obtaining a favourable verdict in court
    KEEL - a University in the West Midlands
    LAUNCH - midday meal aboard ship
    LEE - town in Lancashire
    LIFEBOAT TICKET - a recommended advance purchase
    LOG EXTRACT - useful sap (eg resin, latex)
    LIST - composer of classical music
    LOCK - mechanism for securing a door
    LOCKER - person who secures a door
    LOOM - machine on which Shoals (which see) are weaved
    MANIFEST - clear or obvious
    MASTER (THE) - arch villain in Doctor Who
    MATE - non-vegetarian sandwich filling
    MONKEY ISLAND - attraction at Knowsley Safari Park
    MOOR - persons required to make up a docking party (eg the moor the merrier)
    MOORED - subject of Victorian parlour song
    NAVIGATE - labourers entrance
    NEAPS - turnips (Scottish)
    NUMBER 10s - aspirations of senior politicians
    OUTTURN - action occuring at closing time
    PAINTER - ship’s artist
    PEGGY - abbreviation of Margaret
    PIER - member of the upper House of Parliament
    PIER HEAD - scan the horizon over the sharp end
    PITCH - venue for cricket match, football match etc
    PLIMSOLE MARK - footprint left by a pair of pumps (trainers)
    PLOT - sequence of events in a play or novel
    PORT- a multi-purpose word (eg wine, arms drill, computer feature)
    PUMP ROOM - shoe locker on a tanker
    QUAY - instrument for opening or closing a Lock (which see)
    RADAR - character in the television series M*A*S*H
    RAKE - garden implement
    REVIE - former manager of Leeds United FC
    ROLL - bread item from the galley
    R.P.M. - abbreviated reference to the First Lord of the Treasury (eg RPM is Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson) *
    RUNNING LIGHT - jogging down to your ship in a pair of shorts
    SAIL - store event where items are at reduced prices
    SAILING - 1970s international hit for Rod Stewart
    SAMSON POST - a Biblical command (eg Delilah: Samson post this letter on your way to the barbers please)
    SHALLOW DRAUGHT - short measure at the Bar (which see)
    SHEER - garden implement
    SHIPPING THEM GREEN - carriage arrangements for unripe bananas
    SHIPWRIGHT - maritime article published in a magazine or journal
    SHOAL - garment worn by female seafarers on chilly nights
    SHORT STAY - quick turnround in port
    SINGLED UP - one’s situation after receiving a Dear John letter
    SKEG - seaside town on the east coast of England
    SLING - bandage-like support for injury to arm following a Fall (which see)
    SPARKS - loyalty card introduced by M&S
    SPRING OFF - not a good long range weather forecast for next year
    STABILIZER - substance which prevents the breakdown of emulsions
    STEAMING TIME - period during which the ship’s bar is open
    STEER - bovine quadruped
    STEERING GEAR - approved clothing worn by the helmsman
    STOKER - author of Dracula
    STOW - public school in Buckinghamshire
    STROP - ill temper (eg don’t go near him, he’s got a right strop on)
    TACK - equipment for horse riding
    TIDE - domestic laundry detergent
    TOPPING LIFT - expression of appreciation for high class elevator (eg what a topping lift)
    TRIM - a light haircut
    TRIP - stumble over an object on the deck
    TRUCK - medium to large road haulage vehicle
    UNDER WAY - incorrect measurement by local trader
    UNION PURCHASE - financial transaction with staff group
    WAKE - recover to consciousness, especially after conducting a Deck-Head Survey (which see)
    WARP - hyperspace propulsion system pioneered by Dr Zefram Cochrane
    WARPING WINCH - faster than light travel device
    WATCH - a small timepiece, worn on the wrist or on a chain in the pocket
    WHARF - the Klingon officer in Star Trek
    WHEELHOUSE - original name given to a caravan
    WINDLASS - very calm day
    WRECK (CONSPIC) - how you look after a night out with the boys
    YARD - enclosed exterior area of Gaff (which see)
    ZULU TIME - application of GMT in parts of southern Africa
    Made me laugh
    {terry scouse}

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    Default Re: Landlubbers guide to Seamanship.

    Well Terry, now you've sowed the seeds of Confucious

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    Default Re: Landlubbers guide to Seamanship.

    western ocean roll
    Seafood panini from Greggs.
    R635733

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    Default Re: Landlubbers guide to Seamanship.

    To remember that lot Terry you have to have been off the Booze for bloody weeks.
    Good luck mate.
    Graham R774640

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    Default Re: Landlubbers guide to Seamanship.

    Quote Originally Posted by Graham Payne View Post
    To remember that lot Terry you have to have been off the Booze for bloody weeks.
    Good luck mate.
    Graham you don't realize how right you are m8. Never spent as much time on this site for years. p.s. The Long haired one has got a cough I told her we have to be 2 meters apart for 3 months doctors orders I cant wait for bloody last orders to come back. I am still recovering from last week
    {terry scouse}

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    Default Re: Landlubbers guide to Seamanship.

    Hi Terry.
    Get the Grand kids to write them all down on the bedroom wall if they get isolated.
    Des

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    Default Re: Landlubbers guide to Seamanship.

    Terry mate we have land here, plenty of it.
    If you want o isolate her there is big desert not far from us plenty of room there LOL.
    Happy daze John in Oz.

    Life is too short to blend in.

    John Strange R737787
    World Traveller

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    Default Re: Landlubbers guide to Seamanship.

    #7 No room in the desert anymore, your PM has told all visitors to go home to their own countries. Rather difficult when a lot of airports are shut down worldwide

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Landlubbers guide to Seamanship.

    HI Ivan
    One of the more stupid things our PM has said out of many the last few weeks. Australia has relied on backpackers. and tourists, plus overseas students to the tune of $85 Billion a year to the benefit of our economy, this is year on year, he now wants to send them all packing, A flight out of Aus now costs $thousands, all that in order to shed himself of doing something positive. Like organizing transport and sending them out to the farms that are desperate for labour, at least until things get back a a bit of normality.
    Des

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Landlubbers guide to Seamanship.

    Des, Wait until this is all over and they get the bill we will all be chewing grass.
    {terry scouse}

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