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Thread: Cape Town Harbour some History

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    Default Cape Town Harbour some History




    History


    The history of the port follows that of Cape Town, which traces its roots back to 6 April 1652 when Jan van Riebeeck of the Dutch East India Company (VOC) established a revictualing station there. Earlier explorers had called it Table Bay from the late 15th century onwards.
    The first harbour construction was a jetty built in 1654 by van Riebeeck. Ships all anchored in the bay, and goods were transferred to and from the shore by smaller vessels. Table Bay is notorious for violent winter storms, when the wind blows on to a lee shore. Massive shipping losses were sustained by the Dutch Vereenigde OstIndische Companje, to the extent that eventually Table Bay was closed during the winter months, and ships were ordered to use Simon's Bay (part of False Bay, where Simon's Town is now) in winter.
    A vicious storm in 1858, long after the demise of the VOC, saw 30 ships blown ashore and wrecked, with huge loss of life. Lloyd's of London declined all further insurance on ships in Table Bay in winter, resulting in the British Colonial Government starting the construction, in 1860, of the first breakwater. This developed into the Victoria and Alfred Basin, the first safe harbour. There has been extensive expansion since then.


    Main areas

    The port evolved greatly over the centuries and currently consists of several main components:

    • The Ben Schoeman Dock: This is the larger outer dock of the port, where the container terminal is situated.
    • The Duncan Dock: This is the smaller and the older inner dock, containing the multi-purpose and fruit terminals as well as a dry dock, repair quay and tanker basin.
    • The yachting marina.
    • The Victoria and Alfred Basins: These were the main piers of the original Cape Town harbour, but now house the Victoria & Alfred Waterfront. However, these basins are still used by smaller commercial vessels such as fishing and pleasure boats and also by smaller passenger cruise ships.
    Last edited by Doc Vernon; 14th November 2019 at 12:52 AM.
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    Default Re: Cape Town Harbour some History

    Still one of my favorite ports, with Table Mountain in the back ground it creates an impressive sight.

    Yesterday speaking with a lady there, she was a member of my ISP team, spread all over the world with iinet, the one we use.
    She told me the weather was good, the dams are now full thanks to some good winter rain and looking forward to a good summer.
    Happy daze John in Oz.

    Life is too short to blend in.

    John Strange R737787
    World Traveller

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    Default Re: Cape Town Harbour some History

    The origins of the Cape Mails dates back to the fifteenth century.
    Sailors would leave letters under the postal stones for collection by ships heading back to Europe.
    Vic

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    Default Re: Cape Town Harbour some History

    Quote Originally Posted by vic mcclymont View Post
    The origins of the Cape Mails dates back to the fifteenth century.
    Sailors would leave letters under the postal stones for collection by ships heading back to Europe.
    Vic
    And judging by the time some mail takes it would suggest they still do.
    Happy daze John in Oz.

    Life is too short to blend in.

    John Strange R737787
    World Traveller

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