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Thread: 22 November 1941

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    Default 22 November 1941

    VIA: Neutral Shores, Ireland and the Battle of the Atlantic

    22 November 1941 a flight of three JU88 German aircraft were patrolling the Irish side of St Georges Channel, they first attacked the British coaster SKERRIES that was coming through Tuskar Sound and inside Irish territorial waters. SKERRIES was bombed and machine gunned sustaining slight damage from bomb concussion.

    Shortly after the British coaster ROCKABILL was attacked by the same aircraft, 3′ E of Greenore Point, County Wexford, one report says that attacked occurred 1200 yards off Rosslare pier head. There was no damage during this attack.

    1 26845970_4871280909611165_815195368474569966_n.jpg
    "Our veterans did not forget about us .... Let's not forget about them." From Michael Levesque

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    Default Re: 22 November 1941

    Thanks Keith,

    I know about this from my Dad's notes. Capt. W.J. HARTLEY D.S.C.

    "After the sinking of the BEACHY on 11th January 1941 I was entitled to a month's Survivor's Leave but I asked to join the SS SKERRIES again as Chief Officer. Thus followed 6 months between Glasgow and Cork with cattle and dairy produce, until I rejoined the Rescue Ship Service in July 1941.
    Having nearly been a victim of German Aeronauts in the BEACHY I quickly got Gunnery Drill going in the Seaman Section of the ship. I manned one of the Machine Guns on the Bridge- always the Starboard one as it was my Watch usually. We received unwelcome attention from a German plane every Saturday afternoon between 3;00 and 5;00pm. I can proudly say that never during my 6 months in the SKERRIES was a German plane able to cross over or above us. After I returned to the R.S. Service the crew of the SKERRIES excelled themselves in shooting down one of three German planes which attacked her off the Tuskar Rocks, Co. Wexford.
    The Chief Engineer, Jim Kirkpatrick said afterwards of the exploit, "Shades of Hartley."
    ================================================== ==========

    Over the Irish Sea the ships were not usually in Convoy but were on occasions afforded the luxury of air cover against the long range enemy Bombers. It was under those conditions that the Glasgow-Cork and Liverpool- Waterford services were maintained. 1941 was the peak year of attacks against the lone vessels in the Irish Sea. SKERRIES had several narrow escapes and on one occasion the German plane attacked with bomb and machine gun. The vessels, fully laden with cattle, engaged the aircraft with her weaponry and the running battle, in the Sound of Tuskar, continued until dusk, when Capt. McNeill brought his ship into Rosslare, resuming his voyage during the night. Rumour had it that the plane was brought down in the Irish Sea. For his successful action, Capt. McNeill was rewarded with an award of the M.B.E.
    Excerpt from THE CLYDE SHIPPING COMPANY, GLASGOW 1815-2000 by Harvey & Telford
    ================================================== =======
    Hope that gives you a fuller picture, Keith
    regards
    Brenda

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    Default Re: 22 November 1941

    Cannot thank you enough Brenda.

    Regards, Keith.
    "Our veterans did not forget about us .... Let's not forget about them." From Michael Levesque

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    Default Re: 22 November 1941

    VIA: Neutral Shores, Ireland and the Battle of the Atlantic

    23 November 1941, British coaster SKERRIES was attacked again, this time Off the Bailey lighthouse and once again inside Irish territorial waters. The ship was machine gunned but there were no casualties.
    "Our veterans did not forget about us .... Let's not forget about them." From Michael Levesque

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    Default Re: 22 November 1941

    Quote Originally Posted by Brenda Shackleton View Post
    Thanks Keith,

    I know about this from my Dad's notes. Capt. W.J. HARTLEY D.S.C.

    "After the sinking of the BEACHY on 11th January 1941 I was entitled to a month's Survivor's Leave but I asked to join the SS SKERRIES again as Chief Officer. Thus followed 6 months between Glasgow and Cork with cattle and dairy produce, until I rejoined the Rescue Ship Service in July 1941.
    Having nearly been a victim of German Aeronauts in the BEACHY I quickly got Gunnery Drill going in the Seaman Section of the ship. I manned one of the Machine Guns on the Bridge- always the Starboard one as it was my Watch usually. We received unwelcome attention from a German plane every Saturday afternoon between 3;00 and 5;00pm. I can proudly say that never during my 6 months in the SKERRIES was a German plane able to cross over or above us. After I returned to the R.S. Service the crew of the SKERRIES excelled themselves in shooting down one of three German planes which attacked her off the Tuskar Rocks, Co. Wexford.
    The Chief Engineer, Jim Kirkpatrick said afterwards of the exploit, "Shades of Hartley."
    ================================================== ==========

    Over the Irish Sea the ships were not usually in Convoy but were on occasions afforded the luxury of air cover against the long range enemy Bombers. It was under those conditions that the Glasgow-Cork and Liverpool- Waterford services were maintained. 1941 was the peak year of attacks against the lone vessels in the Irish Sea. SKERRIES had several narrow escapes and on one occasion the German plane attacked with bomb and machine gun. The vessels, fully laden with cattle, engaged the aircraft with her weaponry and the running battle, in the Sound of Tuskar, continued until dusk, when Capt. McNeill brought his ship into Rosslare, resuming his voyage during the night. Rumour had it that the plane was brought down in the Irish Sea. For his successful action, Capt. McNeill was rewarded with an award of the M.B.E.
    Excerpt from THE CLYDE SHIPPING COMPANY, GLASGOW 1815-2000 by Harvey & Telford
    ================================================== =======
    Hope that gives you a fuller picture, Keith
    regards
    Brenda
    Brenda, I have had my head buried in a newspaper dated 8th December 1941 amazing read that was the date Japan declared war on the UK and U S A, Following the attack on Pearl Harbour a matter of days really after the date you mention. We think we are badly done to with this pandemic claiming xmas, One can only imagine what kind of festivities our forefathers had to bare during the war years. p.s. One thing i found in the newspaper The Daily Mail Monday December the 8th 1941 priced 1d, I wonder if anyone can tell me what it was priced at 8d the ideal xmas present to send to those relatives serving in all the forces. it was called {KING SIX} But what was it. Regards Brenda i hope all is well in your world stay safe with all your family Terry.
    {terry scouse}

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    Default Re: 22 November 1941

    Terry my friend
    If it was December 8th 1943 it would have announced the arrival of a very important person in Liverpool Maternity, Oxford Street. I shall say no more !!
    Hope that you are feeling loads better now, Terry. We are all fine, thank God.
    regards
    Brenda

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    Default Re: 22 November 1941

    Brenda, I remember the walk up mount pleasant to Oxford st hospital alright the 4 of mine where born there, On a dark night it could be a shady visit, To many street corners i used to get the wife a bottle of Lucozade on the way up from Central Station and if a little nasty jumped out at me i would not have hesitated using it, Then on the way home i used to bring last nights empty bottle same thing. Glad to hear your all fine Terry.
    {terry scouse}

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