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Thread: Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

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    Default Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

    Queen Elizabeth the Second.

    April 21, 1926 -

    On February 6, 1952, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II became The Monarch of the United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland, Canada and the Commonwealth upon the death of her father, King George VI.

    Significant events have included her coronation in 1953 and the celebrations of her Silver, Golden, and Diamond Jubilees in 1977, 2002, and 2012, respectively. In 2017, she became the first British monarch to reach a Sapphire Jubilee. She is the longest-lived and longest-reigning British monarch, as well as the world's longest-serving female head of state, oldest living monarch, longest-reigning current monarch, and the oldest and longest-serving current head of state.
    "Our veterans did not forget about us .... Let's not forget about them." From Michael Levesque

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    Default Re: Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

    HM Queen Elizabeth II, Master of the Merchant Navy and Fishing Fleet.

    The origins of the Merchant Navy go back to the 17th century, when the earliest attempts were made to compile a register of all merchant seafarers, so that they could be called upon by the Royal Navy in times of national conflict. Those early attempts failed, as many private seafarers feared being ‘pressed’ into service for the Royal Navy.

    It wasn’t until 1835 that the first register was successfully compiled. At that time, Britain had the world’s foremost merchant fleet, as an island nation trading with its colonies and other nations around the globe. Having a pool of merchant vessels and their crews to call on in times of national crisis was a huge asset to the country and its full-time military fleet, the Royal Navy.
    It was during the First World War that this asset – then known as the Mercantile Marine – really proved its worth and led to it being renamed the Merchant Navy. During the conflict, merchant seamen readily volunteered to do their bit by transporting vital cargos across the seas to and from Britain, despite the evident dangers.

    Germany, with its policy of unrestricted warfare, made no distinction between merchant and military ships and considered all a target. Its fleet of new ‘U-boat’ submarines proved particularly deadly until new anti-submarine tactics came into effect. Merchant seaman paid a heavy toll, with almost eight million tons of merchant shipping sunk and around 17,000 lives lost.
    In honour of that sacrifice, King George V formally granted the title “Merchant Navy” collectively to the companies whose vessels made up the fleet. A decade after the war’s end, he appointed his eldest son, Edward, Prince of Wales, as “Master of the Merchant Navy and Fishing Fleets”. He retained the title on his accession to the throne in 1936 and it has since passed automatically to his successors, George VI and the current monarch, Queen Elizabeth II.

    When Britain entered the Second World War in September 1939, King George VI issued a formal message to his nation’s merchant seamen, telling them: “To each one I would say: Yours is a task no less essential to my people’s experience than that allotted to the Navy, Army and Air Force. Upon you the Nation depends for much of its foodstuffs and raw materials and for the transport of its troops overseas.”

    Why today is a poignant milestone for the Queen

    The Queen is marking the 68th anniversary of her accession to the throne.

    Soldiers from the King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery rode from London’s Wellington Barracks past Buckingham Palace to nearby Green Park for a Gun salute to mark the occasion.

    Seventy-one horses pulled six First World War-era 13-pounder field guns to the north of the park where the 41-gun salute was fired.
    The bells of Westminster Abbey, the gothic church where the Queen was married and crowned, will also ring out to mark Accession Day.

    https://www.itv.com/news/2020-02-06/...on-the-throne/

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    Last edited by Keith at Tregenna; 6th February 2020 at 05:56 PM.
    "Our veterans did not forget about us .... Let's not forget about them." From Michael Levesque

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