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Thread: Rigging

  1. #11
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    Default Re: Rigging

    Up until 1974 the UK workplace was covered by two Acts of Parliament.
    1) Railway Shops and Premises Act.
    2) The Factories Act.
    Both of these Acts required companies to have the Relevant Insurance, and a copy of the certificate of insurance to be displayed in a prominent place.
    Failure to display was an offence and the owner could be fined a hefty sum.
    Vic

  2. #12
    Lewis McColl's Avatar
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    Default Re: Rigging

    I sailed with UASC for a few years they had several ships with Stulken derricks. I do remember once I think it was in Glasgow it all went expensively wrong. The lot ended up hanging over the side and the load at the bottom of the dock and a badly damaged barge. Thankfully the only casualty was the Chief Officers under pants. I seem to remember that swinging the derrick from Fwd to Aft required a skilful operator. I think the SWL for the one on the Ibn Rushd was 100 ton ? I did 6 months on her UK , Gulf South America.Ibn Rushd.jpg

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  4. #13
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    Default Re: Rigging

    Come election time Vic It is always the claim of the sitting party to extol the numbers of pieces of legislation they have passed in their tenure of office. I always think they should keep their mouths shut as most acts are a piece of garbage , and they should be boasting how little legislation they have passed to interfere with business doing what it does best , is just that without putting more hurdles in the way. They have done their best over the years to remove all morality from peoples lives and made our world today an active breeding ground for the criminal . elements . Most politicians live in their own world of make believe. JS...

    Principal Acts concerning Shipping!
    The Merchant Shipping Act ( M.S. A.). Whose responsibility is vested in several government depts.viz. L.S.A.
    The Registeration of ships.. Enquirys into casualty’s .
    Customs and Excise.ministry of agriculture and fisheries .ministry of health. Port and local authority’s.The Home office.
    Last edited by j.sabourn; 28th February 2021 at 11:10 AM.
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    Default Re: Rigging

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Tindell View Post
    Ref 8, thats when we deck crew had to earn our money, would not be rigged in 5 minutes. the dreaded word, we've got to rig the Jumbo at the next port. But you knew the overtime would be good, kt
    Used to enjoy rigging the jumbo, it was only when you got up close and personal, you realised the blocks were taller than a man and flaking out topping lift and runner wires was a mammoth task that required all deck hands and mates. Lot of running up and down the mast with messenger ropes to help rig up snatch blocks for handling jumbo blocks with winch runners, looks good on the model, but in actuality the wires and blocks were covered in grease and oils, so not so easy to handle.

    #12 The Stulken was a pain, John A I believe has a lot of experience with them and had a tendency to go wrong when transferring from #1 to #2 operation.

    In the whole I enjoyed jumbo work, and down the WCSA and other places, we wouldn't allow the stevedores to operate them and they were quite happy about that.

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    Default Re: Rigging

    Sailed with a 180 ton jumbo Ivan the 6 fold guy blocks were 6 feet tall, had to have a crane to rig it. Especially as the top mast had been cut off to get Under the bridges to Chicago. So was no top hamper to assist. The jumbo had originally been fitted to carry locomotives out to India. Have a photograph somewhere , if find the next time someone round more versant in sending will have a go. JS
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  7. #16
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    Default Re: Rigging

    The later K class ships that UASC had built did not have the Stulken derricks, to maintenance intensive and also to many mishaps. They also moved away from Clark Chapman cranes and opted for a German crane AEG? These unlike the Clark Chapman cranes were all singing and dancing. PCB boards instead of relays/ switch gear. The AEG cranes were wonderful in Northern Europe but not a lot of use in the Arabian Gulf in July & August, the heat was to much for them and the PCB boards would fail, UASC forgot to order the Air Con unit model cranes so an expensive fix in the end.
    As said the Stulken was gone but they did have an arrangement on the AEG crane fitted ships that they could operate a pair of cranes. I have been trying to find a photo of the arrangement, cannot find it just now. Anyway it was called Gemini? I think it was two cranes mounted on one pedestal and they could work in tandem for heavy lifts from the same hold. They could also work independently working two holds at the same time. I think to work as heavy lift it was a wandering lead with a control box so the operator could observe from the hacth coaming what he was doing. Maybe someone can explain it a bit better than I have as a ships engineer my lifting experience was limited to the engine room crane or a chain block.

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  9. #17
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    Default Re: Rigging

    This short clip shows how things go wrong, looks expensive to, kt


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qXDgUX1HFXo
    R689823

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    Default Re: Rigging

    #13.. what used to be the sequence of events in the building of a British ship , today the coast guard may have replaced the MOT.
    Sanction from the MOT in order to get licence,must show what for.
    Builder builds and the MOT has watch with Lioyds , when sufficiently complete to measure .MOT measures for tonnage ,,results to the Ministry and Owners .
    Owner goes to Registrar of the port where requests registry. Owner must be British , naturalised or denizen . Foreign owner must float a British registered company.
    This is how it was in our lifetime how much these basic rules have been changed probably the politicians are unaware.
    For those who have heard of a carving note but unaware of what it is....
    Before a ship was handed over from the builders the owner must get a carving note from the custom house. On which must state the proposed name of the vessel plus her port of registry tonnage etc. this takes it name from
    From the fact that the ships tonnage and official number are carved or cut on her main beam or hatch coaming.. JS
    Last edited by j.sabourn; 28th February 2021 at 11:28 AM.
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  11. #19
    Lewis McColl's Avatar
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    Default Re: Rigging

    I can remember the IMO Number being on the bridge front and was it also on the stern? certainly in my last 20 years or so. But I cannot remember it in my earlier days? Did this practice come about as part of the recommendations from the Derbyshire enquiry. I did a search as I remembered the photo of the Derbyshire stern section lying on the sea bed, there is no sign of her IMO Number on her stern.

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    Default Re: Rigging

    The carving note is issued by the authority of the country where the ship is registered and is on its registry certificate. The registration number is to be permanently marked on the ships main beam or other prominent position.
    Nowadays the vessels official number is also it's IMO number and does not change irrespective of change of flag state throughout a vessels life. This came about when the legislation concerning safety management systems came into force, ISM safety management code. This required the vessels IMO number to be marked on the stern of the vessel along with it being in a prominent visible position, either on the accommodation front or on the monkey island, it's also on the vessels lifeboats and liferafts.
    Going back to rigging, I sailed on a number of geared bulk carriers where the cranes could be twinned in order to lift double there individual SWL. These were haggurland electro hydraulic cranes. One class had two cranes mounted on a single rotating pedestal situated between two batches so individually they could each work one hatch forward and one act of the pedestal lifting up to their SWL, or twinned together they could work one hatch at twice their individual SWL. They also could be operated by a single operator using a controller box on a wandering lead.
    What many shore, and possibly ships, personnel failed to realise was that the SWL of the crane was only at a certain angle, usually 30 degree. The pendulum marker scale attached to the crane jib indicated the SWL at other angles which would be less than that marked on the jib.
    Rgds
    J.A.

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