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Thread: Gallipoli

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    Default Gallipoli

    On 25th April 1915, during the landing on V Beach, Gallipoli, Able Seaman William Charles Williams from Chepstow secured the safety of landing craft while under continuous enemy fire.

    1 1 rn.jpg

    He was killed by a shell and was described by his commander as the bravest sailor he had ever met. He was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross, the first such award made to a member of the Royal Navy.

    The History of Wales



    Also, Gallipoli — The ANZAC force landed at Gallipoli on 25 April.

    On the 25th of April 1915, Australian and New Zealand soldiers formed part of the allied expedition that set out to capture the Gallipoli peninsula. These became known as Anzacs and the pride they took in that name continues to this day.

    "Those heroes that shed their blood and lost their lives (in Gallipoli). You are now lying in the soil of a friendly
    country. Therefore rest in peace. There is no difference between the Johnnies and the Mehmets to us where
    they lie side by side here in this country of ours. You the mothers who sent their sons from far away countries
    wipe away your tears. Your sons are now living in our bosom and are in peace. Having lost their lives on this land they have become our sons as well."

    Mustafa Kemal Atatürk


    Anzac Day goes beyond the anniversary of the landing on Gallipoli in 1915. It is the day we remember all Australians who served and died in all wars, conflicts, and peacekeeping operations. The spirit of Anzac, with its human qualities of courage, mateship, and sacrifice, continues to have meaning and relevance for our sense of national identity. On Anzac day, ceremonies are held in towns and cities across Australia and around the world to acknowledge the service of Australian veterans.

    https://turkey.embassy.gov.au/anka/GallipoliAnzac.html
    Last edited by Doc Vernon; 25th April 2021 at 04:23 AM.
    "Our veterans did not forget about us .... Let's not forget about them." From Michael Levesque

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    Default Re: Gallipoli

    Anzacs just in case there is anyone unaware is derived from Australian New Zealand Army Corps . JS
    R575129

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    Default Re: Gallipoli

    As far as I have read about the landings from family of those who took part , there was no such thing as purpose built landing craft as of the Second World War. All landings were by hand sculled long boats and ships lifeboats. Most of the boats manned by merchant seamen off whatever ship they belonged to. JS
    Last edited by j.sabourn; 25th April 2021 at 02:16 AM.
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