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Thread: Where does one go, to sign on to a ship today?Th

  1. #21
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    Default Re: Where does one go, to sign on to a ship today?Th

    There was no one faster at shafting seafarers than those who went from sea staff to office/shore staff. BP was famous for it certainly in the 80's,90's and 00's

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    Default Re: Where does one go, to sign on to a ship today?Th

    Quote Originally Posted by Lewis McColl View Post
    There was no one faster at shafting seafarers than those who went from sea staff to office/shore staff. BP was famous for it certainly in the 80's,90's and 00's
    Not true of everyone who went from sea to shore staff, I worked my ******** off getting improved conditions for the seafarers in the company I was appointed Supt. I like to think I succeeded from the letters (some of which I still have) I got from the Masters of the ships under my control. Generalisations can be erroneous, and a lot depends upon the attitude of the sea staff as well, some don't want to be helped, because they like moaning and sh*t stirring. There are two sides to a coin.

  4. #23
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    Default Re: Where does one go, to sign on to a ship today?Th

    There were different attitudes to the job as there is in all walks of life , I remember the personnel managerof the company I served my time with , and no doubt if things had been different I would have retired with, had the usual conflict of interests on board between deck and engine room with the usual squabbles similar to what goes on here at times. When I mentioned to him it was a Storm in a teacup , he said I know and like it that way , it keeps any flack away from himself and the company , in other words fight among yourself and donít bother me. I have always remembered that as the way the shipowner works, and tend to carry on myself to the same sort of storms in teacups on here, reminds me of a girls school at times , I went to a mixed school so always kept on the right side of the girls. Or kept my opinions to myself. JS
    As regards BP I know people made redundant with same and they got way above the odds on redundancy, my son in law was one a shore worker but he still gets a pension From same. JS.
    Last edited by j.sabourn; 7th May 2021 at 01:12 AM.
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    Default Re: Where does one go, to sign on to a ship today?Th

    John.
    I can only wish. But I don't look back in anger.
    Des
    Lest We Forget

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    Default Re: Where does one go, to sign on to a ship today?Th

    I don’t either Des , but I would never make the same mistake twice if could be helped. I learned to always look for credibility in a person or an employer , if that is or was lacking then the proverbial barge pole should come into play. There are many such people around , and once they get their feet under the table flourish like the proverbial pox. JS
    Last edited by j.sabourn; 7th May 2021 at 03:40 AM.
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    Thumbs up Re: Where does one go, to sign on to a ship today?Th

    Although I am well past seagoing age (81) I often wonder what the system is now. I was a Deck Hand between 1957-1964, Deck-Boy to AB. The system then was report to the Pool Office, having got clearance from the Union. If you had to travel to a different port elsewhere in the UK you got the necessary rail vouchers etc. and away you went. Depending on the type and size of vessel, you reported on board, produced paperwork and signed the articles. That was that! You could be assigned as a watch-keeper or dayworker. Whichever it was amounted to 8 hours a day. Otherwise you clicked into overtime. The articles we signed were for two years, which meant that the shipowner could keep you away from the UK for that time. However, all my ships were regular runners and were between six weeks to three months. Happy days (mostly) but I never regretted coming ashore. Home Trade articles were slightly different inasmuch as the watch-keeping was four on four off whilst at sea, as opposed to four on eight off on deep sea articles. Consequently the money was always better. Ah, them were the days Jim lad!

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    Default Re: Where does one go, to sign on to a ship today?Th

    #26 Gary I retired at 65 and was urged to carry on until 70 which I declined. However for the first couple of years often the phone used to ring and my reply was no way Hosea. The very last offer I had was when I was 70 and I was in two minds whether to take or not as the conditions of the job were ideal. I dithered too long and someone else from NZ took it. However during the correspondence with my erstwhile future employer an American who lived in Guam , I said to him you do know I am 70 don’t you ? His reply was so what ! The person you would be relieving is 82. Cheers JS
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    Default Re: Where does one go, to sign on to a ship today?Th

    Hi John.
    Maybe it was just as well you didn't take up the offer, you may have been like the Flying Dutchman. In today's paper Many Asian nations have stopped all seamen from landing, that's left Captains unable to change weary crews and left over 100,000 seafarers stranded at sea.
    According to the Chamber of Shipping, this is a perilous moment for Global supply given that ships transport 90% of worlds trade, the crewing crises is disrupting the supply of all commodities.
    Des
    Lest We Forget

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    Default Re: Where does one go, to sign on to a ship today?Th

    #28 WA is a good example.
    They attempt to turn away any ship that has crew who may be displaying or confirmed cases of Covid. Only if their crew are extremely unwell do they allow them onshore under very strict conditions.
    There is one currently heading to WA port with sick crew.
    They will certainly make their stay as brief as possible.

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  14. #30
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    Default Re: Where does one go, to sign on to a ship today?Th

    Go back 200 years a short time in the history of the world , consider leprosy and the practice of containment , there is an ex leper colony In Indonesia just above Bali which we went to for cargo one time. Wouldn’t surprise me if it wasn’t re-opened and put back in use , and calling it a quarantine station. Leprosy once considered incurable , today is considered one of the very easy plagues to cure and control . It took many years to find the means for a cure , the present epidemic seems to be following suit. Leprosy goes back to biblical times. JS
    Last edited by j.sabourn; 26th July 2021 at 04:44 AM.
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