Page 1 of 8 1 2 3 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 79

Thread: How about that

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,244
    Thanks (Given)
    2307
    Thanks (Received)
    2787
    Likes (Given)
    3611
    Likes (Received)
    6490

    Default How about that

    I signed up and went to Gravesend (Catering) in 1953, 16 years old. The law was I had to stay in until aged 26. I enjoyed my time until I met what I thought was the women of my dreams, the thought of being away from her was not on. I jumped! I paid off the the Athlone Castle in 58, went to the catering school for six weeks, gave a cock and bull story so I could get my National Health cards and work for a month before heading back to sea, as I had a contract with Union Castle. We got married on Saturday June 7th, 1958, and sailed for Canada the next Wednesday, (I think). Aboard the Sylvania.

    The reason I needed my NH Cards was that you were supposed to hand them in before you left the country if you were emigrating. Never was asked for them, so assume it was B.S..

    I guess I was the only MN guy that jumped ship in England.

    About three months after I left, My mother said there was a knock at the door. Standing there was an officer and two military police. The officer asked if I was there. She said "He emigrated to New Zealand and he's not coming back." and that was the last she heard of it.

    I've wondered, perhaps if I had handed in my NH cards, it would have filtered down eventually to the army that I'd done a runner and had no plan to come back, and if I had come back I would have had to reapply for my NH cards and "Gotcher Rodney!" Maybe I'm reading to much into it, but It's a thought.

    Cheers, Rodney
    Last edited by Rodney Mills; 15th September 2021 at 09:53 PM.

  2. #2
    Keith at Tregenna's Avatar
    Keith at Tregenna Guest

    Default Re: Parents

    Cheers Rodney, both interesting and as ever well received.

    Regards,

    Keith.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    W.A.
    Posts
    23,737
    Thanks (Given)
    12898
    Thanks (Received)
    13754
    Likes (Given)
    19154
    Likes (Received)
    77030

    Default Re: Parents

    My son had a friend when in his teens , think again may of already put this on before, anyhow will be there twice if have. His father was French and his mother was English , think he was also born in England and had never been to France and did not speak the lingo. He got his French call up papers as believe their national service the same as the likes of Norway ran on for long after the British one. He refused to go, and was told if he ever visited France he would be arrested as a draft dodger. JS
    R575129

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Cooma NSW
    Posts
    9,022
    Thanks (Given)
    10260
    Thanks (Received)
    5251
    Likes (Given)
    44364
    Likes (Received)
    27018

    Default Re: How about that

    Hi Rod.
    Like me when I emigrated to NZ, my sister sent me the callup papers, I got them in Cape Town, I had them for years can't find them now, don't think they will still be after me.
    Des
    R510868
    Lest We Forget

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Blue Mountains NSW
    Posts
    24,235
    Thanks (Given)
    45047
    Thanks (Received)
    13130
    Likes (Given)
    52440
    Likes (Received)
    39405

    Default Re: How about that

    Joined the Merchant Navy at the time, so was exempted from South African National Service, however landed up later doing time with the RAF which i loved!
    Cheers
    Senior Site Moderator-Member and Friend of this Website

    R697530

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    W.A.
    Posts
    23,737
    Thanks (Given)
    12898
    Thanks (Received)
    13754
    Likes (Given)
    19154
    Likes (Received)
    77030

    Default Re: How about that

    #6.. You’d be in your element here then Vernon, could look at all the pictures of past airmen in the main hall , you may know who they all are , I don’t. I was an Honoury member of the RAAFA Up to last week, but now a full member on a small annual charge which gets me into various establishments , still looking for the Houses of Ill Repute , Remember travelling in a train in uk 65 years ago with a young airman going back to his billet , complaining bitterly that a regiment of Gurkha troops stationed near him had their own house of ill repute sponsored by the British government , and they didn’t , thought maybe they may have got over the years ,but not sighted yet . Maybe being the Oz airforce they may have camels instead , if NZ maybe sheep. Cheers JS.

    We stayed on an American Airbase in Lincs round about the time the Yanks bombed Gaddafi.They were friends of the wife and we were invited to stay with them for a week, as they had stayed with us. You would not have known you were in England , everything was there , bowling alleys, cinemas ,Stores selling everything , the only one we weren’t allowed in was their PX duty free. They even had their own police force and sheriffs department .Their own families plus all their family pets. Some of those families never went outside the gates so didn’t even know what England looked like. All their food was flown in from the states daily. Don’t think they bought anything locally. Schools churches everything there , it was little America in England , and would have to see it to believe it. Cheers JS
    Last edited by j.sabourn; 16th September 2021 at 04:37 AM.
    R575129

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Sunbury Victoria Australia
    Posts
    25,042
    Thanks (Given)
    8331
    Thanks (Received)
    10140
    Likes (Given)
    106801
    Likes (Received)
    45746

    Default Re: How about that

    I was always confused about the length of time required at sea to avoid conscription.

    In 1960 I was told it was two years but some here say longer.
    I know many of the gay brigade went to avoid not only conscription but procecution if found in a compromising situation.
    Happy daze John in Oz.

    Life is too short to blend in.

    John Strange R737787
    World Traveller

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Torquay
    Posts
    11,467
    Thanks (Given)
    3440
    Thanks (Received)
    7760
    Likes (Given)
    11953
    Likes (Received)
    34924

    Default Re: How about that

    Quote Originally Posted by happy daze john in oz View Post
    I was always confused about the length of time required at sea to avoid conscription.

    In 1960 I was told it was two years but some here say longer.
    I know many of the gay brigade went to avoid not only conscription but procecution if found in a compromising situation.
    John the length depended on when you joined the MN, if joining at 16 then it was 10 years, as you could be called up until aged 26, most joined up before papers starting arriving at age 18, some didn't get their papers until in their 20's so delayed entry, but they were chancers. The only official delayed conscriptions were apprenticed engineers (as far as MN is concerned). What most forget is the exemption proviso for the MN, if you came ashore at aged 26 then you automatically went on the reservist list until aged 36, but this could only be activated if UK was involved in another WW and not wars sch as Korea etc

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    isle of wight
    Posts
    6,701
    Thanks (Given)
    2291
    Thanks (Received)
    5238
    Likes (Given)
    15143
    Likes (Received)
    24216

    Default Re: How about that

    I think by the time i went to sea late 1957, national service had been scrubbed, unless i am on the reserve list, and i don't know about it LOL, in any case at 81 now would not be much good, kt
    R689823

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,244
    Thanks (Given)
    2307
    Thanks (Received)
    2787
    Likes (Given)
    3611
    Likes (Received)
    6490

    Default Re: How about that

    Keith and Lewis.

    I did a runner in June of 1958 and it was still on then. I just googled "when did the British Army National Service end.


    Google:

    National Service ended gradually from 1957. It was decided that those born on or after 1 October 1939 would not be required, but conscription continued for those born earlier whose call-up had been delayed for any reason.

    Wikopedia:

    The act also changed the trades considered essential services to the merchant navy, farming and coal mining (previously, essential services were coal mining, shipbuilding, engineering-related trades and—to a limited extent—medicine). Young men working in the essential services were exempted from National Service for a period of eight years. If they stopped working in these industries before this period of eight years ended (that is, before turning 25), they could be called up for National Service. Because of the political issues which would have arisen, there was also no recruitment of national servicemen from Northern Ireland.

    Keith and Lewis, I was born in 1958, so I was right, I would have had to stay in, but the law reads until I had turned 25. However, It was common knowledge that 26 and out was the age, and on the Castle boats there were not many waiters, cooks, or other catering staff onboard over 26.

    I'm not sure of their math, but we were subject to the draft after our 18th birthday, and eight years in the MN meant you would be 26, yet the law reads turned 25, but you wouldn't have done the 8 years, my math says you would have had to completed the 25th year and then you would be 26 years old. Anyway had circumstances been different for me and I had stayed in, and because I was born before 1939 I had to stay while those born after 1939 got a free pass to civilian life.

    I don't mean to sound like I didn't like the MN. I've done a lot of moves in my life that have moved my expectations way beyond what I had hoped and my almost 5 years in the MN, moved me away from a smart Alec, street punk to becoming a man, and to know when to open and when to close my mouth, that their is always someone tougher and smarter than me. And to learn... I learnt to say, Okay, I've made it to an apprentice cook, how can I become the best cook, how can I be the best Sous Chef, Executive Chef, Food and Beverage Director...etc. etc. to President and CEO of a multi national company And it all started in the MN for me, that gave me the direction and drive. I wish my sons could have done at least "Two years Before The Mast".

    Cheers Rodney
    Last edited by Rodney Mills; 16th September 2021 at 09:47 PM.

Page 1 of 8 1 2 3 ... LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •