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Thread: How about that

  1. #21
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    Default Re: How about that

    Sorry to hear your story Victoria, as we age we all become vulnerable, and a loving partner can mitigate a huge lot of the problems, i count myself very lucky to have a loving partner, as obviously your husband has also, so keep your chin up and keep smiling. I can also sympathise with you and your sons cancer, my youngest son had cancer 2 years ago, and is now ok, the good thing is that after cancer frequent checkups is at least a comfort, look after yourself KT
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    Default Re: How about that

    Victoria it is a terrible illness I call it the Silent illness because as it develops further they are unable to tell you what they are thinking you have to go by facial expressions that is the only way I can go by the medication my Val is on seems to have slowed it down slightly but you still notice it progressing and it is soul destroying to watch but you do learn to cope with it, you are a very strong person and will manage these things in your own way, we are all with you and don't be afraid to come on site with anything you want say if it eases the burden. Rgds Den PS hope I have expressed myself correctly and not caused you any more anxiety

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    Default Re: How about that

    Wrong, NS lasted until the early sixties and the last one to be demobbed came out sometime in1962?

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    Default Re: How about that

    Well done Rod you did,nt miss anything by not joining the idiots who did their NS. I was stupid enough to do my NS then went to sea ,just wish that I had been advised of the opportunities and fun that the MN offered before call up instead of all the dreary B/S and stupidity of the bloody army.

  6. #25
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    Default Re: How about that

    Hi Victoria.
    Always sad to hear about some loved one getting Dementia, or any disease for that matter, after years of working hard all we want is a nice retirement together. I wish you all the best, and hope that things get better for you both soon.
    Des
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  7. #26
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    Default Re: How about that

    #29 Just ordered 15 mixed bottles of good wine on a special offer ( $119) from the national senior cits. in conjunction with one of the good winerys in the eastern states delivered to the door. That works out roughly to pounds = ? not bothered . One good thing for wine drinkers your never short of a good drop in Oz. Cheers JS
    Last edited by j.sabourn; 23rd September 2021 at 05:09 AM.
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  8. #27
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    Default Re: How about that

    I worked in an aged care facility for over six years.
    I have seen what Dementia can do and it is one of the worst diseases you can think of.
    Fully fit people with their minds gone.

    Where I do my voluntary work we have a number in various stages of it, not a pretty sight.
    My paternal grandmother suffered with it and was put in a home, but she became violent and had to be kept with a few others in the same way away from the others.
    Worst thing was that along with the others in that condition she was given sedatives to clam her down.
    I think that did her in at the end.

    We have a friend in Adelaide who had to put her husband into care as he was also getting violent.
    Now in a separate part of the home and on sedatives.

    Victoria, not all end up like that, there have been many advances made in medical science in this disease, so never ever give up, with your love and care he will be OK.
    Happy daze John in Oz.

    Life is too short to blend in.

    John Strange R737787
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  10. #28
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    Default Re: How about that

    Victoria:

    Could you please explain "closed Books". I'm guessing that it means you cannot change your family doctor,? If so it doesn't work like that here in the States. A doctor could close his practice if he has a full load of patients, but I have never been turned down or know of a doctor who is full. I have moved from South Carolina to Oklahoma. I googled for the names of family practice doctors (g.p.) in my new town, then I pulled up their history and found out what medical school they went to, how long they had been in practice and what was said about them etc.. Narrowed it down, chose one, booked an appointment and went for an exam. I didn't feel comfortable with the first one, so dumped him and chose another. She seemed very competent, so I had my medical history transferred from my doctor in South Carolina to her in Oklahoma.

    My first pick of a cardiologist was the same, so I have chosen another who seems very confident. Again another female doctor. I prefer female doctors, they have proven to ME to be more thorough, patient, and give a little more time to my health questions. Part of my choosing of the dumped doctors was they were recommended to me. I have done the same in choosing a new dentist, didn't care for the first one, happy with my second pick.

    Cheers, Rodney

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  12. #29
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    Default Re: How about that

    Rodders, no such problem here in Oz, though some may not be in a hurry to take any more on.,

    You can go to just about any one and be seen. Many go GP shopping for prescriptions when it comes to some drugs.
    Though the gov has now set a process in placed to reduce that pratcice


    But from what I haver been told it is very different in UK.

    My brother in law moved from London to the south coast, had to complete a form and send in to NH who then allocated a new GP for him, no choice in it.
    Happy daze John in Oz.

    Life is too short to blend in.

    John Strange R737787
    World Traveller

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  14. #30
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    Default Re: How about that

    Lewis and anyone interested.

    First.

    There is no medical program, here in the States, like what you have in the UK. The term for that here is socialized medicine.

    Lewis.
    Following are statistics:

    "The latest data are available from the*National Health Interview Surveys Early Release ProgramUninsuredNumber of persons under age 65 uninsured at the time of interview: 32.8 millionPercent of persons under age 65 uninsured at the time of interview: 12.1%Percent of children under age 18 uninsured at the time of interview: 5.1%Percent of adults aged 18-64 uninsured at the time of interview: 14.7%Source:*Health Insurance Coverage: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, 2019*pdf icon[PDF 412 KB]Private insurancePercent of persons under age 65 with private insurance at time of interview: 63.7%Percent of children under age 18 with private insurance at time of interview: 55.2%Percent of adults aged 18-64 with private insurance at time of interview: 66.8%Source:*Health Insurance Coverage: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, 2019*pdf icon[PDF 412 KB]"

    Now, my comments:

    Most working people have medical coverage with their employers and self employed carry insurance*for themselves and in most cases for their employees.

    Those without means of support and minimal savings are covered. by* a program called Medicaid and children in poor families can be covered by a program called CHIPS (Children Health Insurance Programs).

    Everyone pays into a medical retirement scheme called Social Security,* At age 65 a medical program called Medicare is in effect that covers 80% of doctors fees which have been negotiated down by* Medicare and the doctor and hospital participate. The extra 20% (of the non Medicare doctor's negotiated fee) is the responsibility of the patient.* That said, there are companies that sell insurance to cover the Medi-gap 0f 20%.*
    *
    If you are poor with minimal savings you would qualify for a program*called MEDICAID, and you would be covered.

    Those who stayed in employment with a company/union/military/government who covered you in your working years, would still cover you in your retirement and you would not have to pay for the 20%, as you are not part or paid into Social Security.

    My wife and I retired when she was aged 36, and me 46.* She was a school teacher (I was teacher's pet) and when she hit 65 she qualified for her pension plus she had union based health coverage 100%.* When I retired I took out private insurance for me that covered me 100% even when I went overseas.* At age 65, I qualified for Medicare through paying into*Social Security. and I have coverage for prescription drugs. So I am fully covered.

    An amount of those uninsured people are those who earn too much to qualify for Medicaid but don't earn enough to pay the price of insurance, and never worked for a company that provided medical insurance. If you don't pay into Social Security you do not get a pension or medical coverage at age 65,*you would rely on*Medicaid once you had used*up your savings.

    All that said.* If you had no money, had not paid into Social Security, had no insurance, you cannot be turned away from medical service, it would not be as selective as mine or my wife's was, but you would not be left to die on the streets. Some homeless people do, because they sadly are emotionally ill, and refuse to go to the hospital.* If you are a victim of a crime, accident or indigent you cannot be turned away from treatment.* You are not going to be left on the side of the street to rot. If I fell off a ladder I would go to the nearest hospital emergency room, they would accept my insurance, they would still have to treat me if I was broke.* Golly! What would the tourists say if we just left the*ill*and*wounded laying in the*streets?

    Hope the answers*your question.* Rodney

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