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Thread: Brief history of barry docks

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    Default Brief history of barry docks

    BRIEF HISTORY OF BARRY DOCKS IN PICTURES AND MUSIC.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0soF...eoNXpOwoujcI2M
    "Our veterans did not forget about us .... Let's not forget about them." From Michael Levesque

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    Default Re: Brief history of barry docks

    THE 'Curse of the Barry Dock Mummy' terrorised townsfolk of Barry more than 100 years ago, with an article from the Barry Dock News the only surviving account of the spooky tale.
    The Chilean transporter ship Maipo arrived in Barry in early March 1914, remaining in dock for three weeks. Barry dock workers feared there was something unworldly about its cargo and complained to the port sanitary inspector to examine their concerns.
    Commander Diaz of the Maipo explained he was taking an Egyptian mummy, stored in the mid-deck, to Germany where it was to be displayed in a museum. After he declined to move the corpse, many dock workers refused to work anywhere within its vicinity and were accused of having "overactive imaginations."
    The Maipo finally set sail for Bremerhaven, Germany, passing Dover on March 22.
    Records of the ship surfaced again in The Times Shipping News three days later, when it was said to be in distress in the Bay of Biscay. Repeated requests for help were broadcast, pleading with ships to come to the aid of the 105 crewmen on board. With a heavy gale blowing, the steering gear had broken and despite numerous ships hearing the cry for help, they were reluctant to attend.
    Finally, a steamer called The Northam, which had set sail from Barry, arrived to assist on March 26. Unable to get a line to the Maipo however, they waited till daybreak when second officer D.M Evans heroically swam out to the stranded ship.
    The Chilean ship and its 75-strong crew had descended into chaos, with many of those intoxicated by the time the ship was rescued, but reports of looting were later denied by Commander Diaz.
    The Curse of the Mummy was not over yet, however.
    The Northam towed the Maipo to Falmouth, with both badly damaged in the process, and there were more complications to follow.
    The Northam sought salvage remuneration through the courts, to compensate them for the damage caused in the rescue. While giving evidence, the harbourmaster at Falmouth – a key witness in proceedings – fell backwards from the witness box and was pronounced dead shortly after.
    Final judgement was made on the case in November 1914, with 6,000 awarded to the Northam, including 100 for Second Officer D.M Evans.
    Excavations of King Tutankhamun's tomb in 1922 brought the curse of the mummy into the mainstream consciousness. Only one small item in the Barry Dock News in 1914 makes reference to the Barry Dock Mummy. No further traces have been found.
    The Barry Dock News report featured in March 1914, in the Friday 13 edition.
    "Our veterans did not forget about us .... Let's not forget about them." From Michael Levesque

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