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Thread: Use of Met. Office Volunteer Observers Logs UN IPCC

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    Default Use of Met. Office Volunteer Observers Logs UN IPCC

    We are constantly reading of reports from the UN IPCC of impending disaster, because of " Anthropogenic Global Warming"( AGW or CAGW). Our coasts etc. are implanted with useless tax- payer subsidised" Wind Farms" and our Electricity etc. bills are soaring because of EU directives based on these reports.

    The basis of these CAGW claims is research carried out by the University of East Anglia Climate Research Unit (UEA.CRU) resulting in a " Graph of Global Temperatures since 1850" called HADCRUT - see http://www.cru.uea.ac.uk/cru/data/te...e/HadCRUT4.png.

    Before I go any further , I would like to hear from any Mate/ Deck Officer/ Apprentice/ Cadet who carried out observations, stating what was the commonest method of taking Sea Surface Temperatures.(SSTs)

    I am sure , with what I have to say, all will be outraged.


    Laurie Ridyard.

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    Default Re: Use of Met. Office Volunteer Observers Logs UN IPCC

    On Weather reporting to the Met. office on all ships I was on sea temperatures were taken by the bucket over the side method, the bucket supplied by the met. office being a long narrow shape consructed of some rubber material and wide enough to take the thermometer which used to be dropped in. This beleive mentioned in a previous post. JS

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    Default Re: Use of Met. Office Volunteer Observers Logs UN IPCC

    J.Sabourn.

    Thank you for your response!

    When in rough weather, did you get the temp. from the ER Intake ?

    Regards,

    Laurie.

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    Default Re: Use of Met. Office Volunteer Observers Logs UN IPCC

    Quote Originally Posted by Laurie Ridyard View Post
    .....When in rough weather, did you get the temp. from the ER Intake ?
    Definitely not allowed on any ships I sailed on, would have been meaningless, when in the era of taking these samples, bad weather was just something that real seamen coped with and was rarely an excuse for not doing something, except of course chipping and painting on the main deck, but the mate/bosun would find you some chipping duties on another deck, bad weather rarely interfered with shipboard duties and bad weather readings were just as important, if not more so than fair weather ones

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    Default Re: Use of Met. Office Volunteer Observers Logs UN IPCC

    #3... That was the easy way to do. Dont know what the other watchkeepers did, I always took with the bucket as advised. Cheers John S

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    Default Re: Use of Met. Office Volunteer Observers Logs UN IPCC

    In the time I spent deep sea (22 yrs) with the Canadian Pacific, all the ships I was on were weather reporting ships sending 4 hourly observations off to Bracknell. The biggest moaners were the sparkies who had to transmit the encoded reports by morse.
    The rubber bucket supplied by the met. office had a lead weight enclosed in the bottom of it to make it sink and if I recall correctly the instructions from the met. office were to allow it to sink to a depth of at least 6 feet before retrieving it. With its lead weight it could be quite a lethal weapon in a gale if it got caught by the wind and blown back into you. In bad weather with the ship rolling it was often prudent to take the sea water temperature from a sheltered area on a lower deck rather than the bridge wing.
    On observing ships the met. office also supplied you with a recording aneroid barometer as there was a code for not only recording the pressure but whether it was rsing or falling.
    The met. log book along with the paper record charts from the barometer were sent off regularly to Bracknell and in the Marine Observers booklet, published quarterly, there was a section at the back that listed all the ships with the number of observations they had sent in and from which part of the world they were from. Annually the met. office would present an engraved Barometer to the Captain of the ship that had sent in the most records over the year.
    You were also encouraged to send in reports, with photos, of any phenomenon such as water spouts, rainbows, sightings of whales, strange cloud formations, sudden and large drops or rises in pressure as storms passed over, etc. and these would be published in the said journal.
    On the North Atlantic run with C.P. one ship I was on actually got fitted with a dedicated telex machine that you could type in the codes and it automatically sent the coded info. off to Bracknell. Another ship I was on (C.P. Ambassador ex. Dart Atlantic) actually had a special weather container fitted and we carried a qualified Metrological Officer who used to release weather balloons at 2 hourly intervals through a special hatch on the top of the container. These were fitted with radio transmitters that sent back to the container air temp. and pressure continuously as they rose up into the upper atmosphere. This was part of a special study into the atmospheric conditions of the North Atlantic.
    Strangely enough, although we were U.K. registered the met. men came from the Finnish metrological body and when they found out that vodka was available on board, well the amount they consumed was incredible. There were two of them rotating two trips on two trips off and one of them had to be on the verge of alcoholism even missing the ship sailing in Montreal once and having to be taxied down to Escoumains to join the ship when we dropped the pilot off. The sister ship, with a Hong Kong registry was similarly fitted but there weather men came from Bracknell.
    The ships observations must have been going from the pre WW2 days as my fathers death is actually mentioned in the Marine Observers log saying that his name had appeared in log books since well before the start of WW2.
    Coastal shipping were encouraged to send in an abbreviated version of the reports consisting of sea temp. and pressure along with sea and weather conditions as far as I can recall but I guess few did as I don't think that they were required to send these reports via radio, just that the regularly sent off the log books for examination by met. officers at Bracknell.
    All in all when deep sea doing met. reports was an enjoyable break from the monotony of watch keeping and getting the sparky out of bed to send the 2400 obs. was quite fun. Obs. were taken every 4 hrs. using ships time and part of the coded reports gave the ships time difference to GMT.
    rgds
    JA

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    Default Re: Use of Met. Office Volunteer Observers Logs UN IPCC

    going from oz to japansaw a large area of sea perhaps half a mile across bubbling and steam flying off .....we took a hardturn away all hands coming to have a look i think it was an island being born from anundersea volcano ....a bit scary to see .....regards cappy that was 61

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    Default Re: Use of Met. Office Volunteer Observers Logs UN IPCC

    The SS Maid of Kent had a sample cock and thermo,meter built into the side , in the engine room , used to take two or three on way to Cherbourg and back
    Rob Page R855150 - British & Commonwealth Shipping ( 1965 - 1973 ) Gulf Oil -( 1973 - 1975 ) Sealink ( 1975 - 1986 )

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    Default Re: Use of Met. Office Volunteer Observers Logs UN IPCC

    Rob has Cappy not asked yet what ship the Maid of kent mated with, very unusual for a Maid to be so endowed, was she one of these duo sexed ships. JS

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    Default Re: Use of Met. Office Volunteer Observers Logs UN IPCC

    "SS Maid of Kent " was the only ship that I sailed on that had it's own fan club , started when she was on the Dover run . These club members used to follow it around and do away days on it ,Quite an unusual ship in many ways , but a lovely old traditional Steamer . The Weymouth local crew doing one trip a day used to work eight to eight and get the bus home at night . We worked one of those days on two off , so actually did a twenty four hour week . On the crew roster I was on we burned fuel like it was free but always docked early at before seven . Our captain was always on the six minutes past seven bus home , he was a Coronation Street fan and had to be home on time , cost an extra tonne of fuel though . Those ferry days were another World
    Rob Page R855150 - British & Commonwealth Shipping ( 1965 - 1973 ) Gulf Oil -( 1973 - 1975 ) Sealink ( 1975 - 1986 )

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