Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18

Thread: Loading containers

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    South Shields
    Posts
    4,824
    Thanks (Given)
    464
    Thanks (Received)
    5489
    Likes (Given)
    3342
    Likes (Received)
    12905

    Default Loading containers

    Found this on the internet, how crane operators work loading containers on ships whilst sitting in their cabs 100ft above the ship, hope the video works.
    Rgds
    J.A.
    https://www.businessinsider.com/vide...1-11?r=US&IR=T

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Isleworth,London
    Posts
    666
    Thanks (Given)
    516
    Thanks (Received)
    815
    Likes (Given)
    2329
    Likes (Received)
    3368

    Unhappy Re: Loading containers

    Oowee ! - That's Not for me ! I used to get vertigo just climbing up into the cab of our 20 foot high Hagglund stores crane on the poop !

    Picture of an'Aggie'Hagglund.jpg That might be SWL 10 tonnes,but our stores' little Aggie' was 5 tonnes
    Last edited by Graham Shaw; 29th November 2021 at 05:29 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Torquay
    Posts
    10,391
    Thanks (Given)
    3204
    Thanks (Received)
    6783
    Likes (Given)
    10372
    Likes (Received)
    29192

    Default Re: Loading containers

    Surprising how many in the chartering Departments thought SWL was Swing With Leisure and trying to explain Union Purchase was like talking to the man on the moon, these were qualified shipbrokers ????????? ugh!

  4. Thanks j.sabourn thanked for this post
  5. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    W.A.
    Posts
    18,871
    Thanks (Given)
    10415
    Thanks (Received)
    10924
    Likes (Given)
    15397
    Likes (Received)
    58047

    Default Re: Loading containers

    This is why a lot of seafarers are very uncomfortable when talking with purely shoreside people. I know I am even to this day. I always get the feeling when they ask questions about ships there is something missing , and just put it down today as just pure ignorance, and find it very hard to converse with people like that. It is too late in the day to change their thinking for most of them , but do at times try if I see there is a chance of breaking through the granite. Seamen are best left talking amongst themselves and trying to bulls##t each other, they all speak the same language. JS
    A good example of this is where I reside at the moment it is a RAAFA retirement village and have been here just over a year. Within the first few weeks the phone rang from another resident in the village. An ex MN and RAN serviceman inviting me to join their happy band of ancient mariners . Seamen always seem to find each other by hook or by crook . I put a post about him earlier a Terry Rumens to see if anyone knew him from his early days at the training establishment most went to on this site , but his started in 1947. Unfortuanetley Terry has now to move into a home as getting too frail , his partner has now to decide whether to stay or go. She was his helper in more ways than one and things worked ok , both had lost partners years ago. This coming Thursday will be our usual happy hour meeting time , and those numbers will be significantly reduced . Like ships sailing into the sunset they carry the people with them unfortuanetley. Cheers JS.
    Last edited by j.sabourn; 29th November 2021 at 11:40 PM.
    R575129

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Sunbury Victoria Australia
    Posts
    21,386
    Thanks (Given)
    6578
    Thanks (Received)
    8453
    Likes (Given)
    89104
    Likes (Received)
    37201

    Default Re: Loading containers

    Imagine how the operator of the cranes goes when he is remote and thousands of miles away from the ship.
    Happy daze John in Oz.

    Life is too short to blend in.

    John Strange R737787
    World Traveller

  7. Likes Graham Shaw, Denis O'Shea liked this post
  8. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Isleworth,London
    Posts
    666
    Thanks (Given)
    516
    Thanks (Received)
    815
    Likes (Given)
    2329
    Likes (Received)
    3368

    Post Re: Loading containers

    Oh,those awful Box Boats..
    It would drive me mad -staring at multicoloured rectangular steel boxes for all of the duty.

    What am I thinking.? Of course that's exactly what I used to do for 8 hours every day on the bridge or more ,especially when your bridge-front cabin was also blocking out any shaft of daylight and your immediate view forward from your porthole was blocked by a creaking green ,with rusty patches rectangular 'box' with a serial number comprising four letters six numerals,and an identifying digit I fondly remember ABCU 123456/7 (not an actual serial number,just an example) ,and after watch ended and one came down to have a can of lager before turn in, I would swish aside my porthole curtain and say goodnight to Mr. or Mrs.Box - though perhaps these days containers might what what we might call gender-fluid? -'don't worry too much about me,I'm as 'sanely 'normal' as any seafarer,which is not saying much !.
    I'm only joking about the fraternising affair with that container,)but I'm trying to conjure up the 'view from my porthole' ,and how one had only a steel bulkhead and a gap of about 3 feet between self and a creaking monstrous mass of shivering tin containing cheap Chinese toys and fake Ming vases,or even an imitation European style people-carrier vehicle ,but with ghastly Oriental styling instead -usually something with unusually-shaped headlamps and a sharks-mouth grille,and with a name you can't pronounce or remember or write down-No,not a Nissan Cash Cow (Qashqai?-that's Japanese,and not bad,I'm talking about those from Beijing or Shanghai...

    I later sailed in large bulk carriers with of course unobstructed unlimited views from one's cabin-you could see the Chippy working (and bronzeying) up forward on the windlass,a quarter mile away ( slight exaggeration,but far enough ) , and you would need your binoculars to watch his facial grimaces as he slaved away and see what he was actually doing to earn his overtime.
    It was not bad on bulk carriers,but staring at empty oceans for weeks on end soon palled-and one looked forward(forgive the viewpoint pun again !) to getting into the thick of the traffic once more in Nippon or the English Channel,say.
    These days on container ships must be even worse,not only can you not see anything outside when you're off duty,but you don't even see your fellow shipmates !
    Last edited by Graham Shaw; 30th November 2021 at 08:43 AM. Reason: Tidying text

  9. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Torquay
    Posts
    10,391
    Thanks (Given)
    3204
    Thanks (Received)
    6783
    Likes (Given)
    10372
    Likes (Received)
    29192

    Default Re: Loading containers

    I did enjoy those long ocean passages, but not so much those across the North Pacific from Japan to Vancouver when you wondered whether or not you would see your bow again. Also enjoyed the traffic challenges of the English Channel and the Inland Sea of Japan (why they called it Inland, one will never know!) where every vessel was determined to get from A to B at full speed and had no intention of altering course to comply with the Rules of the Road, especially those vessels flying a white flag with a big red smartie in the middle.

  10. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Isleworth,London
    Posts
    666
    Thanks (Given)
    516
    Thanks (Received)
    815
    Likes (Given)
    2329
    Likes (Received)
    3368

    Post Re: Loading containers

    Ah So !Japan! There's a story somewhere,might be on this site perhaps, about the Tokyo Bay Traffic Management Authority becoming so concerned about the amount of vessels hitting and damaging their expensive channel buoys that they fitted a tank with paint spraying nozzle to each buoy so that if hit by a ship they got a shot of bright yellow paint around the point of contact to assist in any subsequent culpability investigation.
    Someone suggested that Everards try and get charters to Yokohama to give their ships a free hull touch up! For those who may be puzzled,Fred Everard was a well-known ,mainly coasting,British company whose vessels,because of their hull colours were known as 'Yellow Perils'....
    There's a link about Fred Everards I 've never seen before -HERE

  11. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    1,446
    Thanks (Given)
    7689
    Thanks (Received)
    4866
    Likes (Given)
    24342
    Likes (Received)
    28100

    Default Re: Loading containers

    was in the alurity .....small tanker ex empire domby ......good crowd old man had a heart attack...coming in the tyne taken ashore unconcious ...next morning down the jetty he comes ,,,as if nothing happened ...hard men ...cappy

  12. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Torquay
    Posts
    10,391
    Thanks (Given)
    3204
    Thanks (Received)
    6783
    Likes (Given)
    10372
    Likes (Received)
    29192

    Default Re: Loading containers

    Ah! the 'Speciality' my first experience of the coast after deep sea, quite a change, but a great learning curve, NO I was not on her when she hit the Argentinian vessel

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •