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Thread: The royal navy navigation way

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    Default The royal navy navigation way

    Read this post, bit dismissive of merchant seamen's navigation, try taking a vlcc into port or backing down for over a mile to reach Gillingham wharf on the tees.
    Rgds
    J.A.
    https://www.theregister.com/AMP/2021...gation_course/

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    Default Re: The royal navy navigation way

    And with a fraction of the wheelhouse personnel that is on a warship !!!, kt
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    Default Re: The royal navy navigation way

    Maybe that is why RN ships travel in convoy a lot, one is hoping the other one knows were they are going.

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    Default Re: The royal navy navigation way

    Is that why that Royal Navy ship ran aground on the rocks outside Norfolk Island and had to be carried home on a merchant ship?
    Des
    Lest We Forget

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    Default Re: The royal navy navigation way

    There was a post on her some time ago Des . And as I said at the time in almost the same position I used to anchor there for weather while on an Optus charter who wanted a seabed survey from Bondi Beach to Auckland . When the weather got too bad for dropping the gear over the stern and we were out of the steaming distance back to Sydney used to go for Norfolk Island , used to just move around the Island to different anchorages as the wind backed or veered. Always found the holding power quite good. Her C/O was ashore at the time , he would have been the first one to get a court martial which was automatic in the RN on the loss of a vessel.Even during the war due to enemy action. Sounds worse than it’s bite and is similar to a court of enquiry JS
    Last edited by j.sabourn; 26th September 2021 at 04:12 AM.
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    Default Re: The royal navy navigation way

    eeh, ba gum, them Navy lads are real smart ain't they, what would they do without twin screws, thrusters and a football crowd on the bridge, they have no idea about the limitations of merchant vessels, and that wee boatee he is on, has taken tugs to get into Plymouth, and the police boats never helped us in or out by clearing a path, what a disillusioned world he lives in. I met Admiral West in the House of Commons in 2008 and he told me he admired the way MN vessels came alongside with limited resources and kissed the quay and could never understand why his RN vessels loved to bounce off the quay with so many men at their disposal. I had the same remarks from another Admiral some years later when he was giving a talk called 'How to drive an aircraft carrier' at a Probus meeting. Something these RN guys forget is that Nelson us MN Masters on all his ships as his pilots in all his major battles, and it was small MN vessels that ran back and forwards from battles to UK to keep his vessels supplied with ordnance.
    Last edited by Ivan Cloherty; 26th September 2021 at 09:26 AM.

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    Default Re: The royal navy navigation way

    #6 you must have worked with the navy during the suez crisis Ivan so know they have a total different learning curve than the MN. I was out with another Master of a supply boat on 3 days trials in the Bristol Channel for trials we did 6 on and 6 off until the ship was accepted by the would be captain. We had bofors fitted on the wings of the bridge , portable machine guns which could me moved around . 2 FRCs for a marine detachment , All the cement and product tanks were taken out to give more cubic ,all void spaces such as unused ballast tanks were filled with ping pong balls of varying sizes to give her more reserve buoyancy if hit and holed. Of course the 3 nights out there in the dangeruous Bristol Channel . We lived in a make believe brothel as all the lights were red so as not to affect ones night vision . After all this dangerous stuff had been done and the aerial photos taken for I presume Janes fighting ships. The White Ensign was exchanged for the Red. Suddenly the bridge was full 6 matelots only this being a small vessel. And I called down to her commander on the phone he could now take over.
    Back came the reply just hand over to the coxn, so I did. I kid you not the RN is run by the POs . They are not like us they are all experts mainly in one sphere , we are stuck with them all. Bravely she sailed for the Falklands after the war was over. Cheers JS.
    Last edited by j.sabourn; 26th September 2021 at 10:07 AM.
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    Default Re: The royal navy navigation way

    Yes John, even in '56 it seems the RN had disdain for the MN, forgetting that in WWII without the MN they would have had no fuel of any description to carry out their fancy manouevers or have ordnance to use. We sailed alone from UK as our service speed 15 knots, altho could do much more. 11,000 dwcc with 6000 tons of high explosives, plus thousand steel jerrycans of aviation and tank fuel, plus naval shells. We picked up a RN escort (Relentless Class Frigate) at Malta, who signalled ' I will steam ahead of you at 13 knots do try and keep up' well this was a red rag to the Old Man (WWII vet) result was double ring down to ER and phone call 'I want all you've got' we approached the frigates stern at 18 knots passing so close you could have put a gangway aboard, he had to maintain his course and speed, as his options were limited, we got a message, 'point taken' we never received another signal about station keeping. We became Commodore vessel at Cyprus for the invasion, experienced a lot of RN bullmanure in Cyprus, the day after the invasion we were invited aboard a Coniston Class minesweeper, the atmosphere was less formal than aboard our own vessel and they dreaded being transferred to larger units

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    Default Re: The royal navy navigation way

    Quote Originally Posted by j.sabourn View Post
    #6 you must have worked with the navy during the suez crisis Ivan so know they have a total different learning curve than the MN. I was out with another Master of a supply boat on 3 days trials in the Bristol Channel for trials we did 6 on and 6 off until the ship was accepted by the would be captain. We had bofors fitted on the wings of the bridge , portable machine guns which could me moved around . 2 FRCs for a marine detachment , All the cement and product tanks were taken out to give more cubic ,all void spaces such as unused ballast tanks were filled with ping pong balls of varying sizes to give her more reserve buoyancy if hit and holed. Of course the 3 nights out there in the dangeruous Bristol Channel . We lived in a make believe brothel as all the lights were red so as not to affect ones night vision . After all this dangerous stuff had been done and the aerial photos taken for I presume Janes fighting ships. The White Ensign was exchanged for the Red. Suddenly the bridge was full 6 matelots only this being a small vessel. And I called down to her commander on the phone he could now take over.
    Back came the reply just hand over to the coxn, so I did. I kid you not the RN is run by the POs . They are not like us they are all experts mainly in one sphere , we are stuck with them all. Bravely she sailed for the Falklands after the war was over. Cheers JS.
    I was once having a crack with a fireman (mid 20s) who said he was a marine engineer in RN, I asked about their propulsion systems and he replied, I dont know, I just looked after two of those, pointing to the evaporators; I said well then you can pull the element on that one when we shut it down. After giving me a blank look, he said, well I only made sure that the water level was right, the artificers actually did all the maintenance work. I did actually sail with an ex RN "tiffy" and he was a good hand, unflappable and staedy.

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    Default Re: The royal navy navigation way

    I have posted before on a Xmas stay in a pub in Dorset, talking to a guy and his wife, and what we had done for work in his life, when i told him i had been in the MN, he then made the statement, he was in the real navy, my answer too him was what fuel did they burn in the RN,where did their food come from etc, he got the point i was making, the amazing thing i then learned, he had been stationed at HMS Mercury !!!, which for anyone not familiar is a shore based signal station, deep in the Hampshire country side. Most of them there did not suffer from sea sickness, kt
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