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Thread: International Nurses Day

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    Default International Nurses Day

    International Nurses Day which is held on the anniversary of Florence Nightingale’s birthday every year to celebrate the contribution that nurses make to societies around the world. The CWGC commemorates more than 900 nurses who died during the First and Second World Wars. Nurses served in all the major theatres of war and the Commonwealth home fronts. From tented hospitals within the sound of the guns, to busy base hospitals, hospital trains and ships, nurses were exposed to many of the same dangers as the fighting men they nursed. Here are the stories of some of the brave nurses commemorated by the Commission.

    Commonwealth War Graves Commission

    https://www.cwgc.org/learn/news-and-...3P3GeNVgJMzGQg
    "Our veterans did not forget about us .... Let's not forget about them." From Michael Levesque

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    Default Re: International Nurses Day

    I wanted to know more about Florence Nightingale. I was most impressed by the fact that during the Crimean War it organized the first care service for wounded soldiers. She was a very courageous woman.

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    Default Re: International Nurses Day

    Florence Nightingale was born in the Italian city of Florence, hence her name, while her parents were on an extended honeymoon. She is credited with founding modern nursing, and whose name is synonymous with excellence in health care.

    In her early nursing roles, her gift for organisation and getting things done were immediately apparent. Reports about the terrible conditions for the sick and wounded in the Crimea led to a public outcry, and as a result she was asked to go out there with a team of women nurses. They arrived towards the end of 1854. Conditions in the hospitals were so bad that soldiers were far more likely to die of disease than in battle. Her arrival was not welcomed, officialdom considering her an interloper. But as casualties mounted the services of Florence and her team were desperately needed, and she swung into action at the desperately insanitary hospital at Scutari (now called Uskudar), in Constantinople – modern day Istanbul. Florence began to clear things up, and improve conditions and standards of care. She worked tirelessly, carrying a lamp as she went on her night rounds in the wards. The soldiers loved her and the legend of the Lady With the Lamp was born. It was said they kissed her shadow as she passed.

    Reports of her work elevated her to the status of national heroine. The status of nursing was elevated as well.

    Not one for any fuss, she slipped quietly back into Britain using the name Miss Smith. During her time in the Crimea she had contracted "Crimea fever" and was to be sickly and sometimes bedridden for the rest of her life.
    "Our veterans did not forget about us .... Let's not forget about them." From Michael Levesque

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    Default Re: International Nurses Day

    Indeed in the current situation they are a breed apart and should be exhalted.

    One of the problems with the current situation of the Virus and the reason the western world has reacted in the manner it has is all to do with medical services, not the Virus alone.

    All countries are guilty of not providing a suitable medical service for their population.
    None have considered the aging population and their needs.
    Lack of hospitals and medical staff including doctors, specialists and nursing staff have put the system under a pressure it has never seen before.

    So yes the nurses are now the front line and can never be rewarded enough for the dedication they show.
    Happy daze John in Oz.

    Life is too short to blend in.

    John Strange R737787
    World Traveller

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    Default Re: International Nurses Day

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith at Tregenna View Post
    Florence Nightingale was born in the Italian city of Florence, hence her name, while her parents were on an extended honeymoon. She is credited with founding modern nursing, and whose name is synonymous with excellence in health care.

    In her early nursing roles, her gift for organisation and getting things done were immediately apparent. Reports about the terrible conditions for the sick and wounded in the Crimea led to a public outcry, and as a result she was asked to go out there with a team of women nurses. They arrived towards the end of 1854. Conditions in the hospitals were so bad that soldiers were far more likely to die of disease than in battle. Her arrival was not welcomed, officialdom considering her an interloper. But as casualties mounted the services of Florence and her team were desperately needed, and she swung into action at the desperately insanitary hospital at Scutari (now called Uskudar), in Constantinople – modern day Istanbul. Florence began to clear things up, and improve conditions and standards of care. She worked tirelessly, carrying a lamp as she went on her night rounds in the wards. The soldiers loved her and the legend of the Lady With the Lamp was born. It was said they kissed her shadow as she passed.

    Reports of her work elevated her to the status of national heroine. The status of nursing was elevated as well.

    Not one for any fuss, she slipped quietly back into Britain using the name Miss Smith. During her time in the Crimea she had contracted "Crimea fever" and was to be sickly and sometimes bedridden for the rest of her life.
    Thank you for more information!

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