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Thread: Disability and how we view it

  1. #11
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    Default Re: Disability and how we view it

    My youngest son is a registered mental health nurse, at the moment he is not in work, but recovering from throat cancer. He works in a place that is home to 6-8 adults with various problems, he loves his work, and as far as humanly possible these people are encouraged to lead a normal life. They go on holidays to the likes of Butlins holiday camps etc, and the public are by and large , brilliant with them. he finds that teenage girls will get up and dance with them, talk to them, and it is a joy to see. Myself and my wife have had a group here from time to time with my son, tea in the garden etc, and you have to be prepared for strange behaviour from them. On one occasion one guy, a big lad, just got up from the chair and went into my bedroom, and got into my bed with his boots on etc, gave us a laugh afterwards. I am very proud of the job my son does, and his residents are very well looked after, and treated to a good life, kt
    R689823

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    Default Re: Disability and how we view it

    ## agood thing to hear keith ...we all need help at times but sadly some need it most of the time...pleased your boy is on the mend best wishes cappy

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  4. #13
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    Default Re: Disability and how we view it

    some wonderful dedicated guys in those jobs , great unsung heroes
    Rob Page R855150 - British & Commonwealth Shipping ( 1965 - 1973 ) Gulf Oil -( 1973 - 1975 ) Sealink ( 1975 - 1986 )

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    Default Re: Disability and how we view it

    My eldest grand son is 13. He is a very good looking boy , blond and 6' tall , he is also unfortunately autistic.
    He was doing well at his school always at the top or near the top in all subjects. His problems began when teachers didn't recognize or refused to accept autism and it's affects.
    He was constantly placed in isolation or sent home for being disruptive. Most schools now are academies run by a board of governors and not answerable to the local council. They can exclude pupils who have special needs and have been accused of excluding pupils to maintain their grade and achievement levels.
    After my grand son was kicked out of his school his education and interest suffered until my daughter found another school who were willing to take him , although it is many miles from their home. He has now regained some of his lost confidence and is doing well with counsellors and teachers who understand his problems and are willing to take the extra time to help.

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    Default Re: Disability and how we view it

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Tindell View Post
    My youngest son is a registered mental health nurse, at the moment he is not in work, but recovering from throat cancer. He works in a place that is home to 6-8 adults with various problems, he loves his work, and as far as humanly possible these people are encouraged to lead a normal life. They go on holidays to the likes of Butlins holiday camps etc, and the public are by and large , brilliant with them. he finds that teenage girls will get up and dance with them, talk to them, and it is a joy to see. Myself and my wife have had a group here from time to time with my son, tea in the garden etc, and you have to be prepared for strange behaviour from them. On one occasion one guy, a big lad, just got up from the chair and went into my bedroom, and got into my bed with his boots on etc, gave us a laugh afterwards. I am very proud of the job my son does, and his residents are very well looked after, and treated to a good life, kt
    hi keith
    best wishes and thoughts for your sons health,
    as for his work, it is to be commended, as indeed all those others whom work tirelessly in their chosen profession which just happens to be the NHS , they should be given adequate reward for their service which in some cases borders on moral obligation from that individual and not just as a mere job,
    I would place my wife and her three sisters in the same bracket as they throughout their working life have spent it looking after others, and I know to do so it has to be more than just a job, it is a vocation
    tom

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    Default Re: Disability and how we view it

    And that Loui, Is where we all have to work together we know our own kids best, My Daughter had a job getting my grandson statemented with his Autism, It was only through persistence by all the family the young lad is getting his schooling and education in the appropriate system Terry.
    {terry scouse}

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    Default Re: Disability and how we view it

    Asbergers is another really not understood generally, but some very clever people suffer from that complaint. A good example is Chris Packham the wild life expert, does some brilliant programs on wildlife, and has also featured in a program on Asbergers.
    Some of my lads residents are really funny, in a nice way, i remember one whose name was Terry, came to me one day, and asked if i wanted tom see a magic trick, i said i would, he placed a coin in my hand, closed both fists, and said abba caddabra, go away, i opened my hand and the coin was obviously still there, the look on his face was completely at a loss. It was then that i realised that i had to make the coin disappear !!, so i quickly changed the coin over, he repeated the words again, and when i opened my empty hand, he said, ok worked that time !! Terry was in his 40s, but died a few years later, a likeable character, kt
    R689823

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    Default Re: Disability and how we view it

    With Chris Packham’s new documentary, Asperger’s and Me,He is a presenter on BBC T.V. he has been talking publicly about his struggles growing up undiagnosed and ‘a little bit weird’. Yet it’s precisely those unusual qualities that have made him what he is today: a celebrated broadcaster with an obsessive knowledge of the things that interest him and an ability to hyper-focus. Dismissive of supposed ‘cures’ for autistic spectrum disorders, Packham is clear that his Asperger’s is an intrinsic part of who he is, even in his darkest moments – he considered suicide on two separate occasions, the latter only prevented by the knowledge that he would be leaving his beloved dogs to fend for themselves. He says he would like to be free of the mental strains that come from living with Asperger’s, yet he is vehemently against any form of treatment that might remove his autistic traits.

    Renowned for his otherworldly appearance and robotic attitude when he first shot to fame, musician Gary Numan spent much of his early career struggling behind the scenes, unable to cope with the stresses and strains brought on by being thrust into the public eye, despite having done so quite willingly. Though he was never formally diagnosed with Asperger’s, he does, however, think it’s likely behind some of his quirkier traits. He said: ‘I had some problems during my school years and, after many trips to a child psychologist, it was suggested that I had Asperger’s. ‘I’ve never known for sure but I’ve always accepted that to be the case.’ He credits his wife Gemma with helping him to learn to understand himself and his condition, which he thinks has helped him succeed in his career. ‘I’m obsessive, but that’s a vital and useful trait for people in the music business. I’m driven and highly focused on things that I’m interested in, like my musical career.

    Motorcycle racer Guy Martin is one of the most popular people on television today, his awkward charm and straight speaking manner making him thoroughly entertaining to watch. Of his Asperger’s diagnosis, he told the Mirror: ‘It hasn’t changed anything, it just confirms why I do certain things in a certain way.’ In this now famous clip from 2009, Martin talks about making a cup of tea with an attention to detail that will be familiar to anyone with Asperger’s, or who knows someone with it.

    Although Hopkins wasn’t diagnosed with Asperger’s until he was in his late 70s, he acknowledges that it has had a huge effect on his life. And in an interview with the Daily Mail, he had more to say about the positives that can come from the sometimes unusual characteristics often found in those with Asperger’s. ‘I don’t go to parties, I don’t have many friends,’ he said. ‘But I do like people. I do like to get inside their heads. ‘I definitely look at people differently. I like to deconstruct, to pull a character apart, to work out what makes them tick and my view will not be the same as everyone else.

    Pip Brown, better known as singer-songwriter Ladyhawke, was – as so often happens – only diagnosed with Asperger’s as an adult, when she sought help for her chronic anxiety. She told The Guardian that despite being incredibly self-conscious most of the time, the second she gets on stage it disappears. While Asperger’s Syndrome is indeed at the higher functioning end of Autistic Spectrum Disorder, it shouldn’t be forgotten that those with the syndrome have had to struggle more in life than if they’d been neurotypical. Being autistic is tiring, because we are constantly trying to fit ourselves into a world that isn’t quite the right shape for us. But being autistic doesn’t mean lacking imagination, or ambition, or creativity. Sometimes our differences truly can be our strengths.

    Ten years after first blowing away the Britain’s Got Talent judges, Susan Boyle made a triumphant return to TV on America’s Got Talent: The Champions. The singer’s stellar performance of Wild Horses won her Mel B’s Golden Buzzer, and judging by her finale performance, she could be set to take home the top prize on next week’s show. In a first-look video obtained by PEOPLE, Susan wows the judges with a rendition of I Dreamed a Dream from Les Mis – the song that catapulted to fame in her Britain’s Got Talent audition in 2009. These are just a hand full of people who suffer from Asperger’s Syndrome. It should never be stigmatised and the more we encourage my grandson the more chance he has to succeed in life. And that's the attitude all of society should have Terry.
    {terry scouse}

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    Default Re: Disability and how we view it

    I find it difficult to have a conversation with my grandson. He answers with a yes or no and obviously finds it very hard to open up. He prefers the computer world to the real world, although I have read a lot on autism I don't know if this is good or bad. My daughter has said there has been a big improvement since he recently began seeing a counsellor who is also autistic. He has found an interest in art which I am happy about because this is one of my interests and perhaps something we can share.

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    I have to say thank you guys for making this post what it is, and for sharing details to all. What it has done for us is proof that talking about this sometimes taboo subject is good for us. If it is not spoken of we would never learn the importance of change. It is also very enlightening to find that one is not alone. Very famous extras to the list Albert Einstein, Sir Isaac Newton, Edison, Warhol, Beethoven, Bill Gates, Bob Dylan, Lewis Carroll and the list goes on. So not without hope given the correct care and needs being met. Best wishes to your son Keith for a speedy recovery.

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