Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Central heating

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2022
    Location
    Prenton
    Posts
    2,001
    Thanks (Given)
    262
    Thanks (Received)
    924
    Likes (Given)
    1657
    Likes (Received)
    3046

    Default Central heating

    Has anyone fitted a heat pump as there preferred method for heating their homes. The 2 types are Air source heat pump and Ground source heat pump.
    They basically work on the same principal as a fridge. The Ground source heat pump works the same way but is the more expensive of the two.Grnd.jpg because of instillation costs.

    https://www.britishgas.co.uk/the-sou...s%20into%20gas.

    How do air source heat pumps work?
    Air source heat pumps use the same kind of technology that keeps a fridge or freezer cool – but in reverse!

    The pump pulls in air from outside, then uses it to heat a special refrigerant liquid. As it warms up, the liquid turns into gas.

    This gas is compressed to increase its temperature – and provide lots of lovely heat for your home.

    Once the gas cools down, it becomes liquid again and gets re-used at the start of the cycle.

    The whole process only uses electricity and even works when it’s as cold as -15C during the winter.

    The science sounds amazing, but it’s not new. It was first described by scientist Lord Kelvin back in 1852, believe it or not!.

    Now if the heat pump is just a glorified fridge why are they so expensive? You can expect to pay depending on the size of your home anywhere between 3000 to 15000. You can get a new Combi gas boiler for 780 to 2800.
    Yes with both systems you may need to install more energy efficient radiators and obviously make sure your home is well insulated. Roof space and double /tripple glazing, and perhaps cavity wall insulation.

    The prices are as quoted from the UK company Valliant. There does not seem to be a great deal of difference in prices from other suppliers.

    I think at our time of life if we are in need of replacing the central heating system boilers I would be sticking to Gas or Oil units. Yes you are still at the mercy of market price increases.

    The reason I have posted this thread is today I was reading an article about the UK company Vaillant. They announced they are opening a new factory in Derby
    Last edited by James Curry; 30th March 2023 at 11:01 PM.

  2. Thanks Doc Vernon, happy daze john in oz thanked for this post
    Likes Colin McClelland liked this post
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Blue Mountains NSW
    Posts
    23,815
    Thanks (Given)
    43827
    Thanks (Received)
    12916
    Likes (Given)
    50901
    Likes (Received)
    38443

    Default Re: Central heating

    We have a Heat Pump on our Hot Water System here James, and like you say works like a Fridge, cheap as chips to run.

    Heating here is mainly Gas, which we have with Ducted throut the House, nine outlets! Not too bad on cost either.
    Cheers
    Senior Site Moderator-Member and Friend of this Website

    R697530

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Sunbury Victoria Australia
    Posts
    24,124
    Thanks (Given)
    7831
    Thanks (Received)
    9860
    Likes (Given)
    102439
    Likes (Received)
    43999

    Default Re: Central heating

    There is much talk here in Oz by the Greens about the value of heat pumps but as yet no indication to the public of what they are, how they work or what they cost.

    Most houses use gas ducted heating with the unit in the roof space, fitted with timers and thermostat.

    The number of houses with Solar is increasing bt causing problems.
    The Grid is designed to put power out not take it in as it does when there is a surplus.

    Figures out the other day show that the total amount of power generated by all Solar is only 14% of total power supply.
    Reverse air conditioners are much cheaper to install but a bit expensive to run.
    Happy daze John in Oz.

    Life is too short to blend in.

    John Strange R737787
    World Traveller

  5. Thanks Doc Vernon thanked for this post
  6. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    isle of wight
    Posts
    6,615
    Thanks (Given)
    2265
    Thanks (Received)
    5140
    Likes (Given)
    14878
    Likes (Received)
    23795

    Default Re: Central heating

    My son had a ground source heat pump, it was an ex council house, and the local council had fitted them to all their new council houses, i say council, but its housing assoc really. I had a bungalow with ducted air, cheap to run, but what a curse for condensation, every window running in it. i then had the usual gas boiler fitted and radiators, which largely cured the problem.
    R689823

  7. Thanks Doc Vernon, happy daze john in oz thanked for this post
    Likes Tony Taylor, Marian Gray, James Curry liked this post
  8. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    CHESTER LE STREET
    Posts
    2,132
    Thanks (Given)
    657
    Thanks (Received)
    1158
    Likes (Given)
    12139
    Likes (Received)
    7763

    Default Re: Central heating

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Tindell View Post
    My son had a ground source heat pump, it was an ex council house, and the local council had fitted them to all their new council houses, i say council, but its housing assoc really. I had a bungalow with ducted air, cheap to run, but what a curse for condensation, every window running in it. i then had the usual gas boiler fitted and radiators, which largely cured the problem.
    I have had warm air heating for 45 years Keith, no issues with condensation. The heating does not create the moisture that condenses, the moisture in the air will condense on the a cold surface; there could be several reasons why there was a problem, possibly the airflow was blowing onto your cold windows where with radiators it would be more static air flow, the moisture in the air has to go somewhere and will condense on any "cold" surface.

  9. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    isle of wight
    Posts
    6,615
    Thanks (Given)
    2265
    Thanks (Received)
    5140
    Likes (Given)
    14878
    Likes (Received)
    23795

    Default Re: Central heating

    Yes , agree Tony, one of the problems with this particular building, apart fro no double glazing , was it was a crap built place. The walls were made from Strammit board, ie compressed straw, i had never come across this material before, but of course the walls were always warm, so any cold spot was running in condensation. I cured the problems in the end, i moved !!. I had the electrician in to fit a new socket, you should have seen his face as he ended up with a large bucket of straw.
    R689823

  10. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    CHESTER LE STREET
    Posts
    2,132
    Thanks (Given)
    657
    Thanks (Received)
    1158
    Likes (Given)
    12139
    Likes (Received)
    7763

    Default Re: Central heating

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Tindell View Post
    Yes , agree Tony, one of the problems with this particular building, apart fro no double glazing , was it was a crap built place. The walls were made from Strammit board, ie compressed straw, i had never come across this material before, but of course the walls were always warm, so any cold spot was running in condensation. I cured the problems in the end, i moved !!. I had the electrician in to fit a new socket, you should have seen his face as he ended up with a large bucket of straw.
    seems a bit cockeyed of the architects to use build materials which have good insulation values and then fit crap windows.
    I often think that lots of these people come up with designs to win some sort of award or other. I often see these housing developments where I wonder how anyone ever gets their furniture moved in as there is no vehicle access for a hundred yards or more

  11. Thanks Doc Vernon thanked for this post
  12. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    isle of wight
    Posts
    6,615
    Thanks (Given)
    2265
    Thanks (Received)
    5140
    Likes (Given)
    14878
    Likes (Received)
    23795

    Default Re: Central heating

    I think most people suffer from condensation to a lesser or greater degree, even in small amounts, behind a wardrobe, or a bedside cabinet etc, even at night your breathing causes moisture. we sleep with a window open, only slightly in winter, but even then there are small amounts on the d/g window. To see some of the people featured in the news, its really bad, completely black mould .I see some people have triple glaze windows now, but there has to be a cool spot somewhere in a house, and you boil a kettle, the steam has to go somewhere.
    R689823

  13. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    W.A.
    Posts
    22,404
    Thanks (Given)
    12242
    Thanks (Received)
    13231
    Likes (Given)
    18281
    Likes (Received)
    73042

    Default Re: Central heating

    In meteorological terms , think that means all those people sufferering condensation have reached their Dew Point Keith. JS
    Definition of Dew Point .... the temperature at which air must be cooled to cause condensation. On a ship we knew it as rain. Cheers JS
    Last edited by j.sabourn; 31st March 2023 at 11:50 AM.
    R575129

  14. Thanks Doc Vernon thanked for this post
  15. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2022
    Location
    Prenton
    Posts
    2,001
    Thanks (Given)
    262
    Thanks (Received)
    924
    Likes (Given)
    1657
    Likes (Received)
    3046

    Default Re: Central heating

    The atmospheric temperature (varying according to pressure and humidity) below which water droplets begin to condense and dew can form.
    Could prove to be disastrous for the main engine in high humidity areas such as the Red sea and middles east especially in summer.
    On large Turbo charged slow speed 2 strokes water vapour entering the scavenge air intake space could remove the cylinder oil lubrication on the cylinder walls and destroy the liners due to excessive wear.
    Ways to avoid or limit the water ingress was to reduce the air cooler cooling effect and open the scavenge drains.
    The scavenge temperature 32degs C seems to stick in my mind. The air coolers were cooled by sea water passing through the heat exchangers. So the 32degs C sticks in my mind is likely because of the sea water temps in the summer months up the red sea /Gulf regions.
    I have been on ships were this condensed water was collected and tranferred to the Boiler hotwell or distilled holding tanks.

  16. Thanks Doc Vernon thanked for this post
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •