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Thread: The Merchant Sailing Ship

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    Default The Merchant Sailing Ship

    That was a trick question Doc. The G.F.A. was built as a barque and appears that way in all the photos. The vessel in your photo appears to be a barquentine. The shot must have been taken when all the spars on the main mast had been sent down.
    Bob


    NB This thread actually started by Bill. See his post down the list!
    Last edited by Doc Vernon; 28th June 2022 at 08:37 PM.

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    Default Re: On the Lines (Solved by James)

    Today people unless into the history of sail don’t know the difference between a ship or a barque or barquentine, schooner , ketch, or whatever. Those in shipping however should remember that a ship is a 3 or4 masted vessel square rigged on at least 3 of them. Each class of vessel due to its sail arrangement could sail closer into the wind than the next. In our modern power driven world for examination purposes the BOT had to assume when examining a candidate had to give a definite description of how close into the wind a vessel could sail and think it was 6 points into the wind. Which really is untrue as most sailing vessels could sail much closer into the wind than that. This question came into the orals and was termed how’s she heading , were the colour of a sidelight was given and the direction of the wind ,and you answered between the points she was on course for , whether running free or close hauled on which tack or even in stays. If one goes by the book as regards certification most of us have certificates in steam ships ,so going on a motor ship is not really kosher. However today I would imagine purely for not wanting to appear incorrect they call them master1 2 3 4 and 5. Which to me brings to mind false thoughts to those not understanding what they truly signify. JS
    The term ship I would imagine in most dictionary’s will give a vessel that floats in water. So unless you know different that is what people think. JS
    Last edited by j.sabourn; 28th June 2022 at 12:48 AM.
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    Default Re: On the Lines (Solved by James)

    Sorry JS, I don't want you to think that I am picking on you but I have to disagree again. If a vessel is shiip rigged it has 3 or more masts and has square sails on all of them. Three or four masts with a fore and aft sail(s) on the aftermost mast means that it is a barque.
    Bob

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    Default Re: On the Lines (Solved by James)

    Well you might be right or wrong ? But the definition given in the dictionary I used to have was a vessel with 3 or more masts Square rigged on at least 3 . Maybe it was a Chinese dictionary who knows . Cheers JS
    And to be schooner rigged was like most of us in earlier years . JS

    PS Do they still have that brothel in Mackay ? . Think it must have been the first legal one I ever saw, never went inside however. That was way back in 1953. The ones over here they take the tourists round. Wonder if they do the same on these ships tours in India and the likes ? JS...
    Last edited by j.sabourn; 28th June 2022 at 06:23 AM.
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    Default The Merchant Sailing Ship

    In the last quiz on a sailing ship, thread now closed.
    As to what is a "ship" or a vessel with sails.
    From the book The Merchant Sailing Ship ( A Photographic History ) by Basil Greenhill & Ann Giffard.
    The Full-rigged Ship : The full-rigged ship, or simply the 'ship' in nineteenth-century terminology, was the queen of sailing vessels, sharing with the brig the longest traceable ancestry. Square- rigged on all her three or occasionally more masts, with a gaff and boom spanker set from the aftermost lower mast. a full-rigged ship of the 1860's or 70's could and sometimes did set over thirty five sails.
    He lists eighteen types of various sailing vessels, down to a single sail.
    Bill.

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    Default Re: The Merchant Sailing Ship

    Hi Bill
    As it had gone off track i had closed it, but have now added those few posts to your Thread , unfortunately the order is not quite as it should be , but anyway good enough.
    A new Thread should have been started in the first place!
    Cheers

    So this thread actually started by you Bill
    Cheers and Thanks!
    Last edited by Doc Vernon; 28th June 2022 at 08:20 PM.
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