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Thread: BP Tanker Photos

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by claretfan View Post
    Hi guys, I sailed with BP in the 1970s and would dearly love to get hold of photos of the ships I was on

    Thanks Steve

    Hi,
    I have a couple of photos of BP tankers,if I can find them.While I look,here are three photos when I was at BP.the two coloured ones were taken on the Liberty.I'm in the centre of both.The black and white was theLoyalty.The two coloured ones were taken when we were on the Gulf to Satahip in Thailand milk run.I loved every minute,pick up in the Gulf,anchor in Singapore for 2-3 days then up to Satahip for a wild time.One photo was taken just after we had finished cleaning scavengers.Job and knock.
    Regards
    Hilton Stanness

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    Thumbs up Bp ships

    HI Ooor Wullie.
    What was the address for BP that you sent to for the ships pics?
    Cheers Des:

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    Cool British Resource

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Whitehead View Post
    Hi Dave

    I joined British Resource from Falmouth drydock in May 1960. Was this your timescale?
    Hi Ian.

    I only JUST missed you,I was on the Resource
    way back in 1953/54,was second steward.Just
    missed you at sea. I served from 1952 until 1959.

    Dave Williams(R583900)

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    Des,

    I suggest going here:

    BP

    using the category Press & Publications directory.

    When I enquired about the photographs of the vessels I sailed on, it was all done by email as I live in Canada.

    I remember it taking a little while but once I got a response the photographs were mailed out quickly.

    Give them a list of the vessels and when you served on them.

    Don.

  5. Thanks Des Taff Jenkins thanked for this post
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    I agree with you that the ss steamships site is one of the best for finding ships, have just got pictures of all my ships from there for my album " ships I have sailed in"

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    Hi Don.
    Sorry I'm late replying. but thanks for that address, will give it a try.
    Cheers Des

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    Quote Originally Posted by scott smither View Post
    Hi Philip , I'm trying to do some research into my wifes Grandad.

    HI i was on the dragoon in 79 and we did a salvage on a greek ship called christos bitas it was all in the news at the time i remenber somebody had the ships bell before the navy sank her after we had made her stasble.Might be where he got it from.Terry

  9. #18
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    Gulliver Guest

    Arrow BP Talk.......

    QUOTE by Terry Scutcher; ]Hi i was on the dragoon in 79 and we did a salvage on a greek ship called christos bitas it was all in the news at the time i remember somebody had the ships bell before the navy sank her after we had made her stable.Might be where he got it from.Terry.

    That was in reply to this by Scott Smither:-

    "Hi Philip , I'm trying to do some research into my wifes Grandad who was a captain (i think) for many years working for BP. He died several years ago and was known on his ships as DOW. His actual name was Dennis O W Jones from Wales. We have a ships bell that belonged to Dennis with the following enscribed on it " Asta Patria. British Dragoon - Britsh Promise 1979. The story as Dennis's wife recalls goes that Dennis was captain on one of these ships which in some way helped out the crew of the other. The bell is inscribed with the crew names and was handed to Dennis as a thank you.
    Does this mean anything to you ! I would be interested to know the story."


    Re the CHRISTOS BITAS
    At 1634 on October 12, 1978, the 15 year old Greek- flagged 55,000 dwt steam turbine tanker CHRISTOS BITAS (Europoort to Belfast) ran aground on rocks approximately 10 miles off Milford Haven, Pembrokeshire, Wales. After about half of its tanks ruptured, the tanker floated free of the rocks. The master of the vessel requested assistance from Her Majesty's Coast Guard in controlling the spilled oil, and the Christos Bitas continued for Belfast, its planned destination. The tanker was stopped at 52 25 N, 005 40 W at the request of British Petroleum Tanker Company, the owner of the cargo, and H. M. Coast Guard.
    The tanker was carrying 257,250 barrels of heavy Iranian crude oil. Approximately 21,990 barrels spilled into the Irish Sea. Nearly all the cargo was offloaded to other vessels, and the Christos Bitas was scuttled in the North Atlantic on October 31, 1978. Oil impacted some beaches in South Wales, as well as on Skomer Island, and the North Devon coast. Dispersants were used throughout the spill response, which lasted until November 13.
    Heavy Iranian crude oil has an API gravity of 31.0, and a pour point of -5 degrees F. The resulting oil slick off Milford Haven was approximately 6 miles wide by 10 miles long. Dispersants were used almost immediately, and the combination of the chemicals and the gale-force winds and high seas helped to break up the oil. Oil impacted beaches in St. Bride's Bay, on Skomer Island and from 30 to 40 miles of the North Devon coastline. Approximately 335 tons of emulsified oil and oiled debris were recovered in shoreline cleanup operations.

    On the morning of October 13 the vessel was listing heavily and H. M. Coast Guard began rescue operations. A British Petroleum representative arrived on the tanker to assess the situation. He suggested that three tankers would receive oil in offloading operations. Inspections revealed that the vessel was in danger of sinking, and it was decided at a meeting of the owner's agents and representatives from the Greek Embassy, International Tanker Owner's Pollution Federation Ltd. (ITOPF), the Protection and Indemnity (P and I) Club, the Ministry of Defense, the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, and the Nature Conservancy Council, that the ship should be lightered. In the early afternoon of October 13, British Petroleum contracted United Towing Ltd. to conduct salvage operations. The United Towing tug Guardsman began towing the Christos Bitas to a position that would minimize damage if a further release of oil occured. Skimmers and booms were brought to BP's Ocean Terminal at Angle Bay (the incident command post) in preparation for the possible release of oil. The Taurus arrived on scene on October 18 with two Oceanpacks, one Seaskimmer, one Midi-skimmer, and two Komara units.

    Pump specialists arrived with High capacity Mohn pumps from Rotterdam in the late afternoon of October 14 for offloading operations. Oil transfer to the ESSO YORK began late that night. By early the next day, the Esso York had received 9,849 barrels of oil. The Christos Bitas was now low in the water with the starboard side of its deck submerged. Air was pumped into intact tanks to make the vessel more buoyant. These efforts failed because the tanks were not airtight. On October 15, the Esso York departed with 13,965 barrels of oil onboard, and the BRITISH DRAGOON took its place in the offloading operations. The British Dragoon had airtight fittings that were installed on the Christos Bitas. Efforts to maintain air pressure in the tanks were then successful, and the tanker's attitude in the water improved. By the early morning of October 17, the British Dragoon had received 88,935 barrels of oil, and the Christos Bitas was upright in the water. Later that morning the vessels had to separate due to a storm. By October 20, 191,100 barrels of oil had been removed and lightering operations ended two days later. Approximately 7,350 barrels of oil remained on the vessel.
    Diving operations were conducted on October 22 and 23 to determine if the Christos Bitas was fit for towing into the Atlantic Ocean to the chosen sinking site. The diving operations suggested that the vessel was not as damaged as had been originally thought. Upon receipt of this information, the owners of the Christos Bitas requested time to consider repairing the tanker. Ultimately, it was decided to tow the vessel to the Atlantic Ocean and sink it. A site 580 miles from the Irish coast was chosen for the sinking, and towing to that point began on October 26. Weather worsened on October 30, and by the next day the tug was having difficulty making headway. The Christos Bitas was in an area considered to be a suitable alternative for a sinking location. The vessel was sunk at 51 22 N, 018 13 W in the afternoon of October 31, approximately 300 miles west of Fastnet Rocks, Ireland.

    (From the CTX-Centre for Tankship Excellence site)


    However...?



    Re the Ship's Bell:-

    Perhaps the bell is/was inscribed ANDROS PATRIA ?


    The master, his wife, their two year old son, and 27 crewmen were drowned after the 218,665 dwt Greek steam tanker Andros Patria was abandoned by most of her crew in the Atlantic Ocean off the northwestern coast of Spain on New Year's Eve, 1978. The Andros Patria was on a voyage from Iran's Persian Gulf terminal of Kharg Island to Europoort near Rotterdam loaded with 208,000 tonnes of crude oil, when she developed a 50 ft crack in her hull in very heavy seas and near gale force winds off Cape Finisterre in lat 43.31N, long 09.37W at about 1820 hours GMT on December 31, 1978. Then, some two hours later, following an explosion, a fire broke out in the crack in No 3 tank on the port side, through which oil was pouring out into the sea. After requesting immediate helicopter assistance, 30 persons abandoned ship, taking to a lifeboat, leaving just three men remaining on board. However, the lifeboat capsized throwing its occupants into the sea. None could be saved by the many ships that had arrived on the scene to offer assistance. The three who remained on board were airlifted to safety by a helicopter the following day when it was estimated that 50,000 tonnes of oil had been lost. The rough seas and dumping of large quantities of detergent by local vessels prevented the huge slick from reaching the beaches of Spain.
    The drifting tanker was then taken in tow, with neither the Spanish nor Portugese governments wanting the vessel in their waters for fear of pollution. The French and British also advised the salvors that they were refused permission to enter their territorial waters with the stricken ship.
    Towed to a position 250 miles south of Azores, and lightened. Got to Lisbon but was declared CTL and scrapped.

    (also from CTX Database)

    It would be interesting to know from someone involved if the British Dragoon and/or British Promise helped out in the lightening operation of this casualty,and which could explain the bell being in the possession of Dennis.

    Gulliver

    Last edited by Gulliver; 27th October 2011 at 09:15 AM. Reason: Final Spellchecking.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by scott smither View Post
    Hi Philip , I'm trying to do some research .


    HI.......whilst not directly of concern to your request above, mention of your wife's Grandad, DOW Jones, stirred memories.

    He was indeed a Master [Captain] with BP Tankers....and I had the pleasure of sailing under him, on the British Merlin.
    At the time I was a Navigating Cadet, on the above ship, from 8/1970 to 2/1971....and at some point in that timeframe, Capt. DOW Jones joined that ship. At the time, British Merlin was engaged in the UK-Scandinavia winter fuel trade....I joined her at Smith's Dock, Tyneside...

    At the time, I recall, as a youngster, Capt. Jones was an very kindly and understanding man....almost 'larger than life'....he took a keen interest in the welfare and learning, of the cadets on board......in contrast to some other Masters I sailed under....

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    Was on the Duke in 54 Not a bad old ship
    Mike Eadon

    ---------- Post added at 02:46 PM ---------- Previous post was at 02:26 PM ----------

    Would like to point out there are a great many BP ships at www.shipsnostalgia.com
    Last edited by michaeleadon; 3rd February 2012 at 03:50 AM.

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