Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 23

Thread: Timber carrier listing

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Sunbury Victoria Australia
    Posts
    20,298
    Thanks (Given)
    6271
    Thanks (Received)
    7709
    Likes (Given)
    80391
    Likes (Received)
    32633

    Default Re: Timber carrier listing

    Quote Originally Posted by Graham Shaw View Post
    Ah John the Angle of Loll (not Lol for any textspeaking young'uns reading in!)-or the Angle of Resting Membership,though to be fair at our age it's more like the Angle of Dangle... and the problem of Water Absorption can be mitigated ,to some degree,by use of a Rubber Sheet. Attachment 32566



    Saw one like that a few months ago here in Melbourne.
    My neighbor works on the cranes and tried to explain how tey get them off.
    Rather him than me.
    Happy daze John in Oz.

    Life is too short to blend in.

    John Strange R737787
    World Traveller

  2. Thanks Doc Vernon thanked for this post
    Likes thomas michael, cappy, Denis O'Shea liked this post
  3. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    4,700
    Thanks (Given)
    1953
    Thanks (Received)
    3050
    Likes (Given)
    9838
    Likes (Received)
    11397

    Default Re: Timber carrier listing

    The problem which has been seen on every ship that founders with timber is they where never built for the timber trade Palm Line, Elders, And a few more had there well decks loaded two or three high raw materiel's logs from Takoradi they where never supported by timber struts they where Timber General Cargo ships if you take a look at the latest in this thread, Accommodation Aft nothing ahead of it. Palm Line EDs and a few more had at least 2 well decks with accommodation midships, Raw materiel's where chained to the deck hatch coamings and anything else you could use the Bosun and Mate would walk the decks every day endlessly checking bottle screws chains shackles i cant remember a Palm boat ever foundering this seems to be a regular occurrence these days it wasn't so long ago the River Dance suffered the same fate after beaching of Blackpool these ship all have one thing in common,

    Vessel type: General Cargo
    There not built foe the timber trade and dont have to take a freak wave to bowl them over there decks and cargo are to exposed and to be honest if i was sent to sign on her on deck as soon as i saw the ships cargo and the way it was loaded and secured i would walk away from it. Take a look at the couple of pics posted the difference is there to be seen they where solid ships that ran the West African coast for years always last port of call before homeward bound Takoradi for logs on deck. Terry
    Attached Images Attached Images
    {terry scouse}

  4. Thanks Michael Black, Doc Vernon thanked for this post
  5. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    1,271
    Thanks (Given)
    7388
    Thanks (Received)
    4676
    Likes (Given)
    23025
    Likes (Received)
    26364

    Default Re: Timber carrier listing

    one thing comes to mind ...on a voyage from vancouver to sydney the smell from the timbers was like being in a green forest.....a calming pleasent aroma .....that is one thing that comes to mind as the logs were bleeding

  6. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    W.A.
    Posts
    17,338
    Thanks (Given)
    9465
    Thanks (Received)
    9895
    Likes (Given)
    13628
    Likes (Received)
    48770

    Default Re: Timber carrier listing

    #13 .Cappy green timber always expands and depending on its type will put out different smells I learned this by a friend of mine who followed me as Mate on a ship. The Maratha Envoy an Indian owned geared bulk carrier a 7 hatch job. Built so as to go with two holds empty if necessary. The ship managers decided in their wisdom that the two holds that could go empty they would put in car decks , fitted out to go on in the drive on and drive off principle that is with petrol in their tanks but loaded and discharged with ships derricks. They left a helluva a lot of the responsibility of building these decks in my hands in Germany a place called Nordenham . There were 7 decks in each hiold supported by steel uprights and I was quite proud of my achievement , extractor fans in holds and everything , every thing ok for the time I was there. About 12 months later I bumped into an old friend who had followed me later on the ship about 12 months later , and he told me the timber deck planks had continued to expand or grow and were approaching the stage where the ends would be pushing the shell plating out , and he spent months going around cutting the ends down with a handsaw. I hadn’t allowed for expansion. Told him it
    would be good exercise to keep his weight down. He’s still alive anyway and lives in Seaton Delavel . Cheers JS.
    PS it was always said at sea you should never leave a bad smell behind but in this case it was a genuine mistake. JS...
    PPS John #15;were those geared bulk carriers built by Mitsibushui of Yokohama ? JS
    Last edited by j.sabourn; 11th June 2021 at 01:28 PM.
    R575129

  7. Thanks Doc Vernon thanked for this post
  8. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    South Shields
    Posts
    4,795
    Thanks (Given)
    450
    Thanks (Received)
    5259
    Likes (Given)
    2866
    Likes (Received)
    11847

    Default Re: Timber carrier listing

    Lewis
    Very similar to the buries gearbulk ships but the ones I was on were built in Japan in 1969 and had 3 munck type H cranes. There were 3 sister ships in total, all built for a long term charter to CTC, a subsidiary of McMillan bloedel. 6 holds all built around the dimensions of the standard sizes of packaged timber, pulp and Kraft liner and paper rolls such that when loaded there was no need for dunnage and shoring below decks. They had the MacMillan bloedel insignia on their funnels. Originally the design was going to have slewing and luffing deck cranes but the charter called for gantry cranes so to accommodate the extra width required to fit the crane tracks and power supply cables for the cranes without changing the hold dimensions, the hills flared outward from the load line to the upper deck. Pilots hated them as there was no way the pilot ladder would lie flat against the hull so it usually meant that pilots boarded via the accommodation ladder aft. For Panama transit it required 6 pilots.
    The charter run was to load phosphate in Jacksonville for discharge in new Westminster, using hydraulic grabs fitted to the cranes, these grabs were stored in new Westminster between voyages but each ship carried there own yokes to attach the grabs to. Another cadets job was to run off the 4 wire suspension unit that all the forest products loading gear, stored in a big store underdeck forward of no.1 hold, and run on and fit the 2 wire hoist wires for the grab homes, a lovely greasy job. We carried 2 leckys one of whom was the designated crane Lecky who also looked after the paceco heads used when loading forest products, they usually split the work between them and were paid a bonus of, I think, $200 per trip. After discharge of the phosphate the charter called for at least one crane and one hold to be ready to start loading in Vancouver, the phosphate did not use every hold to bring us down to our marks so it was just the crane to get the 2 wires run off and the 4 wire timber frame on, again done by the cadets if carried. The holds and other cranes were made ready on the passage across to Vancouver island where regular ports were Harmac, Nanaimo, Chemainus, Port Alberni with occasional calls at Campbell River.
    Rgds
    J.A.

  9. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Carnlough
    Posts
    2,703
    Thanks (Given)
    1075
    Thanks (Received)
    1349
    Likes (Given)
    3310
    Likes (Received)
    5837

    Default Re: Timber carrier listing

    Thanks John, you jogged my memory there with the names of those Vancouver Island ports. Our first load port on the FP Clipper from builders yard in Japan was Port Alice, a one horse town with no horse. We had a great time there, a shippers party to celebrate our maiden voyage. There was us all decked out in our finery , full blues etc!! the shore side dignitaries enjoying the canapés and small talk lol. One of the ladies took a shine to our 3rd mate, nice lad from Lancashire. She was a rather large lady and had a mouth on her that would make a sailor blush.
    After all the pleasantries were over the 3rd mates new girl friend enquired from our Danish Captain what time does the pizz up start. Captain Munch looked a tad uncomfortable and offered to refill her wine glass, she declined and announced that the dockers club up the road was open and Friday night is party night. The senior officers were all Danish onboard, boring a holes really. So the 5 Brits onboard departed up to the dockers club. What a night, thankfully the ladies respected my desire to remain faithful to my wife and marriage vows. Others were not so lucky, I mean these girls were knuckle draggers. There was no cargo work over the weekend and so we had a day to recover from a great night in the dockers club. It was not until late Sunday night that we realised the 3rd Mate was missing. Anyway he turned up early Monday morning with the dockers who were mostly ladies and had been part of the entertainment at the club as well. He was rather dishevelled and walking as if he had been well and truly kicked in the nuts. The charge hand /ganger appeared in the mess room asking if Peter was doing the morning deck watch?? Guess who Peters girl friend was lol She said that he admitted to being virgin but that cherry has been well plucked now. Great days great times. One of the best trips and runs I was ever on sadly we never went back to Port Alice again. I loved BC and going up the inland water way and into the Prince Rupert was breath taking. Happy days.
    Last edited by Lewis McColl; 11th June 2021 at 01:36 PM.

  10. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    4,700
    Thanks (Given)
    1953
    Thanks (Received)
    3050
    Likes (Given)
    9838
    Likes (Received)
    11397

    Default Re: Timber carrier listing

    I would certainly agree with that Lew, I was spellbound by the scenic views of the ST Lawrence on the Empress of Canada got to be the most pictures' River in the world. Terry.
    {terry scouse}

  11. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Carnlough
    Posts
    2,703
    Thanks (Given)
    1075
    Thanks (Received)
    1349
    Likes (Given)
    3310
    Likes (Received)
    5837

    Default Re: Timber carrier listing

    The west coast of Canada has to be up there with some of the most fantastic scenery I have ever seen. Also going up the East Coast especially the Saint Lawrence seaway into the great lakes. I enjoyed Quebec city as well , Montreal did not float my boat. But sailing the great lakes was something else. Is it Lake Huron that has the 1000 islands I remember the sunsets being wonderful. Still for all that a sunset from Hoylake Wirral is had to beat can compare it with anywhere in the world would still get my vote.

  12. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Courtenay, Vancouver Island, Canada
    Posts
    2,056
    Thanks (Given)
    3181
    Thanks (Received)
    1788
    Likes (Given)
    16696
    Likes (Received)
    7335

    Default Re: Timber carrier listing

    I have often been asked. What brought you to Canada.
    My reply was. The scenery. Of course I had sailed up to Vancouver several times. Never really gave much thought to having to work. In those days there was lots of jobs available. I would never have gone anywhere on the east coast. Too many French, and too bloody cold.

  13. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    St Helens
    Posts
    350
    Thanks (Given)
    64
    Thanks (Received)
    247
    Likes (Given)
    18297
    Likes (Received)
    1036

    Default Re: Timber carrier listing

    #12 Terry when I was on Oguta Palm most of the logs were loaded in Sapele the local natives would bring large rafts down the creek and send them up and the Kroo boys from Freetown did all the deck and hatch loading there was some very heavy ones that were that were dodgy to sling and if slipped they disappeared and were lost they were known as sinkers and were usually the first ones to come aboard, we also loaded some at Calabar which we loaded ourselves because we waited a week for local labour who never turned up so skipper asked us to do it ourselves myself and the writer went down onto the raft and this is where my steel erecting days prior to coming to sea came in for slinging the logs ready for lifting. I got paid overtime and free ale for my troubles and a nice letter of appreciation from Palm Line for my efforts. Den

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •