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Thread: The bloody Battle of Kohima

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    Default The bloody Battle of Kohima

    The bloody Battle of Kohima during the Burma Campaign in the Second World War between British and Indian defenders and Japanese attackers.

    Told by a British soldier who was there, who reflects upon the bloodshed and the value of remembrance.

    "When you go home, tell them of us and say, for your tomorrow we gave our today."
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    BBC World Service - Battle of Kohima
    "Our veterans did not forget about us .... Let's not forget about them." From Michael Levesque

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    Default Re: The bloody Battle of Kohima

    My father was there and the only thing he ever mentioned about it was that the British troops and the Gurkhas were the only ones who held the line, the rest fled. historians and makers of what people want to hear as may have mentioned can always write and make history sweet smelling, sounds better in a lot of cases than the truth. The likes of the Titanic made into motion picture form showing in many cases pictures and scenes of stoic personal heroism, when in fact all I can see is a rabble of people trying to save themselves in any manner they can. Violent death is shocking in a lot of cases and unless you have witnessed it yourself cannot be described as anything but abondinable ( should be spelt the same as the snowman) the first thing that hits you is how weak and frail
    is the human body and how can big strong men be so easy to kill. Makes you realize how frail the strings of life really are. All the James Bonds are just peoples imagination at work and bears no real truth to the real world. The battle of Balaclava was 600 men going to their needless deaths probably on the whim of some self centred self gloirifying general. We are all mortal and as soon as the whole world believes that the better. Sometimes attack is the best form of defense and if hostile actions over North Korea come about this will be the case. The media make all sorts of noises and the people they call names can also read papers. The 2 koreas have been at war since the cessation of the armed conflict in 1953, a state of war has existed since then, which the media outlets always seem to fail to emphasise. There is always a price to pay in any war, usually the most innocent have to fork out for it. Cheers JWS
    Last edited by j.sabourn; 10th July 2017 at 12:08 AM.

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    Default Re: The bloody Battle of Kohima

    The Kohima 2nd Division Memorial is maintained by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission on behalf of the 2nd Infantry Division. The memorial remembers the Allied dead who repulsed the Japanese 15th Army, a force of 100,000 men, who had invaded India in March 1944 in Operation U-Go. Kohima, the capital of Nagaland was a vital to control of the area and in fierce fighting the Japanese finally withdrew from the area in June of that year.

    The Memorial itself consists of a large monolith of Naga stone such as is used to mark the graves of dead Nagas. The stone is set upright on a dressed stone pedestal, the overall height being 15 feet. A small cross is carved at the top of the monolith and below this a bronze panel is inset. The panel bears the inscription

    "When You Go Home, Tell Them Of Us And Say,

    For Your Tomorrow, We Gave Our Today"

    The words are attributed to John Maxwell Edmonds (1875-1958), an English Classicist, who had put them together among a collection of 12 epitaphs for World War One, in 1916.

    According to the Burma Star Association the words were used for the Kohima Memorial as a suggestion by Major John Etty-Leal, the GSO II of the 2nd Division, another classical scholar.

    The verse is thought to have been inspired by the Greek lyric poet Simonides of Ceos (556-468 BC) who wrote after the Battle of Thermopylae in 480 BC:

    "Go tell the Spartans, thou that passest by,

    That faithful to their precepts here we lie."
    "Our veterans did not forget about us .... Let's not forget about them." From Michael Levesque

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    Default Re: The bloody Battle of Kohima

    #3... My Father was at Kohima and the only thing he would say was that was where the japs were stopped by British and Gurgha troops, a lot of the others retiring. All these great battles and disasters seem to be to be displayed out of context in later years. The likes of the Titanic and some enterprising individual making a movie from the occurrence. I don't envisage people singing songs as the ship went down and the master standing on the bridge saluting, unless it be with two fingers saying to himself you won't get me at the enquiry. I see people scrabbling for their lives. The charge of the light brigade at Balaclava I see not as a brave unanimous charge into the barrels of field guns, but a huge mistake by some general who today would have been accused of corporate manslaughter if not murder. Today with the much publicised Korean Peninsula troubles never out of the press, this has been going on since 1953, this is what should be publicised more to let people who weren't even born then know about the true history of Korea. Let the press and media stop making stories about blood and war and pushing people into false premises. If everyone was put into warlike and disaster situations maybe they would realize their own mortality. There is very little between life and death. JWS. Apologies think I have answered twice and can't seem to erase. Seeing double in any case . Must be that bottle of Suntory someone sent js
    Last edited by j.sabourn; 10th July 2017 at 03:06 AM. Reason: Done twice

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    Default Re: The bloody Battle of Kohima

    well thats allright mentioning the suntory ......but what about sadjico the tranny ....oops sorry have sent that too late to stop it ......cappy

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    Default Re: The bloody Battle of Kohima

    Cappy if can send two answers to one post then there must have been two bottles. However am still searching for the first Sadjico, will withhold the fiirst bottle top as may be able to send you the two to have a sniff at. Will send them express mail postage to be paid by the receiver. If Sadjico turns up will send her to the doctor and will send you the results. Don't worry too much, she always said she liked sharing. Cheers JS
    Last edited by j.sabourn; 10th July 2017 at 07:53 AM.

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