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Rodney Mills
19th March 2015, 08:41 PM
I don't know what made me think of this, but I remember waiting outside the pub as a kid, while my step-dad was having his before Sunday dinner beer(s) in the Ivy House, on the 'front', in Southend-on-Sea, Essex.

I would have a lemonade, and sometimes a shandy, and a large biscuit and wait by the door.

About noon the singing would start. A lot of them were vaudeville songs like "There's an old mill by the stream, Nellie dee (sp.?)" And more modern songs in the vein of "I left my heart in San Francisco."

What songs can you load of boozers remember?

CHEERS...hic...Rodney

Keith Tindell
19th March 2015, 09:12 PM
I,m leaning on the lamp post at the corner of the street etc (george formby i think), and i to was supping lemonade outside, and a packet of Smiths crisps with the little blue bag of salt within,, KT

- - - Updated - - -

Also arriving home late for Mums lovely roast dinner, and the old man in the dog house, KT

Jim Brady
19th March 2015, 09:45 PM
I remember the sound of the piano accordion spilling from the pubs but I don't recall it ever being played to anything that you could recognise just a load of noise.The accordionist and his wife would always be invited back to wedding parties which were always held in the home not like some of the venues they have now where the price of a pint cost's an arm and a leg.
Regards.
Jim.B.

Keith at Tregenna
19th March 2015, 09:52 PM
I don't know what made me think of this, but I remember waiting outside the pub as a kid, while my step-dad was having his before Sunday dinner beer(s) in the Ivy House, on the 'front', in Southend-on-Sea, Essex.

I would have a lemonade, and sometimes a shandy, and a large biscuit and wait by the door.

About noon the singing would start. A lot of them were vaudeville songs like "There's an old mill by the stream, Nellie dee (sp.?)" And more modern songs in the vein of "I left my heart in San Francisco."

What songs can you load of boozers remember?

CHEERS...hic...Rodney

Most pubs we as kids had to stay outside,
the clubs differed much and most we played inside:
We had to be on best behaviour though, to be allowed back.

Strangely tell of home and have many tales,
as a kid then in my home in Wales:
Stories they did not tell loud, of a Uboat attack.

The accents and the singing were oirish to me,
then were many of the men, we were family,

Much I do remember though I was kid,
and should have writ all down, as they never did:
I will always remember the tales they told of the sea.

They seldom mentioned danger or atrocity,
many sang along to Irish songs of hope and family:

The accents and the singing were oirish to me,
then were many of the men, we were family.

Cover me in clover my grave should have been the wave,
my mates were lost with no shamrock on the grave.

As I grow now older, recall more of what they said,
Most was in reflection of the mates now dead.
They would agree with you and me and how we do endeavour,
to spare a thought for MN kin, from every port:
For ever and ever and ever.

The accents and the singing were oirish to me,
then were many of the men, we were family.

K.

Keith Tindell
19th March 2015, 10:10 PM
Jim, Slightly off thread, a docu coming on TV , a london guy who takes to the country side, one thing he says he does not missin London is the 5 pint of beer, what!!!, i would have to turn teetotal, KT

gray_marian
20th March 2015, 01:51 AM
It was very much frowned upon if my dad did this but I do remember sitting in his Consul? with my sister eating Smith's crisps and a bottle of something fizzy a real treat for us:D We were in the pub car park so didn't hear songs if any. As an aside we had a suprise party for his 60th birthday the usual crowd, his six brother in laws, respective wives and friends with one exception a widower who my mum felt sorry for. What a right pain in the bahoochie he was, every time someone sang a song and folk joined in this chap would bellow "One singer one song" Too many songs to mention except for my favourite, dad's best man, "uncle" George singing "Love is a many splendid thing" Happy days indeed.

Thanks for the memory Rodney.;)

PS, Keith #2,I still buy Smiths crisps complete with blue bag

happy daze john in oz
20th March 2015, 04:26 AM
It was very much frowned upon if my dad did this but I do remember sitting in his Consul? with my sister eating Smith's crisps and a bottle of something fizzy a real treat for us:D We were in the pub car park so didn't hear songs if any. As an aside we had a suprise party for his 60th birthday the usual crowd, his six brother in laws, respective wives and friends with one exception a widower who my mum felt sorry for. What a right pain in the bahoochie he was, every time someone sang a song and folk joined in this chap would bellow "One singer one song" Too many songs to mention except for my favourite, dad's best man, "uncle" George singing "Love is a many splendid thing" Happy days indeed.

Thanks for the memory Rodney.;)

PS, Keith #2,I still buy Smiths crisps complete with blue bag

Of course the blue bag if one has over indullged and is doing the washing can be a problem for some.

E.Martin
20th March 2015, 09:30 AM
One I can remember, I've got a lovely bunch of coconuts.
Me and my gal.
Bluebirds over the white cliffs of Dover.

Red Lead Ted
20th March 2015, 07:14 PM
The Liverpool pubs where full of wellers...........
WELLLLLLLLLLLLL WHOS SORRY NOW!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
WELLLLLLLLLLLLL THE BLACKBOARD OF MY HEART !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
WELLLLLLLLLLLLL WE WHERE ROUGH AND READY GUYS BUT OH HOW WE COULD HARMONISE !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
WELLLLLLLLLLLLL MAGGIE MAGGIE MAY !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
WELLLLLLLLLLLLL ITS NOT THE LEAVING OF LIVERPOOL THAT GRIEVES ME !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
WELLLLLLLLLLLLL HE IS MY BROTHER SYLVEST GOT A ROW OF 40 MEDELS ON HIS CHEST !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
WELLLLLLLLLLLLL THE BIG SHIP SAILS ON THE ALLY ALLY O !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
WELLLLLLLLLLLLL 4 IN THE MORNIN AND WHATS MORE ITS DAWNIN !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
WELLLLLLLLLLLLL THERES A TINY HOUSE, BY A TINY STREAM !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
WELLLLLLLLLLLLL I BELONG TA GLASGOW DEAR OLD GLASGOW TOON !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
WELLLLLLLLLLLLL OH DANNY BOY THE PIPES THE PIPES ARE CALLING !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
WELLLLLLLLLLLLL THANK YOU VERY MUCH FOR THE AINTREE IRON !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
WELLLLLLLLLLLLL SAILOR STOP YOUR ROAMIN !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
WELLLLLLLLLLLLL HOW MANY ARMS HAVE HELD YOU AND HATE TO LET YOU GO !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Everyone a gem, The Liverpool boozers had more pop stars than the Beatles. Regards lads Terry. :clapping2:

John Albert Evans
20th March 2015, 07:39 PM
I remember well my dad going into the pubs at night (I wasn't with him when I was young)but he used to play the piano and within minutes the crowd where singing. If he didn't know the song It was definately a case of you sing it and he would follow. One night he was playing in the Station Hotel, Shotton in the late 1940s when some chap asked him to play a song and he did. The man put a piece of paper on the keyboard which turnd out to be a 5. note, a white one. This was in the late 1940's that would be a lot of money in those days.

John

Jim Brady
20th March 2015, 07:49 PM
I've had a few pints in the Station Hotel John whilst waiting for a train back to Liverpool only to find I'd missed the one I meant to get so it was back in there for another one and another one.Train Shotton to Bidston,Bidston to Liverpool.
Regards.
Jim.B.

John Albert Evans
20th March 2015, 09:12 PM
Jim was it the Station Hotel or the Central Hotel, the Central Hotel was nearer to Shotton Railway Station it was called the Top Line its the one to Liverpool via Bidston. The bottom line Shotton Station was nearer to the Station Hotel, Holyhead to London via Chester. My mother was barmaid in the Central Hotel right up to about 1965, you never know she might have served you a few bevies.:)
Both pubs are still there, I went past them last month but the Station has changed its name now, I cannt remember what it is.

John

Jim Brady
20th March 2015, 09:48 PM
I imagined it was the Station Hotel John as it was right next to the station it was only for local trains.Quite a big pub had a food bar my wife had a chunk of roast pork crackling and crusty bread and butter last time we were in there.
Regards.
jim.B.

John Albert Evans
20th March 2015, 09:56 PM
That would be the Central Hotel then Jim, right next door to the railway station. Its the only one that goes to Liverpool via Bidston.

The Station Hotel (as was) Is quite a long way from both the top and bottom line (stations) as thay are called locally.

John

Louis the Amigo
21st March 2015, 06:01 PM
Hi shipmates, Singing in pubs? my old ship mate laurie had a great voice his time in the Merchant navy he sung around the world, in pubs for beer many times when his shipmates spent the money on drink , he would sing for a few beers his best one was in New zealand on a meat boat. the ship was The port phillip the new zealand farmers were great blokes very free with they money , and they bought himself and his ship mates beers as long as he sung, it was wartime and money was tight in them days for all crews . but My mate Laurie 88 years loved singing he only stopped a few weeks before he crossed the bar , he still singing in fiddlers green.

E.Martin
21st March 2015, 08:10 PM
I'd walk a million miles for one of your smiles my mame.
Ever body impersonated Al Jolson,

Rodney Mills
22nd March 2015, 12:13 AM
In 1984 my wife and I toured Eire by car. We'd seen the sights of Dublin, The Rock of Cashel, crossed the river Boyne, kissed the Blarney Stone (even though it's not the real one), hiked in Glendalough, and we were going around the Rings of Beara, Kerry, and Dingle. I can't remember exactly which of the Rings it was, but we had rented a B&B in a pub for the night in one of them.

We went down to the bar for a 'sup' before dinner, and I had a pint of Guinness. We were seated at a table adjacent to the bar when a young man entered and seated himself at the bar and ordered a beer. About ten minutes later the front door opened and a very big, florid faced man, dressed in a tweed three piece suit and hat and gaiters, strolled in and walks up to the young man and just stands there. The young man was about to have a sip when I guessed he felt a presence behind him and turned...and suddenly looked like he was scared to death. He literally jumped off the seat, knuckled his forelock and said "Good evening sir," and went to another seat.

"Himself", sat down and ordered a beer, apparently that was HIS seat. I remember this so clearly, as he was the spitting image of Victor McLaglen in the John Wayne movie "The Quiet Man."

Five minutes later another big man enters the bar, sat down at the end of the bar and ordered a pint. A gulp, and he sang a song. He'd got a really good "Public Bar" voice and at the conclusion my wife and me gave him a nice hand. Well, you would have thought we had passed gas in the Sistine Chapel.

The people in the bar stared at us, the singer also stared at us, and he's not amused; "Himself" turned around and gave us a glare, quite pished!

I have no idea what we did wrong, but unknowingly we had interrupted a feud or something. Anyway, I guessed they saw we were tourists and things calmed down. "Himself" had a swallow, put down his glass and HE starts to sing. Same type of a good public bar tenor voice. He ended the song, ordered another beer, and the first singer started up again, and they continued rotating songs. They never made eye contact during the time we where there.

An hour or so later "Himself" turned to us and said "Give us a name of a song."

My wife couldn't think of one so I said "The Wild Colonial Boy."

The whole bar erupted in laughter, and himself told me that he had better not sing that one. No explanation was given, but he was smiling as he started up another song.

When we left they were still dueling by singing, why I don't know. I wanted to stick around to watch the fight, it would have been a doozy...did you see.the film 'The Quiet Man"? The ten minuet fight scene between John Wayne and Victor Mclaglen is a classic. The only John Wayne movie I ever liked.

I later found out that the "Wild Colonial Boy" was the anthem of the IRA and was/is outlawed in Eire.

My last pub story, I drank a Guiness in "The Castle Inn" in Castlemaine, home town of the Wild Colonial Boy. "He was born and bred in Ireland, in the town of Castlemaine..."

Great memories.

Cheers, Rodney

Attached is a photo, not sure if you can make me out hanging onto the door of the pub in Castlemaine. And another of me having just kissed the Blarney Stone, dangling a couple of hundred feet from the top of the castle, leaning out over the moat to kiss a bloody rock... and me a former Englishman being securely(?) held by an Irishman. Go figure!

1759317594

j.sabourn
22nd March 2015, 01:48 AM
Used to be in the UK, don't know if law has been changed, but somewhere in small print around the entrance used to be "Licenced for the sale of alcohol, beer and spirits, and for the singing and dancing". Don't know if the Licence for such went with the manager or mine host or not. Only noticed this sign a couple of times when waiting for the pub to open at 1100 hours. Cheers JS

Keith Moody
22nd March 2015, 04:24 AM
JS, the licence is always with the landlord, thus if there is any trouble the landlord took the heat, the licences were issued by the courts following consent with the local council and the police.
my familey ran 3 pubs over the years from the 1920-1970`s. of myself and 3 sisters only one of the sisters was not born in a pub, 3 of us were born in different pubs.
keith moody
R635978

j.sabourn
22nd March 2015, 04:52 AM
Pubs were always used as reference points when directing someone who was looking for so and so. With the so called closure of so many hope they still keep their placards up so as people don't get lost. JS

Des Taff Jenkins
22nd March 2015, 05:06 AM
Hi All.
As many of you are in the same era where we used to sit outside the pub with a fizzy drink while dad had his pre Sunday dinner pint. me and my brother used to sit outside, but the one thing that used to worry me was if someone started singing, then they would all join in, and a wonderful chorus would ensue from inside the pub, beautiful Welsh music, I loved it but it meant my Dad would get another pint in, and it would mean being late for the lovely Welsh lamb roast my Mum would be cooking. Well it would always be warm in the oven, but that singing was something else.
Cheers Des

17595

happy daze john in oz
23rd March 2015, 05:46 AM
Well Rodders, in 1986 we went back to UK for the first time after coming here to live. We went to Eire to see the outlaws and and in a kilkenny pub with the brother in law we watched the band playing. My brother in law told some of the players we were out from Oz. They played the Wild colonial boy for us and the bar erupted. We then found out later that it is not considered' correct' to play it.s

Louis the Amigo
23rd March 2015, 08:41 AM
Hi shipmates.As I am passed my sell by date, I remember a few in the olden days, we had free entertainment in a many pubs , a group of brothers were very good played the spoons, washboard and one sung {Not very good} Keith my barry buddy did you drink in Canton? in llandaff road?

Neil Morton
24th March 2015, 06:11 AM
Re this Irish singing thing. I was in a pub just outside Goodwood during Race Week. I was on holiday with my wife 1983 and we had fancied a flutter and booked in for the weekend.Camped in an adjacent paddock were a group of gypsies, travellers they call themselves. Joy and I were seated having a pre dinner noggin when in walks half a dozen of these folk lead by a short nuggety fellow in a black overcoat and trilby carrying a whip. The sat quietly with their pints for a wee while and then began to sing in low harmony. Quite pleasant on the ear. A family group of much younger people sat across the room and as the travellers finished up they piped with something similar. The room fell into a tense hushed silence. The chap in the hat with the whip approached the barman and stated in a loud voice, "I am the seventh son of a seventh son and know things." Oh yes " replies the barman, "And I know if there is any trouble you had better make it quick cos the law is on the way." The men in the family group were on their feet and the wife and I were on our toes up the stairs out of the way. Next day the innkeeper told us it occurred every year between the two groups of Irish folk from the north and south of that country.

Red Lead Ted
31st March 2015, 03:00 PM
Here is a good thread, Singing in pubs. Go through the tags lads some other great stuff there, Pity its all in the memory and not reality Terry. :th_thth5952deef:

Liverpool – The Singing City | Liverpool Ships and Sailors (http://www.liverpoolshipsandsailors.com/2014/03/14/liverpool-the-singing-city/)

Dennis McGuckin
31st March 2015, 03:46 PM
Remember some of the best nights out in the pub, were the sing songs.Mate of mine had a great voice.
One ale house had a bottle of whiskey for the best singer of the night.
He used to win every week end.
Maybe that's why he was my best mate!

happy daze john in oz
1st April 2015, 06:04 AM
Singing Christmas Carols in the Juniper Berry in Southampton way back in the late 60's. A mixed lot, seamen, couples both gay and otherwise, all had a great time.

Dennis McGuckin
1st April 2015, 03:27 PM
Remember singing 'now is the hour' in a dockside pub the night we sailed.
Brings tears to my eyes!!

Captain Kong
1st April 2015, 03:41 PM
I remember in 1952 I was in the pub in Grangemouth, forget the name, was well known as the Roughest, Toughest Alehouse in the world,
They were fighting, screaming and fornicating on the tables, barmaids being thrown through windows if they were not on their backs on a table. Pint glasses flying all over. Never seen anything like it in the whole world.
Then a young 18 year old Salvation Army girl came in. She was selling the War Cry. [ enough war cries in the pub]
everyone carried on fighting and fornicating.
There was a spare table that a couple had fallen off, she stood on a stool that had not been throw yet and stood on the table.
She started to sing,.. "The Old Rugged Cross" and slowly it started to quieten down, then she sang "Rock of Ages" and the pub was silent, What a beautiful voice she had. She climbed down from the table and got her collection box out and collected a load of cash of all the animals in there. then she walked out. The fighting started again and the fornicating, glasses being thrown and barmaids screaming.
Back to normal.
Cheers
Brian

john gill
1st April 2015, 06:00 PM
The Liverpool pubs where full of wellers...........
WELLLLLLLLLLLLL WHOS SORRY NOW!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
WELLLLLLLLLLLLL THE BLACKBOARD OF MY HEART !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
WELLLLLLLLLLLLL WE WHERE ROUGH AND READY GUYS BUT OH HOW WE COULD HARMONISE !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
WELLLLLLLLLLLLL MAGGIE MAGGIE MAY !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
WELLLLLLLLLLLLL ITS NOT THE LEAVING OF LIVERPOOL THAT GRIEVES ME !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
WELLLLLLLLLLLLL HE IS MY BROTHER SYLVEST GOT A ROW OF 40 MEDELS ON HIS CHEST !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
WELLLLLLLLLLLLL THE BIG SHIP SAILS ON THE ALLY ALLY O !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
WELLLLLLLLLLLLL 4 IN THE MORNIN AND WHATS MORE ITS DAWNIN !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
WELLLLLLLLLLLLL THERES A TINY HOUSE, BY A TINY STREAM !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
WELLLLLLLLLLLLL I BELONG TA GLASGOW DEAR OLD GLASGOW TOON !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
WELLLLLLLLLLLLL OH DANNY BOY THE PIPES THE PIPES ARE CALLING !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
WELLLLLLLLLLLLL THANK YOU VERY MUCH FOR THE AINTREE IRON !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
WELLLLLLLLLLLLL SAILOR STOP YOUR ROAMIN !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
WELLLLLLLLLLLLL HOW MANY ARMS HAVE HELD YOU AND HATE TO LET YOU GO !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Everyone a gem, The Liverpool boozers had more pop stars than the Beatles. Regards lads Terry. :clapping2:

You missed out Mother Kelly's Doorstep Terry.

- - - Updated - - -


Remember singing 'now is the hour' in a dockside pub the night we sailed.
Brings tears to my eyes!!

Was that when they put the towels on Dennis?

happy daze john in oz
2nd April 2015, 05:21 AM
Remember singing 'now is the hour' in a dockside pub the night we sailed.
Brings tears to my eyes!!

So do tight underpants if you are not careful.

Captain Kong
2nd April 2015, 07:32 AM
Default Re: Singing in pubs



I remember in 1952 I was in the pub in Grangemouth, forget the name, was well known as the Roughest, Toughest Alehouse in the world,
They were fighting, screaming and fornicating on the tables, barmaids being thrown through windows if they were not on their backs on a table. Pint glasses flying all over. Never seen anything like it in the whole world.
Then a young 18 year old Salvation Army girl came in. She was selling the War Cry. [ enough war cries in the pub]
everyone carried on fighting and fornicating.
There was a spare table that a couple had fallen off, she stood on a stool that had not been throw yet and stood on the table.
She started to sing,.. "The Old Rugged Cross" and slowly it started to quieten down, then she sang "Rock of Ages" and the pub was silent, What a beautiful voice she had. She climbed down from the table and got her collection box out and collected a load of cash of all the animals in there. then she walked out. The fighting started again and the fornicating, glasses being thrown and barmaids screaming.
Back to normal.
Cheers
Brian


I lay awake all night thinking,
That Pub in Grangemouth was the ZETLAND BAR,
Anyone else been in there??
May not be there now, the customers would have demolished it
Cheers
Brian

Dennis McGuckin
2nd April 2015, 05:08 PM
I'm sure it was John.