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Thread: Tonnages

  1. #61
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    Default Re: Tonnages

    That reminds me of the Fire Service again Jim, would send the message back so many acres of gorse on fire, i haven't a blood clue was an acre looks like !!!! kt
    R689823

  2. Likes Jim Brady liked this post
  3. #62
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    Default Re: Tonnages

    I worked on a 5 Acre site approx 2 Hectare , 20,000 metre squared , one driver described it as being 10 x 10 , 10x 14 metre trailers by 10 x 14 metre trailers , I worked it out he was spot on so 1 acre is three lorries and trailers x3 lorries and trailers
    Last edited by robpage; 2nd July 2018 at 10:43 AM.
    Rob Page R855150 - British & Commonwealth Shipping ( 1965 - 1973 ) Gulf Oil -( 1973 - 1975 ) Sealink ( 1975 - 1986 )

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  5. #63
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    Default Re: Tonnages

    Reading back through this thread it stirred my memory of loading break bulk cargoes such as steel coils, heavy machinery in cases etc.
    Planning the stow you needed to know the maximum tank top load that could be taken for your vessel along with the maximum tank top point load. This is the maximum load your tank top can take at any given point and on break bulk vessels determines the dunnage you may need in order to spread the load. Pure container vessels are so built that the tank top can take both the maximum weight of the stack load but also the point load of the stack which will occur at the 4 corners of the lowest container in the stack. On the old CP Ambassador, ex Dart boat, both the tank top and hatch covers were in pretty poor condition and in the lay over in Montreal a gang of welders were employed patching up and welding doubler plates in the areas where the container feet sat or where on loading and missing the landing point they had punched a hole in the hatch cover. Those hatch covers see little paint maintenance done on them as 99% of the time they are covered totally in containers and their lashings and come in for lots of heavy knocks when loading and discharging plus often have standing water on them whilst at sea. Even the most modern Epoxy coatings have a hard time keeping intact over a period of time.
    Rgds
    J.A.

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