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Thread: Thanks for this Site

  1. #41
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    Default Re: Thanks for this Site

    39, I didn't post the details of the number of offspring here, and their respective mothers Ewen [only by email], mainly because it's a MN site and not sure whether Doc [moderator] would approve. Believe he's off this weekend... For the time being shall stick with the shipping lines till I hear different.

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  3. #42
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    Default Re: Thanks for this Site

    Sure, Marian. We can dialog offsite for the things that are less appropriate for MN.

    Ewen

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  5. #43
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    Default Re: Thanks for this Site

    This may be more appropriate, but more Royal than Merchant Navy. I have many Murdochs (merchants in Glasgow) and Wallaces in the family tree (one was a plantation owner in Jamaica). Maybe some of this could be confirmed or added to.

    John Mrdoch (1767-1781), parents Peter Murdoch and Isabella Campbell. He sailed from the Clyde in 10/81 on H.M.S. Hero, Captain Gordon, and
    never heard of again. HMS Hero was a 74-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, designed by Sir Thomas Slade and launched on 28 March 1759 from Plymouth Dockyard. She was the only ship built to her draught. She was converted to a prison ship in 1793, and was eventually broken up in 1810. Captain/Admiral Hawker, commanded the 'Hero' in the East Indies 1781-82; being present at the Battles of Porto Praya (16/4/1781) and Providien (12/4/1782). It is possible John Murdoch died during the Porto Praya battle.



    The H.M.S. Hero sank with all hands on December 25, 1811, when it ran aground on the Haak Sand near Texel, Holland. Apparently, she had progressed about 300 miles farther south-west than had the "St George" and the "Defence" in the convoy but, it was thought, due to a serious navigational error in conjunction with the bitter, storm force-11 gale [60 mph and more] was driven onto a notorious sandbank some 6 miles off the coast of Holland, near Texel island. This occurred early on Christmas Eve and she was accompanied in this extremely dangerous situation by an 18-gun brig-sloop, HMS Grasshopper [Cdr. Fanshaw RN]. The two vessels were stranded about a mile apart, barely in view of each other through the succession of heavy snow squalls that were sweeping across the sea area. The end of the large man-of-war and all 550 or more on board seemed to be inevitable. Occasionally the commander of the "Grasshopper" also trapped in the waters by Texel and his officers could see figures, agitated and gesticulating, running frantically in every direction, many climbing the stump remnants of the masts and along the few remaining lower yards that had been flung about at grotesque angles. It must have been in the early hours of Christmas Day that HMS Hero finally expired – torn apart by the angry elements, almost totally disintegrated. The planking of her upper decks and hull had been ripped off, her bow section broken away from the waist of the vessel, her three masts and their yards felled and swept overboard. The rampant sea had had virtually unrestricted access into the depths of the warship's hold, there to search out and destroy the few remaining souls who had taken their last refuge down there. By dawn everyone on board, about 560 people, had perished – her commander, Captain James N Newman, his officers, seamen and boys, Royal Marines, and the few women and children. There were no survivors. During the 72 hours following the departure of the convoys from Skagarrak waters on 22 December some 2,500 British servicemen – blue-jackets, and marines – had fallen victim to the cruel North Sea. As well as the loss of the St George, Defence and Hero there were several brig-sloops, a frigate and about ten transport ships wrecked. It was a major maritime disaster, ranking as one of the worst sea tragedies to afflict the Royal Navy in its long history. This is an edited version of the research carried out by John Seagrove, a descendant of Midshipman John Seagrove who brought the prize vessel back to Portsmouth, and published here by kind permission of the author. The full document can be accessed on the History In Portsmouth website.

    Also, James Ritchie Wallace (1792-1813), parents Hugh Wallace and Frances Ritchie.He was a lieutenant in the Royal Navy and perished at sea in 1813,
    unmarried.

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  7. #44
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    Default Re: Thanks for this Site

    Quote Originally Posted by Ewen Todd View Post
    Sure, Marian. We can dialog offsite for the things that are less appropriate for MN.

    Ewen


    Others on site and I will assist where possible to anything actually posted on site.

    Keith.
    "Our veterans did not forget about us .... Let's not forget about them." From Michael Levesque

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  9. #45
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    Default Re: Thanks for this Site

    Hi Ewen.
    Homside Convoy og 67 Sunk by U66 Richard Zapp on 19 July 1941.


    holmside.jpg

    Cheers Des

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  11. #46
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    Default Re: Thanks for this Site

    Good Morning Ewen, Nothing further to confirm the death of John Murdoch except to add he had 5 sisters & 4 brothers. His father Peter died on 11 May 1817 in Auldhouse, Lanarkshire, having lived a long life of 83 years. His mother Isobella
    died on 9 July 1802 in Calderbank, Lanarkshire, at the age of 64.

    As to James Ritchie Wallace (1792-1813) There is one born in Jamaica could that be him?

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