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Thread: The little ships.

  1. #11
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    Default Re: The little ships.

    Born in the war, my father stationed in Gibraltar.
    First recollection of seeing him I was about 5 and half.
    Put into Rolls Royce and driven around the streets of central London while mum and dad were in court getting a divorce.
    UI was 18 before I saw him again, and only two occasions after that.
    Happy daze John in Oz.

    Life is too short to blend in.

    John Strange R737787
    World Traveller

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  3. #12
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    Default Re: The little ships.

    I remember watching tugs towing lots of smart motor cruisers down the Thames and then later on watching the tugs towing a smaller number of dirty and damaged boats back up towards Richmond. It was a sight never to b e forgotten.
    Terry Sullivan

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  5. #13
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    Default Re: The little ships.

    Quote Originally Posted by DeepSea View Post
    Most people know the story of the evacuation of Dunkirk and "Operation Dynamo" and the incredible part played by the "little ships" but again the Merchant Navy seems to have been overlooked. Fifty three coasters, small railway ferries and paddle steamers made over one hundred successful trips to the beaches at Dunkirk, rescuing over 91,000, which was about one third of the total, with the ex Mersey ferry Royal Daffodil making seven successful trips, rescuing over 7,500 men, whilst receiving a direct hit from a Stuka dive bomber on the final trip home. Patching the hole up with mattresses, she limped safely into port. This was not the end of the evacuations either. Dunkirk was soon followed by "Operation Cycle" and "Operation Ariel I & II" where the Merchant Navy rescued a further 200,000 troops and civilians over the coming months.


    80th Anniversary Return to Dunkirk May 2020

    The Association plans to return to Dunkirk in May 2020 to commemorate the 80th anniversary of Operation Dynamo. It is expected that around 50 Little Ships escorted by the RNLI and the Royal Navy will take part in the Return.
    "Our veterans did not forget about us .... Let's not forget about them." From Michael Levesque

  6. #14
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    Default Re: The little ships.

    Des and Victoria.

    I doubt we could be related Victoria as My maternal family name of Moss is relatively new in the genealogical scheme of things.

    One of my interests is genealogy. When I started tracing my Moss roots I could not get further back than my maternal great grandfather, who I knew came from the Isle of Wight. I could find no Moss connection on the Island. I vaguely remembered an aunt once saying there was a terrible dark secret in the family. That we were Jewish. Quite frankly it didn't bother me if we were, so I didn't pay much mind to it. Now being involved in genealogy I suddenly was. I put on the thinking cap and started to think of a name similar to Moss that could be Jewish. I finally used the Moss letters as an anagram and I hit on Moses. I looked up Moses on the I.O.W. and found him, his father, mother, siblings and carried it all the way back to John Moses, 1550-1580, Brading, I.O.W. Hamps. my maternal 12th great-grandfather All the Moses' were christened, married, buried as Anglicans, a few Methodists here and there. As a matter of interest, I was able to trace one of the wives, a maternal great-grandmother's line, back to a 25th great-grandfather Peter de Alchorne in b. 1260 in Suffolk.

    My DNA results show I am 98% Southern English and 2% French. Perhaps the original de Alchornes was a soldiers that came over in William's army in 1066 and Explains the "French Connection.".

    All family names come from occupation, geographical locations, son of (Johnson etc.) and biblical names, Moses, Abrahams, etc..


    Meaning of the Name Moss:

    "Moss Name Meaning & Moss Family History at Ancestry.com®
    Moss Name Meaning & Moss Family History at Ancestry.comĀ®

    "Moss Family History. 14-Day Free Trial. GET STARTED. English and Welsh: from the personal name Moss, a Middle English vernacular form of the Biblical name Moses. English and Scottish: topographic name for someone who lived by a peat bog, Middle English, Old English mos, or a habitational name from a place named with this word."


    The conclusion of why the name was changed was my great-grandfather moved from the I.O.W. to the East-end of London in 1870. There was a large influxof Russian Jews into England following a pogrom in Russia. Most settled in the East End of London and became resented by the London locals. A assume this was the cause of the change of name from Moses to Moss.

    So Victoria, sadly I don't think we could be related. Shame, you sound like a very nice person who would have brightened up my family tree.

    Cheers, Rodney
    Last edited by Rodney Mills; Yesterday at 05:06 PM.

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