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Thread: The Difference between living on board to living ashore

  1. #11
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    Default Re: The Difference between living on board to living ashore

    I bet that wasn't a mail boat Chris
    Rob Page R855150 - British & Commonwealth Shipping ( 1965 - 1973 ) Gulf Oil -( 1973 - 1975 ) Sealink ( 1975 - 1986 )

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    Default Re: The Difference between living on board to living ashore

    The BOT bog paper was commonly known as union paper. Would not take any crap from anyone.
    That's the way the mop flops.

    My thanks to Brian for this site.

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    Default Re: The Difference between living on board to living ashore

    But living on board may have its benefits, on our recent cruise there was a lady and her daughter.
    They emigrated to Oz from South Africa in 1974, husband now gone, daughter divorced.
    The mother now lives on board on a semi permanent basis.
    Does about 10 months on board with a couple of months at the daughters for a break, said it is better and cheaper than going into a retirement village.
    Gets a reduced rate with all the 'extras' available.
    Has been onboard since last Christmas and will be off for three weeks in September then bank again.
    Happy daze John in Oz.

    Life is too short to blend in.

    John Strange R737787
    World Traveller

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  6. #14
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    Default Re: The Difference between living on board to living ashore

    Part of the rehabilitation that I did in 2016 involved hey rehabilitation centre that took up a floor of a three story building which had the first floor as retirement home the middle floor as a special floor for people with Alzheimer's and similar and the third floor was a specialist rehabilitation unit the rehabilitation alone at 90 an hour cost somewhere over 1,450 a week the rehabilitation part I can see but for the room and the three meals a day would an additional 1,500 a week as their standard charge so you're looking into going in the United Kingdom in a fairly reasonable standard of care and this was a care home not a nursing home so serious cases with the exception of the middle floor with the memory problems were not there is charging somewhere around 75,000 a year I don't know what a cruise ship charges but I would think that you would have good change out of that money
    Rob Page R855150 - British & Commonwealth Shipping ( 1965 - 1973 ) Gulf Oil -( 1973 - 1975 ) Sealink ( 1975 - 1986 )

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    Default Re: The Difference between living on board to living ashore

    Quote Originally Posted by John Arton View Post
    All of us, irrespective of company or trade, when at sea were acutely aware that there was a finite amount of stores and water etc. on board and if you ran short of an item it was not a matter of just popping round the corner to the local shop/supermarket to purchase a replacement. Even when making up purchase requisitions for stores to be sent off the head office, you were always aware of the zealous purchasing clerk with the red pen who would remove or cut down the quantity of any item he thought frivolous or excessive even though he most likely had no experience of life on board, he would do this in order to impress his purchasing super (who maybe had sailed) who had to sign off on the requisition, how many pennies he had saved the company.
    On board, even if you had a fresh water distillation plant fitted or a decent slop chest, you always made sure that you got the longest life possible out of your razor blades, squeezed the last bit of toothpaste out of the tube, only used enough shaving cream to give a decent shave, did not linger in the shower for hours on end, etc. You know the score. The only publications on board were supplied by HMSO or other Nautical Publications supplier. Log Books (Deck and Engine and Cargo), Bridge and Engine room night order books, bell books, compass error books, radar log books etc. If you needed scrap paper, unused crew lists, stores declarations, company letters etc. were torn up and placed on a hook consisting of a bent piece of wire on the chart table. Requesting scrap note books from the purchasing dept. would have led to that red pencil coming out and woe betide you ordering foolscap lined a4 books for use as sight books or diaries.
    Now
    After being forced to give up sailing due to ill health I had a couple of jobs before eventually retiring, one of which was lecturing in Nautical Science's at Shields College to O.O.W. (2nd Mates) and Chief Mates students.
    The amount of paper wastage was tremendous. Every student was provided with a full course notebook, I had to draw up schemes of work and individual lesson plans for each subject (Construction and Repair, Bridge Resource, Cargo Management etc. These had to be reviewed each term and updated as necessary with new handbooks being issued. When I sat in lectures for all my tickets I provided my own notebooks, took my own notes and drew all my own diagrams from what the lecturer gave us from his overheads etc. Occasionally we would be given some pre printed drawings as handouts to keep but they were few and far between.

    Contrast that to when I was lecturing to students for Chief Mates and I was asking them to copy a diagram from the screen I had put up, only to be told by the Head of Department that asking chief mates candidates to do their own drawing was a no no!!!!!!!!!

    Now
    Even a home, living with 3 females I find that I am going through an inordinate amount of razors, shaving gel and don't ask me about toothpaste!!!!! why cannot they learn to squeeze from the bottom of the tube?

    The razor and shaving gel consumption is down to them discovering fathers razors and gel are great for their legs, underarms and other areas so why bother buying their own.

    Then there is food and toiletries. Fridge is constantly stuffed full, loads tossed away as its sell by (not use by) date has gone, enough deodorant is sprayed around to cause a hole in the ozone to appear above shields and as for netty paper, forests are cut down to keep my lot in supply.

    Yes living life ashore is so completely different to what we lived aboard and if you dare mention the words "use less, or buy less" you are immediately labelled a "stingy old fart"

    rgds

    J.A.
    I didnt know you lived at my place John

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by robpage View Post
    If you fold the toilet paper into four and rip across the corner you'll find a very convenient hole in the middle if you use it like that with your fingers in the hole it doesn't half save a lot of paper
    Rob,
    that is known as the Indian method.
    However, you are wasting paper, the corner you tear off is meant to go into your shirt pocket. You use it later to clean under your finger nail.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Isaac View Post
    I remember a shortage of bog paper on one B&C ship and a notice was posted over each paper container in each head reading:
    "Members of the ship's company are asked to limit themselves to three pieces of paper per visit; one fore and aft, one athwartships and one polishing"
    Yes, I think it was in the Chief Stewards guide book, rough side for cleaning and smooth side for polishing.

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    Default Re: The Difference between living on board to living ashore

    If my memory serves me correctly B&C. whilst on leave from Clan Line paid a weekly allowance because they weren't feeding you.
    Vic

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  11. #17
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    Default Re: The Difference between living on board to living ashore

    A lady, Beatrice Muller made the QE2 her home for around 12 years, she did a cruise with her husband who died on board, so she said she did not want to go in a Retirement home, so she did a deal with Cunard and had a permanent inside cabin as her home, travelling around the world non stop, the very best gourmet meals the very best entertainment, laundry done, room service, etc ,much, much cheaper than a retirement home,
    When QE2 went into dry dock, Cunard put her in the Dorchester Hotel in London.
    She became a celebrity and was invited to every exclusive cocktail party, I met her several times there.
    After QE2 was sold in 2008 she transferred to the QM2.
    Her children would fly out to join her for their holidays so she was always in touch with them.
    Brian

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    Default Re: The Difference between living on board to living ashore

    Quote Originally Posted by John Arton View Post
    All of us, irrespective of company or trade, when at sea were acutely aware that there was a finite amount of stores and water etc. on board and if you ran short of an item it was not a matter of just popping round the corner to the local shop/supermarket to purchase a replacement. Even when making up purchase requisitions for stores to be sent off the head office, you were always aware of the zealous purchasing clerk with the red pen who would remove or cut down the quantity of any item he thought frivolous or excessive even though he most likely had no experience of life on board, he would do this in order to impress his purchasing super (who maybe had sailed) who had to sign off on the requisition, how many pennies he had saved the company.
    On board, even if you had a fresh water distillation plant fitted or a decent slop chest, you always made sure that you got the longest life possible out of your razor blades, squeezed the last bit of toothpaste out of the tube, only used enough shaving cream to give a decent shave, did not linger in the shower for hours on end, etc. You know the score. The only publications on board were supplied by HMSO or other Nautical Publications supplier. Log Books (Deck and Engine and Cargo), Bridge and Engine room night order books, bell books, compass error books, radar log books etc. If you needed scrap paper, unused crew lists, stores declarations, company letters etc. were torn up and placed on a hook consisting of a bent piece of wire on the chart table. Requesting scrap note books from the purchasing dept. would have led to that red pencil coming out and woe betide you ordering foolscap lined a4 books for use as sight books or diaries.
    Now
    After being forced to give up sailing due to ill health I had a couple of jobs before eventually retiring, one of which was lecturing in Nautical Science's at Shields College to O.O.W. (2nd Mates) and Chief Mates students.
    The amount of paper wastage was tremendous. Every student was provided with a full course notebook, I had to draw up schemes of work and individual lesson plans for each subject (Construction and Repair, Bridge Resource, Cargo Management etc. These had to be reviewed each term and updated as necessary with new handbooks being issued. When I sat in lectures for all my tickets I provided my own notebooks, took my own notes and drew all my own diagrams from what the lecturer gave us from his overheads etc. Occasionally we would be given some pre printed drawings as handouts to keep but they were few and far between.

    Contrast that to when I was lecturing to students for Chief Mates and I was asking them to copy a diagram from the screen I had put up, only to be told by the Head of Department that asking chief mates candidates to do their own drawing was a no no!!!!!!!!!

    Now
    Even a home, living with 3 females I find that I am going through an inordinate amount of razors, shaving gel and don't ask me about toothpaste!!!!! why cannot they learn to squeeze from the bottom of the tube?

    The razor and shaving gel consumption is down to them discovering fathers razors and gel are great for their legs, underarms and other areas so why bother buying their own.

    Then there is food and toiletries. Fridge is constantly stuffed full, loads tossed away as its sell by (not use by) date has gone, enough deodorant is sprayed around to cause a hole in the ozone to appear above shields and as for netty paper, forests are cut down to keep my lot in supply.

    Yes living life ashore is so completely different to what we lived aboard and if you dare mention the words "use less, or buy less" you are immediately labelled a "stingy old fart"

    rgds

    J.A.
    Marconi must have been the worst. Working out of the East End of London office when returning from South America on the SS Royston Grange I too a bus from the docks to the office at a cost of 1shilling and 3 pence. When putting in for a refund I was told that I could only get 1 shilling as the bus I had taken was the round the house bus that cost more. The tiny cheap Chinese screwdriver that had bent which I wanted changed was simply straightened and given back to me! Mike Spencer Junior Radio Officer at that time.

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  14. #19
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    Default Re: The Difference between living on board to living ashore

    The lady I spoke of with her daughter get special rates to stay on board for extended periods of up to nine months at a time.

    As to toilet paper, go for the Japan style.
    No need with them.
    On the side of the seat is a row of buttons.
    Red to warm the seat but be very careful how long you hold it down, serious burns for a delicate a*** can evolve.
    Then when done a flush., there are three styles depending on your gender, then a warm air blow dry.
    This is the ultimate was and blow dry. but no blow job.

    It has been estimated the average Japanese man only has sex about three times a year.
    Rest of the time he amuses himself on the toilet no doubt..
    Happy daze John in Oz.

    Life is too short to blend in.

    John Strange R737787
    World Traveller

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    Default Re: The Difference between living on board to living ashore

    Talking about bog rolls, one of the yarns I love relating to friends is that the MN-issue bog roll is wider with 1 inch extra on either side to allow for the roll of the ship. Most believe me, too.

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