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Thread: Disability and how we view it

  1. #21
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    Default Re: Disability and how we view it

    Quote Originally Posted by Louis the fly View Post
    I find it difficult to have a conversation with my grandson. He answers with a yes or no and obviously finds it very hard to open up. He prefers the computer world to the real world, although I have read a lot on autism I don't know if this is good or bad. My daughter has said there has been a big improvement since he recently began seeing a counsellor who is also autistic. He has found an interest in art which I am happy about because this is one of my interests and perhaps something we can share.
    I am no expert Louis and like you have done much reading on this subject. There are so many levels on the autistic spectrum making it very diicult to understand.
    i.e.( From low functioning to high functioning) Each individual seem to have their own special talent, likes and dislikes. I understand the frustration and anxiety caused to your family by the exclusions and the attitudes taken by some "educational professionals" ? We also have been down this route and find it etremely unpleasant, and tiresome. I am so glad that your daughter is strong and that he obviously has a caring family, without such the mind boggles. All comes down to money and budgets / lack of at the end of day. We have found that it is a continual fight to make sure that the relevant people do that which is required.In reply to the "yes and no" conversation this seems a normal "Trait" in some but usually they converse when they find something of interest. His interest in art sounds positive and your love of this could lead to many happy hours. Best wishes kn
    Last edited by Ken Norton; 8th February 2019 at 04:26 PM.

  2. #22
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    Default Re: Disability and how we view it

    Quote Originally Posted by Louis the fly View Post
    I find it difficult to have a conversation with my grandson. He answers with a yes or no and obviously finds it very hard to open up. He prefers the computer world to the real world, although I have read a lot on autism I don't know if this is good or bad. My daughter has said there has been a big improvement since he recently began seeing a counsellor who is also autistic. He has found an interest in art which I am happy about because this is one of my interests and perhaps something we can share.
    Louis,
    my youngest daughter suffers from bi-polar as well as other physical problems, asthma, chronic pain syndrome and a badly damaged knee which will cause her to collapse without warning. So I can relate to your situation to some degree.
    However the point I was coming to, she used to breed miniature pinschers and was highly rated by the kennel club; she gave a pup to a couple (both teachers) whose son was autistic and within a a few weeks he started making good progress and according to them it was down to having the dog. I dont suggest that it would be the same for all cases but they believed it did help in that he has something that was his and was not seen by him as anyway threatening.
    Sorry to ramble but I think in some situations anything is worth a try.

  3. #23
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    Default Re: Disability and how we view it

    We had a guy, about 30, down at the Community Center with Asbergers Syndrome though it was not until after his suicide we found out.
    Yet here was a guy with great skills, fantastic memory and love of music. Had a bit of a problem socializing and for that reason could not work.
    Many could not understand his ways but after his funeral when his condition was told to us by his parents we were able to have a better understanding.

    Very good friend of ours has a son with Nunams syndrome, sorry if spelling incorrect, this has caused his body not to develop as it should, so he is short in stature, has a speech impediment
    and difficulty in communicating, but is extremely affectionate.
    Goes all over the place on his own by public transport, has a black Belt in Judo and has two jobs, though not big ones. He washed dishes in the local chicken shop and packs books in boxes in another.
    But despite his challenges he is highly intelligent into cameras and electronic equipment far beyond that of most of us.
    Now almost 30 nothing stops him rom attempting all he can.

    Not disabled, not a freak, not to him a special person, just someone who is built a bit different and sees the world though his eyes not that of others.
    Happy daze John in Oz.

    Life is too short to blend in.

    John Strange R737787
    World Traveller

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  5. #24
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    Default Re: Disability and how we view it

    Many years ago there was a huge outcry buy builders in North Hampshire a local council had employed a lad with Aspergers and taking advantage of the fact that he had a phenomenal eye for detail and a photographic memory he was in the planning department they gave him the planning Rulebook to digest any plan that he opened and looked at in front that didn't comply exactly with all the rules here return them to the building contractor as being incomplete plans he did an absolutely Stirling job you couldn't have got a better person to do it it was ideal for him he loved finding the faults but the building contractors in that area were going crazy and shouting about taking unfair advantage of a disabled person but hey they got the building plans right after a few months of him . I think we all have a different version problems and things like that and where do you define what is normal my definition of normal is probably a long long way from people who are normally definition of normal but there again who says that they're normal
    Rob Page R855150 - British & Commonwealth Shipping ( 1965 - 1973 ) Gulf Oil -( 1973 - 1975 ) Sealink ( 1975 - 1986 )

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    Default Re: Disability and how we view it

    in Liverpool there was a carpet fitter with only one hand he was one of the best fitters you could have many home owners used the firm he was a very clever man always got over every problem laying flooring? true..jp

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