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Thread: Pleural Mesothelioma

  1. #1
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    Default Pleural Mesothelioma


    Helping Pleural Mesothelioma patients and their families find hope

    We provide free information about the disease, resources and support to help you understand, fight and overcome mesothelioma.

    Get Help Now

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma is a rare, aggressive cancer that develops in the thin layer of tissue surrounding the lungs known as the pleura.

    The disease is caused primarily by the inhalation of microscopic asbestos fibers. Once these fibers are inhaled, they can become lodged in the lining around the lungs.

    The fibers accumulate in the body, and cause cellular and genetic damage that can ultimately lead to cancer.


    It's the most common of the four types of mesothelioma, accounting for about 75 percent of all cases diagnosed annually in the U.S. More than 2,000 people are diagnosed with this pleural cancer each year.

    More than 2,000 people are diagnosed with this pleural cancer each year.


    A majority of these cases are traced to occupational exposure to asbestos, which put factory workers, shipyard workers, mechanics and construction workers at the highest risk.

    Keep in mind, it can take anywhere from 10 to 50 years after exposure for the cancer to develop.


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    https://www.pleuralmesothelioma.com/
    Brian Probetts (site admin)
    R760142

  2. #2
    Lewis McColl's Avatar
    Lewis McColl Guest

    Default Re: Pleural Mesothelioma

    Thanks Brian for this post and raising awareness of this terrible disease. I lost my best friend to this cancer 4 years ago now.
    He was an Electrician and had been working in the roof spaces of schools and hospitals and this is were he came into contact with Asbestos.
    Billy was only 63 when he crossed the bar, it was not an easy death. I sat with him at nights several times in his last few days so his wife and family could get some rest.

    It was Billy's passing helped me make up my mind about retiring a year before I intended.

    Who knows what tomorrow brings.

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