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Thread: Tonnages

  1. #61
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    Default Re: Tonnages

    That reminds me of the Fire Service again Jim, would send the message back so many acres of gorse on fire, i haven't a blood clue was an acre looks like !!!! kt
    R689823

  2. Likes Jim Brady liked this post
  3. #62
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    Default Re: Tonnages

    I worked on a 5 Acre site approx 2 Hectare , 20,000 metre squared , one driver described it as being 10 x 10 , 10x 14 metre trailers by 10 x 14 metre trailers , I worked it out he was spot on so 1 acre is three lorries and trailers x3 lorries and trailers
    Last edited by robpage; 2nd July 2018 at 10:43 AM.
    Rob Page R855150 - British & Commonwealth Shipping ( 1965 - 1973 ) Gulf Oil -( 1973 - 1975 ) Sealink ( 1975 - 1986 )

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    Default Re: Tonnages

    Reading back through this thread it stirred my memory of loading break bulk cargoes such as steel coils, heavy machinery in cases etc.
    Planning the stow you needed to know the maximum tank top load that could be taken for your vessel along with the maximum tank top point load. This is the maximum load your tank top can take at any given point and on break bulk vessels determines the dunnage you may need in order to spread the load. Pure container vessels are so built that the tank top can take both the maximum weight of the stack load but also the point load of the stack which will occur at the 4 corners of the lowest container in the stack. On the old CP Ambassador, ex Dart boat, both the tank top and hatch covers were in pretty poor condition and in the lay over in Montreal a gang of welders were employed patching up and welding doubler plates in the areas where the container feet sat or where on loading and missing the landing point they had punched a hole in the hatch cover. Those hatch covers see little paint maintenance done on them as 99% of the time they are covered totally in containers and their lashings and come in for lots of heavy knocks when loading and discharging plus often have standing water on them whilst at sea. Even the most modern Epoxy coatings have a hard time keeping intact over a period of time.
    Rgds
    J.A.

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    Default Re: Tonnages

    I thought the same. There was the SD14 and the SD16 which I was led to believe was Standard Design 14,000 tons and Standard Design 16,000 tons. Long time ago though.

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    Default Re: Tonnages

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Tindell View Post
    That reminds me of the Fire Service again Jim, would send the message back so many acres of gorse on fire, i haven't a blood clue was an acre looks like !!!! kt
    Well young Mary married a young country lad.
    Her father as not amused when he told her he wanted to be a farmer.
    The father then kicked him in the balls and said,
    There's a couple of acres to start with.
    Happy daze John in Oz.

    Life is too short to blend in.

    John Strange R737787
    World Traveller

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  8. #66
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    Default Re: Tonnages

    Sunderland was famous for many types of ship, not well known and I might have some of the facts wrong. But a naval architect at J L Thompsons in the mid thirties won a Cities and Guides competition for the design of a utility ship, the prize was 10 shillings. The design was laughed at because it was all welded and reported as not strong enough. Along came the second world war and the design found its way to Lord Beaverbrook who showed C Irving and the rest is as they say history.

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