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Brenda Shackleton
12th January 2019, 05:27 PM
I am looking at my Dad's log and in September 1942 his log says," Notice of liability served on Master and Owners S.S.COPELAND per S.U.B.O. Archangel "
I guess they were the Allied Forces but would like to know what the initials mean.
Any ideas,please?
Thanks
regards
Brenda

Keith at Tregenna
12th January 2019, 06:17 PM
Fire and Rescue Sub Officer (SubO)

Above is an example only, Sub Officer
may be an answer ?

K.

.

Doc Vernon
12th January 2019, 08:59 PM
Ships Under British Operations going to the port of Archangel Russia during the Russian Convoys. WW2

S.S COPELAND (Br)


1,526 tons
Built in 1923
Sailed in PQ.18 + QP.15 + JW.54A + JW.57 + JW.66 + RA.54B + RA.57 + RA.58 + RA.66


<tbody>

COPELAND (Br)


15


1,526


1923





RESCUE SHIP, 205 SURVIVORS


</tbody>



The PQ series began on 29 September, 1941, from Hvalfjord, Iceland to Archangel, Russia, and ran until 21 September, 1942, with convoy PQ.18.

The
Arctic convoys of World War II
were oceangoing
convoys (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Convoy)
which sailed from the United Kingdom, Iceland, and North America to northern ports in the
Soviet Union (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soviet_Union)
– primarily
Arkhangelsk (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arkhangelsk)
(Archangel) and
Murmansk (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murmansk)
in Russia. There were 78 convoys between August 1941 and May 1945,
[1] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arctic_convoys_of_World_War_II#cite_note-dt1-1)
sailing via several seas of the
Atlantic (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlantic_Ocean)
and
Arctic (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arctic_Ocean)
oceans, with two gaps with no sailings between July and September 1942, and March and November 1943





<strike></strike>

Captain Kong
12th January 2019, 09:35 PM
Soviet Union B. O.??

j.sabourn
13th January 2019, 08:55 AM
Ships Underwriter Board official. ???? JS

cappy
13th January 2019, 09:14 AM
I am looking at my Dad's log and in September 1942 his log says," Notice of liability served on Master and Owners S.S.COPELAND per S.U.B.O. Archangel "
I guess they were the Allied Forces but would like to know what the initials mean.
Any ideas,please?
Thanks
regards
Brenda

###senior zzz british officer

j.sabourn
13th January 2019, 09:41 AM
Union Cappy ? Maybe slater union board officer. I like Brian’s Soviet Union body odour. A notice of Liability could cover lots of things. As the owners of the Copeland at the time was probably the MOWT , it would really be their problem. The notice of liability could be for port and light dues. Was probably a normal part of the paperwork at the time. However can see how people would like to know. Think if it had been an official Russian Document would have been stamped with their own initials which was CCPPR or something similar, is what they stamped in British seaman’s discharge books every time I was in Murmansk. You were up there in the ore carriers have a look in the back of your book. Have you found that 3/9d yet, I also put in a tip as well. Be kind to Pat or she”ll thump you . Cheers JS.

cappy
13th January 2019, 09:48 AM
Union Cappy ? Maybe slater union board officer. I like Brian’s Soviet Union body odour. A notice of Liability could cover lots of things. As the owners of the Copeland at the time was probably the MOWT , it would really be their problem. The notice of liability could be for port and light dues. Was probably a normal part of the paperwork at the time. However can see how people would like to know. Think if it had been an official Russian Document would have been stamped with their own initials which was CCPPR or something similar, is what they stamped in British seaman’s discharge books every time I was in Murmansk. You were up there in the ore carriers have a look in the back of your book. Have you found that 3/9d yet, I also put in a tip as well. Cheers JS.

#####the only tip you left was take the caster of marys wooden leg then she cant run as fast when she goes for your wallet.....cappy

Brenda Shackleton
13th January 2019, 10:55 AM
Well, I'm none the wiser !

"Notice of liability..." etc was served by the Master and Owners of American Steamship,"Patrick Henry" They claimed damage to have occurred during transfer of one wounded American seaman from PH to "Copeland", alongside at sea on Sept 8th 1942. My Dad wrote in the Log ,"No assistance was rendered to any vessel ,or Owner, or Master ,or Crew thereof , on that date." Signed W.J Hartley Master . j. Armour. Mate. (That's probably because the date was 18th)............ Below a copy about the transfer.

From Commodore Jukes Hughes RN. Principal Sea Transport Officer
"Vessel was called upon to transfer a badly wounded American to the hospital on board, but owing to the attacks it was quite impossible to stop the ship, so Captain Hartley decided to run his vessel alongside the American at 10 knots and succeeded in transferring the patient in this manner- a feat that entailed seamanship of the highest order."

Now here's Dad's notes which will probably mean more to you Mariners than to me..........
"I signalled No. 43 (Patrick Henry) 'take in your starboard boats and maintain steady speed and steering. Have your man ready. I am coming alongside. I needed one wire rope; in other words a ' wire backspring' leading aft from the Forecastle Head to be made fast on No. 43. Mr Armour (Mate) thought that the backspring would spring back and break with a jerk. My plan was for the Carpenter to grease the bollard from top to bottom and there would not be any jerking or breaking. I could hold the ship alongside on that wire backspring. Our ship's engines would be doing one or two revolutions more than No.43 and this would enable us to remain and to stay on a tight wire rope until it was time to leave.
Having arrived opposite No. 43 it looked like they had carried out all the necessities very promptly and I began to move our ship very slowly broadside towards her and made contact easily without the slightest bump. The ship was quite steady being held by the wire backspring. The wounded man was carried out and was gently passed down over the rail to Mr. Armour and his assistants . He was taken to our little hospital where the Surgeon was awaiting him.

Finally from Arnold Hague, CONVOY RESCUE SHIPS p21. .....The man survived, it becoming apparent that he was the victim of a fellow crew member who had become mentally unstable during the air attacks, run amok and cut his shipmate's throat.!'
That's all , folks !

S.U.B.O. ?? Some sort of Headquarters in Archangel - belonging to the Allies, I think. Someone will know ! Where is Hugh ?
regards
Brenda

Keith Tindell
13th January 2019, 11:07 AM
Unable to help with the letters Brenda, but have to say reading that episode was one brilliant example of seamanship, ref Hugh, unfortunately no longer a member i believe, regards kt

j.sabourn
13th January 2019, 01:56 PM
Agree with Keith Brenda, in the. Days that your father went alongside another vessel in any sort of seaway with the ships equipment of those days in hand steering was a fete in itself.. Today one
Does such with more modern ships on the likes of seismic ships which fuel and store at sea whilst continuing with their work . However they have the advantage of calm seas otherwise wouldnt attempt , the seismic vessel is on a dead steady course and speed computer. Controlled
and you have Yokohama fenders down in case of any would be contacts As you say the supply vessel just normally uses a forward backspring amd keeps a slightly faster headway on the the supply vessel to keep the stern in. However your fathers manoeuvres were under much more difficult circumstances and obviously a well earned piece of seamanship and all merit to him. Regards JS. However still think your query has something to do with the insurance side of the business, even though there was a war going on it was still business as usual. Regards JS

Captain Kong
13th January 2019, 02:11 PM
Excellent report of Excellent Seamanship, Brenda.
Cheers
Brian

Red Lead Ted
13th January 2019, 02:24 PM
Have to agree with you J.S. I done a little digging myself and although S.U.B.O. Does not seem to give any abbreviation on the net, I find myself being directed to Insurers each search. Terry.

Brenda Shackleton
13th January 2019, 05:06 PM
hello,
I've had another thought about this and I think he meant S.B.N.O = SENIOR BRITISH NAVAL OFFICER (or OFFICE) . There must have been such a Naval base in Archangel. Thanks for all your input.
His Log writing is easy to read so I know that I haven't mis-read it !
regards
Brenda

Keith at Tregenna
14th January 2019, 02:29 AM
Brenda.

Found nothing else on this as yet.

K.

Des Taff Jenkins
14th January 2019, 02:35 AM
Hi Brenda.
It could be Soviet Union Builders Organization, as it looks like someone was claiming repairs done, maybe an Allied form of Lend Lease
Cheers Des

WG Smith
16th January 2019, 10:31 AM
Good morning

Having spent some time researching the Convoys to North Russia I would offer the following:

S.U.B.O. Archangel = SENIOR BRITSH NAVAL OFFIICER (SBNO)

Convoy PQ 18 was approaching the Murman Coast when the incident described would have occurred.

There were 40 eastbound convoys to North Russia excluding JW/RA 61A - repatriation of Russian POWs, and 35 return, westbound convoys.

The convoy cycle was suspended three times - after PQ 18 (Sept - Dec1942), between February and November 1943, and between April and August 1944.

Hope this is helpful.