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Peter Williams
9th May 2018, 07:13 AM
SHIPS NAME AND SERVICE RECORD

Full Name
Peter Williams Discharge Book Number
Lost Department
Deck Your Rank/Rating
Deck hand Which Ships were you on and When
MV Sappho 1962
British Faith 1963 Notes:
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cappy
9th May 2018, 08:04 AM
##was working by the british faith in62 at brighams in shields second steward got a whisper she was going for a long one .....didnt sign on .what rating was deck hand regards cappy

j.sabourn
9th May 2018, 08:39 AM
Don’t think it was in the Maritime Year Book Cappy. As BTC were I think federated ships if such was the case they wouldn’t have. However if not federated could call them what you wanted. I believe I am correct but stand to be corrected if not. Cheers JWS

cappy
9th May 2018, 08:57 AM
Don’t think it was in the Maritime Year Book Cappy. As BTC were I think federated ships if such was the case they wouldn’t have. However if not federated could call them what you wanted. I believe I am correct but stand to be corrected if not. Cheers JWS

###nearest rating i think would be DHU.....some of those lads had a hard time john as you will know ....one ex RN guy was treated badly ...the guy was ok it just didnt suit the crowd aboard that vessel ....cappy

Doc Vernon
9th May 2018, 09:49 AM
Thanks for the listings etc Peter
Where were you Born and what Year may be able to trace your Book Number
Cheers

j.sabourn
9th May 2018, 09:50 AM
We all know what and why the DHU rating was introduced or at least what we were told by the beurocrats. In theory it was ok but in practice did not take in the problems it could cause. A dhu was on about 10 shillings a month less than an EDH. If he did the same work as an EDH there was every chance he would be accepted with a decent crowd who saw him just as a late starter. However on two seperate occasions I saw 2 DHUs refuse to go aloft or go over the side on a stage, their argument they weren’t trained to do so. Safety is Safety but in most cases it was bull.... This caused discontent straight away. They were quite willing to take the money but in some cases not the job. Those who just mucked in as normal had more chance of being accepted. In Australia in my time here offshore they went on to 50 percent of an ABs or the new intergrated seaman’s wage for 12 months. Never saw any gripes here. Cheers JWS.

Frank Thorp
9th May 2018, 12:03 PM
I first went to sea in 1964. I was 23 and I had been trying for about 2 years to get a start. I wanted to work on deck but was told that due to my age I would be lucky
to get a ship. I would have to be around at a time when a ship was almost due to sail, and then I may get away as a DHU. In the end I asked at the pool If I would ever get a ship or am I wasting my time after 2 years. The man behind the counter asked me if I would be interested in working in the engine room. I took it thinking that after one trip I may be able to transfer to deck. I did 3 weeks at Newcastle Sea School. I stayed in the engine room for another 5 years and enjoyed the whole time . It is only now that I realise,, reading about how DHU's seemed to be looked on, that I am glad I did go in the engine room.

Regards.

Frank Thorp.

Keith Tindell
9th May 2018, 01:42 PM
If DHUs could do the job thats fine, i sailed with one who could only take a trick at the wheel when we were well out to sea, but it was ok for me to do the trick on the wheel as a SOS, mind you i was quite proud of that, even bring her alongside, but was p***** of to know he was on more money than me. I also have signed on as SAILOR in my book, i had enough time in to sit my ABs and wanted to pay off the ship, but the skipper said i will sign you on as Sailor, money just below AB, Our home port was Hamburg on that ship, and i was fraternising heavily with a young german lady, so did not really want to pay off, What lengths you will go to for young ladies in our youth. sure Cappy knows what i mean kt

thomas michael
9th May 2018, 06:08 PM
If DHUs could do the job thats fine, i sailed with one who could only take a trick at the wheel when we were well out to sea, but it was ok for me to do the trick on the wheel as a SOS, mind you i was quite proud of that, even bring her alongside, but was p***** of to know he was on more money than me. I also have signed on as SAILOR in my book, i had enough time in to sit my ABs and wanted to pay off the ship, but the skipper said i will sign you on as Sailor, money just below AB, Our home port was Hamburg on that ship, and i was fraternising heavily with a young german lady, so did not really want to pay off, What lengths you will go to for young ladies in our youth. sure Cappy knows what i mean kt

hi keith
with respect to all on the site, I in my humble rating sailed with a EDH Canadian whom just happened to be of the red indian variety and he couldn't tie a bowline, and that was on a stage over the side.
tom

Ivan Cloherty
9th May 2018, 10:08 PM
I sailed with a EDH Canadian whom just happened to be of the red indian variety tom

Hope you hid all the fire axes

j.sabourn
9th May 2018, 10:59 PM
For a DHU to come up and make a statement and say he wasn’t qualified to do a job is ridiculous. How does he think you get qualified ? By getting a big injection in the bum ? The only way you get qualified at sea the same as some jobs ashore is by doing it. Most deck boys I knew would jump at the chance of going on the wheel or going over the side on a stage. Safety was not the issue it was just being misused the same as it is today in a lot of cases. Safety like beauty is in the eye of the beholder , anyone today with the shortage of labour on a ship coming out with the same old worn out excuses would be lbetter off leaving their gear on the quayside as they would soon be rejoining it. Cheers JWS.

happy daze john in oz
10th May 2018, 06:35 AM
John, in our days I doubt the words OHS had ben invented.

On one of the UCL liners there was a leak up forward and the chippy said he could fix it whist the ship was at sea.
Wanted to go, over the side with a length of canvas which he intended to fit to the ships side, not sure how, saying this would reduce the inflow of water.
he never did do it but was prepared until told the leak would hold until next port of call.

Ivan Cloherty
10th May 2018, 06:58 AM
Elf n Saftee, wish we'd had them in the 1930's we could have told Hitler it was against the rules to make our houses disappear for HAS rules.

Glad they weren't around when I was at sea, would have missed the excitement of first trick at the wheel transitting a river or entering a port, climbing a mast in a gale, going overside on a Jacobs ladder over the bow, (bit different to going overside a pilot ladder midships), bilge diving (where was the excitement in that!), so many things we took in our stride as normal, but now need a 'risk assessment'

robpage
10th May 2018, 07:13 AM
I was watching the West Australian programme "Outback Truckers " yesterday , the owner-operator was resplendent in his hi-vis orange and blue reflective shirt , as he crawled all over his 50 metre road train, total health and safety , except for the leather sandals, flip-flop style

happy daze john in oz
11th May 2018, 05:29 AM
I was watching the West Australian programme "Outback Truckers " yesterday , the owner-operator was resplendent in his hi-vis orange and blue reflective shirt , as he crawled all over his 50 metre road train, total health and safety , except for the leather sandals, flip-flop style

Listen here cobber, we in the colonies are not bound by all this OHS crap.
We have to move the goods and that guy was over shod at the time.
These hi vis vests are now a fashion item so don't go giving him a hard time.

cappy
12th May 2018, 08:30 AM
Hope you hid all the fire axes

his name wasnt tommy hawks by any chance