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Doc Vernon
26th March 2017, 02:12 AM
22981
Rio de la Plata, Rio Jachal & Rio Tunuyan

I well remember this trio of passenger-cargo liners from their times along the lower New York City waterfront. They berthed at Pier 25, at the foot of Franklin Street in the City’s Tribeca district. By the late 1950s and as combination passenger-cargo ships, they had rather typical long stays in port – arriving on Saturday mornings and remaining alongside for six days, until sailing at 5 o’clock on Friday evenings. Pier 25 was not especially tall and so these ships – with their blue funnels and white superstructures – stood out. Operated by the Buenos Aires-based Argentine State Line, they were represented at New York by one of the port’s more prominent agents: Boyd, Weir & Sewell Inc.

j.sabourn
26th March 2017, 04:23 AM
Have often thought of approaching the owners of I believe the Seabourn Lines, Norwegian I believe and saying I am their long lost Grandson kidnapped by English gypsys all those years ago, who altered the spelling of the surname to avoid detection. Could take Cappy to vouch for me as he is of Nordic stock. Cheers JWS

cappy
26th March 2017, 07:19 AM
Have often thought of approaching the owners of I believe the Seabourn Lines, Norwegian I believe and saying I am their long lost Grandson kidnapped by English gypsys all those years ago, who altered the spelling of the surname to avoid detection. Could take Cappy to vouch for me as he is of Nordic stock. Cheers JWS####no prob john i willget you a job as ist oar ....just out of reach of the apple barrel and a stint on the drum every sunday at sea....and after 7 years in the galley rape and pillage once a month .....regards cappy the count

Ivan Cloherty
26th March 2017, 07:56 AM
####no .....regards cappy the count

Your spelling is atrocious!

cappy
26th March 2017, 08:14 AM
Your spelling is atrocious!do you mean the oar or the count

Ivan Cloherty
26th March 2017, 08:45 AM
do you mean the oar or the count

Goodness gracious me sahib, I had never thought of those two, honest! I meant the willget

j.sabourn
26th March 2017, 09:04 AM
Ivan, Cappy means the Bow oar which on the viking vessels they used to supply you with an arrow also so as to get the first shot in. that's where the term bow and arrer came from. The apple barrel only came into being on English ships when they learned to make cider in Zummerset. This could be an extract from the South Shields Gazette by their star Nautical reporter. JWS

happy daze john in oz
27th March 2017, 05:36 AM
John, I think you will find the apple barrel came into being about the same time as they considered starting UCL. The barrel was the fore runner to the first class winger.

j.sabourn
10th April 2017, 03:57 AM
A bit of now useless knowledge In 1963 By definition of the Ministry of Transport as I remember was . Emigrant ship ... Any vessel which leaves the UK carrying more than 50 steerage passengers or, any steam vessel which carries more than 1 steerage passenger for every 20 tons of her registered tonnage.
33 tons for a sailing vessel.
Passenger Vessel..Those carrying more than 12 passengers on International or Home Trade voyages. JS