PDA

View Full Version : Rms queen mary



John F Collier
28th December 2016, 07:17 PM
For anyone who may be interested, there is a one hour documentary on the RMS QUEEN MARY
at 22:00 BBC four tomorrow Thursday 29th. Cheers. JC

Captain Kong
28th December 2016, 08:42 PM
Thanks Johnf
I have stayed on her several times in Long Beach and was a member of the Queen Mary Foundation for a while.
I was presented with an Original piece of Teak Decking, engraved with the 70 Anniversary of her launch. Only one of four 4 pieces in the world, for some work I did for them.
She is well worth a visit if you get over to that side. and a superb Hotel cheaper than any LA Hotel.
I never sailed on her but In New York on the other Cunard boats we used to drink in the Crew Bar which was open to 10pm, 8 old pennies for a pint of ale then, before going across the road to the Market Diner for a 10 cent beer.
Happy days.
Brian

Doc Vernon
28th December 2016, 09:11 PM
That is a lovely piece of Memorabilia Capt
Must be worth a Penny or two by now! So hold on tight! LOL
Cheers

John F Collier
28th December 2016, 09:47 PM
I thought you might be interested Brian as I can remember reading your posts in the past about her, she is a grand
old lady and if I ever did go to the states she would be right up there on my must do list. As you say happy days, indeed
they were and the memories are "not too bad either" :thumbsup: you must be very proud of that piece of teak decking,
with there being only four pieces in the world, Happy New Year, all the best. JC

Richard Quartermaine
28th December 2016, 10:34 PM
I hope it comes here Johnf. I'll keep a lookout for it.
Have a great New Year, Shipmates.
Richard

John F Collier
28th December 2016, 11:33 PM
I hope it comes here Johnf. I'll keep a lookout for it.
Have a great New Year, Shipmates.
Richard

Hi Richard, hope you had a good Christmas and wish you and yours a very happy and healthy 2017, all the best. JohnF

Richard Quartermaine
29th December 2016, 10:24 AM
Just a quiet one this year JohnF with Margaret and Yoshi but a one hour video skype call from my son Rick and his Dixie lady love in South Carolina just before lunch was really nice. To you and yours every good wish for for the whole new year and here's a video just arrived from my Aussie assistant who was with me in Suva, Fiji in the early sixties to get the ball rolling.
Cheers, Richard
VID-20161105-WA00161.mp4 Drat! Not working

cappy
29th December 2016, 10:39 AM
Just a quiet one this year JohnF with Margaret and Yoshi but a one hour video skype call from my son Rick and his Dixie lady love in South Carolina just before lunch was really nice. To you and yours every good wish for for the whole new year and here's a video just arrived from my Aussie assistant who was with me in Suva, Fiji in the early sixties to get the ball rolling.
Cheers, Richard
VID-20161105-WA00161.mp4 Drat! Not workingnice picture of yoshi richard ....all the best cappy

John F Collier
29th December 2016, 01:54 PM
#7, Thanks Richard, shame about the video sounds like it was a good one, that picture of Yoshi is like looking at
Chewbacca "of Star Wars fame" :) , he looks a lovely dog, take care. All the best, JohnF

Richard Quartermaine
29th December 2016, 10:04 PM
JohnF, as a mate he's simply out of this world. Cheers, Richard

Captain Kong
30th December 2016, 09:26 AM
It was a good show last night.

What happened to all that ship building, up to 40 ship building yards on the Clyde in the 30s, All Gone. Gemans build them now.
saw a friend on there, Geoffery Le Marquand of Southampton and the Vindicatrix Association spoke about her at one of the Re Unions.
22,000 British girls were taken on her to the States after the war ended for the American Soldiers., no wonder I couldn't get a bit, there were none left for us.
Over Here, Over Paid and Over Sexed.
Cheers
Brian

Ivan Cloherty
30th December 2016, 09:31 PM
Hmmm! 'Britain's Navy's biggest ship!' you live and learn

20 miles to stop! bit of poetic licence there methinks

Richard Quartermaine
30th December 2016, 10:09 PM
In January 1947, my first trip, The 24 passenger/cargo Port Line ship MV Lowlander sailed out of Newcastle, New South Wales for New York. On Board were 24 Aussie war brides. Got our own back, Brian. My son Rick's gal in S.C. USA is all American and a real sweetie pie. They were on our Skype video last Sunday for an hour.
Here are some photos of the Crossing the Line Ceremony and the Lowlander later in Nova Scotia before the paint job. She got quite a thrashing off Cape Hatteras.
Best wishes to you, Anne and clan for 2017 and beyond.
Richard

Captain Kong
30th December 2016, 11:39 PM
and all the very Best wishes for the New Year to you and yours. Richard. we may meet again one day.

Cheers
Brian

j.sabourn
31st December 2016, 06:44 AM
#12,,,,20 miles to stop sounds a bit sus. Maybe could be from full ahead to stop, might carry that headway, still a bit sus. Quickest way to bring a big ship to stop without going astern. Is from Full ahead, to Half ahead for a timed limit, then to Slow ahead, and dead Slow ahead, could usually bring most big ships up within 7 miles. For those who remember that first engine movement was EOP ( end of passage ) everything after was HST ( harbour Steaming Time ) which could start a long way from the shore. JS

Captain Kong
31st December 2016, 09:31 AM
I could stop a 300,000 ton VLCC in six tenths of One Mile. 6 cables. and NOT touch the engines going at Full Ahead.

Hard a starboard, alter course by 90 degrees, the ship will still carry on its course due to the momentum for 6 cables. then stop in the water before it actually moves onto the new course. Then just pull the lever back and the ship has stopped dead in the water, simple.
The ship would be beam onto its course, 1200 feet in length and a 90 foot draft so a BIG cushion against the sea.
We practiced this several times also when doing the Williamson Turn. A man overboard position in 20 minutes.
Cheers
Brian

j.sabourn
31st December 2016, 10:45 AM
You spilt the Chiefs tea Brian, and he cant find his piece of cake. Would try in the Manchester ship canal if still at sea. Cheers Happy new year JS

John Arton
31st December 2016, 12:12 PM
Brian
Guess your VLCC's were motor ships.
With the Queen Mary being steam turbine it is almost impossible to use the astern turbine (its usually only 50% of the ahead turbine power) unless you are doing a crash stop and to hell with any damage to the turbines.
I could quite imagine a fine lined turbine driven vessel such as the Queen Mary taking up to 7 miles to come to a complete halt if reducing speed in normal circumstances. As a junior watch keeper on the Empress it was drummed into us to avoid having to use the telegraphs at sea and rely on course alterations to avoid other vessels. Sudden reductions of turbine R.P.M. can put heavy loads on the steam plant as all of a sudden the need for steam is drastically reduced and the steam has to go somewhere, you just cannot turn those huge boilers off by flicking a switch.
One of the most effective ways of reducing speed is by rudder cycling where putting the rudder hard over each way continuously you reduce speed rapidly but maintain an approximate heading over the ground.
rgds
JA

cappy
31st December 2016, 12:27 PM
as a matter of interest would a large tanker at say 10 knots and a small coaster at 10 knots in the same calm sea ...both stop in a similar distance once stop engines was called for.......ps i am thinking of a ton of steel and a ton of feather situation.....cappy

Captain Kong
31st December 2016, 01:02 PM
Hi John
In that particular emergency stop, no engine movements are made, the engine was still running full ahead, but because it turns beam on to the sea the underwater "sail" area would stop the vessel in the six cables distance, then before it starts to move on the new course, just stop engine. so no astern movements are required. The engines were Steam Turbine
BUT one should not be in that position anyway to have to do an emergency stop.
When altering course at the charted position we always altered course six cables before it and the ship would slide down to the charted position and then carry on, on the charted course line.
I guess if just slowing down on the engine movements then the ship would carry on for a few miles.
Cheers
Brian.

Ivan Cloherty
31st December 2016, 01:09 PM
as a matter of interest would a large tanker at say 10 knots and a small coaster at 10 knots in the same calm sea ...both stop in a similar distance once stop engines was called for.......ps i am thinking of a ton of steel and a ton of feather situation.....cappy

No cappy kinetic energy would drive each forward in relation to its displacement, so the larger vessel would cover more distance in coming to a full stop

John Arton
31st December 2016, 01:18 PM
Brian
Going off thread a bit. Did you ever do any of those ship simulator courses at Southampton in the 70/80's. They used to have you spending ages drawing up the passage plans on the charts marking wheel over points etc. etc. Took ages to do and by the time you had done the passage briefing you were lucky to get 1 hour on the actual simulator to carry out the exercise.
I did a couple there all with experienced Masters and Mates and we all knew that on joining a ship one of the first tasks as watch keeper was to familiarise yourself with the vessel manoeuvring characteristics such as the advance for any given turn etc. This was ingrained in your head so when taking any action you always knew how far ahead or what heading you would be on given initial speed and rudder applied yet those lecturers wanted notes all over the chart almost obliterating the charts important printed info.
rgds
JA

Captain Kong
31st December 2016, 01:23 PM
Hi John,
yes I did a couple of courses at Warsash College on those simulators,
around 1979 and again in 1982
Cheers
Brian

Ivan Cloherty
1st January 2017, 09:46 AM
Did a few stints on a stimulator in Valparaiso, does that count?

j.sabourn
1st January 2017, 10:38 AM
Was that thrown in with the wax Treatment Ivan.

Ivan Cloherty
1st January 2017, 10:51 AM
Was that thrown in with the wax Treatment Ivan.

Knew there was something strange with you new Aussies, please do tell about the wax

j.sabourn
1st January 2017, 11:41 AM
Well now Ivan Cappy swore by the wax treatment in Japan who were proper professionals at it, so without wanting people to be embarrassed about will try and explain. After you received the stimulation course which you are so proud about. Could be one of the girls or even the Mama San herself, or even one of the half and halfs, would grab a personal part of you and with the palm of one hand, and with the palm of the other hand give a short sharp strike to the end of. And Bravo the wax would jump out of your ears. When ever I go to the Doctors these days for an ear syringe I keep my eyes open to see if any of the nurses are approachable for this delicate operation. Cheers JS

Richard Quartermaine
1st January 2017, 12:41 PM
That's the silver service John. Two boards and the Nutcracker Suite was a ballet sight more excruciating.
Richard