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Doc Vernon
8th June 2016, 11:51 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FKRVkdXxVaU

Oh boy this reminds me so much of a Trip through that notorious Bay at times .it was on the Stirling Castle 1958 and we hit really rough Seas inn the Bay.it was for me a new experience and although a bit wary of this new experience it was really so exciting too,and I never really had a thought of real danger,although it I suppose was there and could have been far worse!
But then I suppose there are many here who have been through both this Bay in bad Weather and far worse in other Areas of the Seas and Oceans of this World!

Of course also in this Video it is of a much Larger Liner,so in fact the old Winchester without Stabilizers would have been far worse,and lower in the Water too.

But its one trip that will always stay with me!
Funny thing in life there is always something that happens that you will never forget!

PS If you just let the Video keep running it brings up more good ones as well!
Cheers

Cheers

j.sabourn
9th June 2016, 12:14 AM
Apart from weather Vernon the Bay brings back other memories of what was considered the height of modern and scientific navigational equipment right up well into the eighties, and that was the Decca navigator for those who don't know it consisted of three clocks which gave a reading of Red Green and Purple. One had special Decca charts with these coloured lines on and one applied whatever correction to, and where the lines bisected each other, gave you a position. This coverage was for UK waters and extended approx. to about the halfway mark in the Bay. So after that was back to the trusty old sextant, assuming no one had dropped it during the period not in use. The Bay has received the acclaim of bad weather as other parts of the world, but have made many passages across when it was near enough flat calm. Cheers JWS

Doc Vernon
9th June 2016, 12:23 AM
Thank you JS very interesting
Yes indeed I too saw other Trips through the Bay when calm as ever,recall once that it was like a sheet of Glass not a ripple ,strange Mother nature.
What was the name of that called when the Sea is so flat and no movement!
I just cannot remember now!
We had a Thread on it (think it was mine too ??)
Cheers

j.sabourn
9th June 2016, 12:37 AM
Flat as a Mill pond??? When doing weather reports and remarking on height of sea was done in numbers zero was flat calm. It is nearly always a bone of contention among people doing such reports as to whether it is the height of the sea or the height of the swell when you see weather people on TV given out such info for small boats. It would be better in most cases if they reported the total height together, so if you had a 4 metre swell and a 6 metre sea running on top of it to report it as a total sea and swell height of 10 metres. A seaman would know what they mean when reporting each height separately but the general public don't. The same as Joe Bloggs ashore repeats the announcers report of a front coming in, they should realize this is a forecast for rain and an increase in wind velocity. A painted ship upon a painted ocean, those were the days. It was not unusual for the sea and swell to run in different directions also. Cheers JWS

Doc Vernon
9th June 2016, 12:46 AM
Just came to me JS
Doldrums at Sea! Calm as a sheet of Glass!
Cheers


Found the initial post on it!
http://www.merchant-navy.net/forum/merchant-navy-general-postings/7401-doldrums.html?highlight=Doldrums

j.sabourn
9th June 2016, 12:54 AM
The Doldrums are an area in equatorial latitudes of light variable winds. It was an area where the old sailing ship masters were quite happy to be clear of, and are records of them towing their ships with the ships boats in an endeavour to clear the area. Anyone for overtime ?? Cheers JWS

Doc Vernon
9th June 2016, 01:03 AM
Yep at least knew that JS
Cheers

Des Taff Jenkins
9th June 2016, 01:08 AM
Hi Vernon.
Good video, there would have been more green ones coming over the bow on some of the Little ones I was on. I think the Bay held trepidation as it would have been the first day at sea for passengers leaving Southampton at night. I'd say the on the many trips I did through there it would have been fifty fifty as to calm or storm. Would love to have been on that ship in that though, I used to get a thrill in a good storm sometimes, especially acting like a submarine on a fully loaded tanker.
Cheers Des

Richard Quartermaine
9th June 2016, 02:07 AM
In October 1947 I was leaning on rail of the old coal fired Raranga as we were crossing The Bay at 8 knots en route to London on a moonlit night. A semi submerged submarine went by in the opposite direction probably about 30 yards away. It wasn't until the next morning that I heard all the fuss about it.

Crossing The Bay from S'hampton in September 1951 outward bound on the Ex Monarch of Bermuda, the immigrant ship New Australia, it was as nasty as I had seen it. Up in the main entry area there were a bunch of larrikins from the Belfast Pool with buckets and mops skidding around and as a poor intending New Aussie cried out "EUROPE" there would be a hail of cheers.

The coal fire Morinda out of Sydney for Lord Howe and Norfolk Islands, New Hebrides and Solomon Islands was a great thrill when we got in high seas and had the title of the only coal buirning submarine operating out of Sydney.
Richard

happy daze john in oz
9th June 2016, 06:20 AM
Bay of Biscay, Great Australian Bight two of the roiughest waters I have ever sailed in.

Interesting to not the ship in this video is one of the modern cruise ships, appears to hold up well considering the air depth of her and the overall shape.

Dennis McGuckin
9th June 2016, 04:11 PM
Had some rough seas in the Bay, but some of the worst weather I experienced was in the Medi.
Found that somewhat surprising.
Guess every sea in the world can have it's day.

Doc Vernon
9th June 2016, 07:21 PM
Not the same I know as the Bay and other parts but this also brings to mind the Cape Rollers at times can be very daunting ,have also had some ding dongers through them when entering and leaving Cape Town!
Cheers

John Albert Evans
9th June 2016, 07:25 PM
The Pentland Firth Took some beating when it was rough.

John Albert Evans.

vic mcclymont
9th June 2016, 07:48 PM
Reminds of my first trip through the Bay.
I found the channel between the Canary Islands worse than the Bay, also the mouth of the channel.
Regards
Vic

Doc Vernon
9th June 2016, 07:52 PM
The Pentland Firth Took some beating when it was rough.

John Albert Evans.


Sure she would have JAE not a very large one was she!
Cheers
PENTLAND FIRTH - IMO 5274278 - ShipSpotting.com - Ship Photos and Ship Tracker (http://www.shipspotting.com/gallery/photo.php?lid=1765674)

Ivan Cloherty
9th June 2016, 10:15 PM
Sure she would have JAE not a very large one was she!
Cheers
PENTLAND FIRTH - IMO 5274278 - ShipSpotting.com - Ship Photos and Ship Tracker (http://www.shipspotting.com/gallery/photo.php?lid=1765674)

I think he meant the passage at the North of Scotland and not the ship Doc, that passage could be a real bummer in a full gale and rip tides of 6/7 knots and wind onshore

Doc Vernon
9th June 2016, 10:21 PM
Oh! I must have read it incorrectly Ivan
Thanks however that Ship is small to go through any real tough weather!
Cheers

Chris Allman
9th June 2016, 10:37 PM
Cant remember the number of times I sailed through the Bay of Biscay - twice every trip on the South America runs. Heaved to for two and a half days on one trip in December - just butting into it with just enough steerage way. No hot food, cook dare not light galley stove. Sandwiches and tea or coffee from a electric kettle on gimbals. At one stage main engine stopped because we rolled over so far, oil in side bunkers fell away from main feed pipe and starved the engine of fuel. Bit of a buttock clenching few minutes but all praise to the engineers who got us going again and back relentlessly butting into it. Very glad to get to Liverpool that trip.

Peter F Chard
10th June 2016, 03:47 AM
#1 Nine days Antwerp to Gibraltar and this was on the " Somali " -- Twin six cylinder Doxford opposed piston engines, 14000 HP. We even lost ground one day and were pushed backwards by 50 or so NM. Regards Peter in NZ.

Doc Vernon
10th June 2016, 05:15 AM
Just going back to the Bay and the Cape Rollers something that I could never understand and it really annoyed me was the fact that when in those Rough Waters many of the Bloods were really Sea Sick ,but would insist on coming down to the Dining Saloon and stuff themselfes,only to get up really fast and make their way to the nearest Toilet or Deck where they then just threw the entire lot up again!

Just because they had paid for their passages,they had to get everything out of it,but fell short I can tell you! LOL

What a sight for sore Eyes at times,and besides me being annoyed,i had to have a giggle over it.
Silly Beggars.

Gulliver
10th June 2016, 06:05 AM
I only recall being seasick once in twenty years,and strangely enough that was in Biscay bound from Le Havre to Cape Town on my very first trip. Since then,despite sometimes being in some rough weather and sailing on some ships with not very comfortable seaway characteristics nothing.
I think that although it can certainly be to do with your sense of motion and balance,in many cases it is psychological.
That first time,for me,it was a building feeling of expectation of traversing Biscay in deteriorating weather.I don't think it was particularly bad,perhaps a westerly Force 6 or 7 and a moderate swell,but it was my first trip to sea,and in wide-eyed wonderment you automatically can't take your eyes off the sea ("don't look at it ! "you're told,but you can't really not do it can you,it's bloody everywhere,the ship ploughing into the rollers and chucking up spray as high as the mast,while learning to keep your balance by anticipating each roll ,in a Bollocky Bill the Sailor fashion...

So psychological then I feel regarding Biscay. It's no worse than the sea and weather in many locations.

Once I was trying to impress a new girlfriend with my Bollocky Bill escapades.I only had to mention the dreaded word 'Biscay' once ,whilst building myself up to a monumental tale of 100 foot waves,the ship rolling over twice,the cook going overboard then being flung back onto deck 20 minutes later,etc.etc.- .As I say she only had to hear the word Biscay before she suddenly turned green and made a dash for the Ladies.
Mind you that might have been the chicken biriyani we'd scoffed earlier and the half dozen vodka and cokes she'd since tipped down her throstle...
I wasn't lucky that night,and I heard a few years later she'd gone on to marry a chartered accountant.
Now, I wonder what exciting tales he told her.....
20603
Gulliver

happy daze john in oz
10th June 2016, 06:16 AM
Yes Vernon I have seen thta as well on the run to Cape Town. But one guy get it very wrong stuffed like an oversized pig he rushed up on deck in the bay to bring up the days takings. Obviously not aware of wind conditions and did not go to leeward. Up it came and all back in his face.

But yes those Cape rollers were very odd, never looked that big but they did move the ship about.

Ivan Cloherty
10th June 2016, 07:18 AM
Oh! I must have read it incorrectly Ivan
Thanks however that Ship is small to go through any real tough weather!
Cheers

Was on one smaller (Dominence) in a force 9/10, surprising what punishment they can take, but nerve wracking all the same, one trip was enough with a lunatic skipper

john sutton
10th June 2016, 08:02 AM
during 7 years at sea I must havecrossed the bay at least a dozen times.Cant say that I experienced particularly bad weather probably beacause aaaaaaai was seasick every outbound trip at the slightest rough weather.
However some years ago I crewed for my pal on his 42ft sailing boat down to spain.We had on board a pro delivery skipper who set a course way out from the bay and the only rough weather was send us atlantic rollers nt the broken seas normally associated with the bay.
Couple of years later I took my 35ft trawler yatch to spain and followed his previous advice with very little weather problems.
I suppose if your a commercial skipper you need to take the shortest course to save time and fuel but if one is playing these things are not important

Gulliver
10th June 2016, 08:23 AM
Was on one smaller (Dominence) in a force 9/10, surprising what punishment they can take, but nerve wracking all the same, one trip was enough with a lunatic skipper

Only been on one rock-dodger,Ivan,the 1961 built Cornishbrook (1,599 grt), but not in any bad weather.
However,as we all do,I used to see many coasters ,especially in the well-used shipping routes like through Biscay and the South China Sea. I say 'see' because in rough weather quite often you couldn't! You would usually see them on radar and of course manually plot them on your screen-how quaint and old-fashioned that sounds in today's high-tech ECDIS world. Then you (and your lookout if you had one) would spend ages straining your eyes through binocs trying to sight her. Then later you'd probably see what looked like a huge spume of foam passing down your side and the little coaster steadily pounding into the seas,up in the air one minute,then lost to view as she slid down into a trough,looking for all the world like a submarine.
I admire those guys for choosing to put up with being flung about for days on end,being constantly damp and not getting enough sleep,hoping that should the unthinkable happen that only a tiny inflatable liferaft is your only salvation- and probably not being paid as much as we deepsea guys!
Forgive them Lord for they know not what they do,or perhaps it's horses for courses !

Now your mention of lunatic skippers is another story!


20604
PS Cornishbrook was sold two years later,in 76 after my trip on her and renamed BESSY G.(Cyprus).She was wrecked 37.20N/9.40E 12.7.78 & burnt out 19.7.78 [Antwerp-Tripoli, Lebanon, sugar]





Gulliver

Ivan Cloherty
10th June 2016, 08:43 AM
Had a couple of years on the coast, probably more if I tot it up, it was a different way of life and you took some punishment personally in rough weather and it is surprising what punishment those little ships could take, a great learning curve for navigation and ship handling. Did you know that the 'Cornishbrook' went across North Atlantic to Canada on a couple of occasions. When were you on her

John Albert Evans
10th June 2016, 09:02 AM
Sure she would have JAE not a very large one was she!
Cheers
PENTLAND FIRTH - IMO 5274278 - ShipSpotting.com - Ship Photos and Ship Tracker (http://www.shipspotting.com/gallery/photo.php?lid=1765674)

Not That Pentland Firth Vernon
This Pentland Firth.206052060620607

John.

Gulliver
10th June 2016, 09:02 AM
Had a couple of years on the coast, probably more if I tot it up, it was a different way of life and you took some punishment personally in rough weather and it is surprising what punishment those little ships could take, a great learning curve for navigation and ship handling. Did you know that the 'Cornishbrook' went across North Atlantic to Canada on a couple of occasions. When were you on her

Yes I remember she did cross the Atlantic. I was on her 74 waiting to go up for 2nd mates FG . Joined Belfast,then Newlyn,Deptford Creek,Tilbury,Leith,Rotterdam,Birkenhead,paid off.Only remember the name of the Master,Bill Crisp from Hull,nice old man,ex N.Sea Ferries.

Ivan Cloherty
10th June 2016, 09:21 AM
Not That Pentland Firth Vernon
This Pentland Firth.206052060620607

John.

Those are the passages I remember John, don't recall ever having a smooth one, that's the weather RN ships expected slow, heavily laden MN vessels to keep station in during convoys in WWII

Richard Quartermaine
10th June 2016, 11:42 AM
#16: Christmas 1975 had been sent by Turriff Taylor where I was working as a payroll clerk on the Flotta / Grangemouth Pipeline build office at Coupar Angus to help pay off the Flotta terminal crew for the holidays. I had to get back to Kinclaven, Perthshire for Christmas or face matrimonial hell.

All flights to Aberdeen were full so luckily got the vessel Ragnald, I think it was, from Kirkwall and the sea was like a millpond with a bright moon shining and I sat on deck with a Mckewans (or two) much of the way to Aberdeen.
Richard

Ivan Cloherty
10th June 2016, 03:18 PM
Not That Pentland Firth Vernon
This Pentland Firth.206052060620607

John.

Why did we do it?

John Albert Evans
10th June 2016, 03:20 PM
Ivan, we never though anything about it, we just accepted it.

John

Captain Kong
10th June 2016, 03:33 PM
It rocked us to sleep that is why.
Brian

Dennis McGuckin
10th June 2016, 04:38 PM
Cant remember the number of times I sailed through the Bay of Biscay - . Very glad to get to Liverpool that trip.
Hi Cris, Same sort of trip on the Sarah Bowater.
Fun times!

Gulliver
10th June 2016, 08:19 PM
It rocked us to sleep that is why.BrianYes just wedge yourself in ,(a lifejacket was good for that-also pretty useful if you heard the abandon ship alarm ) and, forget about counting sheep ,but try to count the number of screws rolling about in the false deckhead above your bunk,thoughtfully and deliberately left in there-it was a tradition apparently-by the shipbuilders carpenters and fitting out team The barskets!

vic mcclymont
10th June 2016, 08:37 PM
Remember arriving Cape Town told anchor off until a berth became available. There was a heavy swell, we rolled nd rolled. Our sister ship Clan Ross, arrived anchored off, it was like watching a set of windscreen wipers, the pair of us rolled left, right, left right. We were the only two that really rolled, we were both light ship.
regards
Vic

Ivan Cloherty
10th June 2016, 10:00 PM
Remember arriving Cape Town regards
Vic

eeh Vic tha's gone all American, don't you mean port/stb'd port/stb'd

Des Taff Jenkins
11th June 2016, 01:27 AM
Not That Pentland Firth Vernon
This Pentland Firth.206052060620607

John.
HI John.
I wonder how much today's teenagers would pay for a trip like that, better then the fairground rides.
Cheers des

Des Taff Jenkins
11th June 2016, 01:37 AM
HI Vernon.
Those Cape rollers are the longest swells on earth started in the Antarctic and went up to the Arctic, some would hit South Africa, but most with no land to stop them would go right up through the South and North Atlantic, as you say you couldn't really see them they were so wide. On one trip I was on the buoy off Sable Island registered waves of one hundred feet. If those people on the Northern beaches only realized that what hit them were baby's compared to the Cape rollers.
Cheers Des

Richard Quartermaine
11th June 2016, 04:43 AM
The Pentland Firth Took some beating when it was rough.

John Albert Evans.

So did Fair Isle John and that beautiful knitwear was from some of the best sheep for the purpose.
Richard

happy daze john in oz
11th June 2016, 05:13 AM
Crossing the Greta Australian Bight on a10,000 ton cargo ship, fine until about a third across then it hit. For three days we thought we were in a submarine. Cold food only and no one allowed on deck. A good many ships have gone down in that part of the world and little wonder when you see some of the waves.

Richard Quartermaine
11th June 2016, 05:16 AM
When the Gothic was at anchor at Cape Town in January 1962 en route to Mombasa Royal Navy complement were organising the lowering of the Royal Barges that were on the after hatch. CMDR McC was overseeing the raising of the barge and obviously misread the cape rollers albeit they weren't significant. Up on the derricks was a barge swinging in gay abandon with yells of what were mostly useless direction. I was watching this as Commodore AV Richardson appeared at the rail overlooking the scene, shouted some commands, the swinging stopped and the barge plonked neatly on the chocks. He tuned around, and strode off. We weighed anchor and proceeded to the dock.

Richard Quartermaine
11th June 2016, 10:54 AM
OOPS! 1952, not 1962.
Richard

vic mcclymont
11th June 2016, 06:18 PM
Nookie Nichols, the C.E. when I joined the Clan Ranald , regaled us with tale when she was dispatched to Canada by the South African Fruit Board with only 500 tons of fruit onboard. It was an experiment to see if South African Fruit could penetrate the North American market.
The Ranald crossed the Atlantic in the worst storm ever, it was the time the liner (can't remember her name) made her maiden Atlantic voyage and ended up with a stoved in bridge.
The Ranald rolled at alarming degrees, she rolled so much that she lost sea water suction and the main engine and generators shutdown. The fire pump was rigged to provide cooling water to the generators, life lines were rigged in the E.R,. to allow engineers to move about.
He also stated that the accommodation front welds had parted at the main deck, sure enough a fillet had been welded across the whole accommodation front at main deck level.
The experiment was never repeated.
Regards
Vic

John Blaney
11th June 2016, 08:42 PM
As already posted, in severe weather I always had confidence in the way the ship was being handled,
officers never seemed to take any credit, that's class, man.

Gulliver
11th June 2016, 09:27 PM
.
The Ranald crossed the Atlantic in the worst storm ever, it was the time the liner (can't remember her name) made her maiden Atlantic voyage and ended up with a stoved in bridge.



Was that the Italian liner Michaelangelo? :-In April 1966 Michelangelo, under command of Senior Captain Giuseppe Soletti, was hit by an unusually large wave during a storm in the mid-Atlantic, which caused the forward part of her superstructure to collapse, or to be pushed backwards, and swept two passengers into the sea. One crew member died a few hours later and over 50 people were injured. When repairs were carried out after the accident, the aluminum plating in the superstructure was replaced by steel plates. Similar reconstruction was carried out on the Raffaello and other contemporary ships such as the ss United States and ss France.
20631

That's what worries me about today's liners.Whereas the oldies mentioned above were strengthened or later modified to cope with probable bad weather or rogue waves the latest floating villages seem flimsily built What would not be enough imminent bad weather to make the old liners deviate from their course would now have them deviating hundreds of miles to avoid it.

Des Taff Jenkins
13th June 2016, 12:30 AM
OOPS! 1952, not 1962.
Richard
Hi Richard.
I was about to correct you as I was on the RFA Wave Baron which accompanied the Gothic in 52 as far as Colombo.
Cheers Des

happy daze john in oz
13th June 2016, 06:57 AM
Was that the Italian liner Michaelangelo? :-In April 1966 Michelangelo, under command of Senior Captain Giuseppe Soletti, was hit by an unusually large wave during a storm in the mid-Atlantic, which caused the forward part of her superstructure to collapse, or to be pushed backwards, and swept two passengers into the sea.That's what worries me about today's liners.Whereas the oldies mentioned above were strengthened or later modified to cope with probable bad weather or rogue waves the latest floating villages seem flimsily built What would not be enough imminent bad weather to make the old liners deviate from their course would now have them deviating hundreds of miles to avoid it.


Gulliver, many of the new breed do not go to regions of severe weather, but from what I have experienced with some I think they will most likely be OK.

Richard Quartermaine
13th June 2016, 12:01 PM
Des. We did not proceed to Colombo as scheduled when the tour was cancelled on the Kings death and we continued direct to Oz because of cargo commitments. You must have been with the tour that followed in 1953.
I have written about the Gothic but I can't work out how to send PDF documents to PMs on this site. but if you would like to read my story 'A Journey Through Life' send me a PM with your email address and I will attach to a reply.
I saw my GP and Cardiologist of more than two decades for a stress test last week and presented them with a DVD of what I had done so far and thanking them for their many years of keeping my turbines running smoothly. At the same time saying to keep up the good work as I have more to add.
Cheers, Richard

Des Taff Jenkins
14th June 2016, 01:10 AM
Hi Richard.
It was in 52, but now I remember we sailed for Colombo and the Gothic was still in Aden bunkering. We went to Chittagong, Rangoon then Singapore, then back to oil the fleet. Will send private mail.
cheers Des

Des Taff Jenkins
14th June 2016, 01:23 AM
Hi Richard.
Sent you private mail, odd I couldn't find Quartermaine in the drop down list so sent it to plain Richard which I hope is you as it headed the list, if not will get a curious e-mail from some one else.
Cheers Des

Doc Vernon
14th June 2016, 02:25 AM
This is Richard's details Des!
http://www.merchant-navy.net/forum/members/5939.html

happy daze john in oz
14th June 2016, 05:55 AM
A region that was at one time in the news almost daily has it would appear disappeared or lost its threat. The Burmuda Triangle was all the go back in the 80's, where is it now?

Richard Quartermaine
14th June 2016, 06:44 AM
Hi Richard.
Sent you private mail, odd I couldn't find Quartermaine in the drop down list so sent it to plain Richard which I hope is you as it headed the list, if not will get a curious e-mail from some one else.
Cheers Des
Des,
Just click on this for contact webmaster (http://www.qioldies.org/webmaster.html) . this can also be found on my 'Home Page'.
Cheers, Richard

Ivan Cloherty
14th June 2016, 07:26 AM
A region that was at one time in the news almost daily has it would appear disappeared or lost its threat. The Burmuda Triangle was all the go back in the 80's, where is it now?

It's gone the way of the Dodo bird, except its whirlpool went round in ever decreasing circles and it disappeared up its own orifice

j.sabourn
14th June 2016, 07:38 AM
#53... John it was an equilateral triangle the same as used in Pool or snooker for holding their balls in,( the Synthetic ones ) and some enterprising individual saw the use of and is now on his snooker table in his games room. Cheers JWS

Colin Wood
26th June 2016, 07:43 AM
Sounds like the same storm I encountered as 3rd. mate on the Scottish Prince. Every ship we could see , from Liners to fishing vessels were hove to, when Oporto Radio sent out the weather as 'Gentle Zephers'. The shouts of disgust were louder that the wind. Shortly after, an amendment to the weather came through saying gale force winds were imminent.

John Arton
26th June 2016, 08:31 AM
One of the worst storms I was in was when I was on 5000 ton chemical tankers running around the U.K. and N. Europe. Coming down from Norway one trip got hammered by a hurricane when we were off the Texel, rolling 30 degrees each side even though we were hove too.
Another area where you could encounter huge seas was at the entrance to the Bristol Channel and at one time in the sailing directions and on the charts of the area there used to be a warning notice regarding the possibility of dangerous seas in the area. My pal on his 5000 ton chemical tanker had the flying bridge wrecked by a sea coming on-board when he was north bound for the Mersey. He wrote to the Admiralty regarding the removal of the warning from the sailing directions and charts, requesting that they re-instated it. Don't think they did though. The abnormal seas would be caused by the seas generated by an Atlantic storm encountering the out-going tidal waters in the Bristol Channel.
rgds
JA

Brian Charles Williams
13th October 2016, 09:46 AM
When crossing the North Atlantic light ship we were being battered so much heading West for Newport News that we were taking in water through the prop shaft so the baskets were run up and eventually we ended up in Bermuda for repairs. The longest crossing I had ever experienced going across the pond.
A scary experience but also quite exciting for a young bloke. I was never sea sick before that trip & wasn`t then, just thinking `just hang on & hang on to the life lines when going forard or aft .Now for the `silly bit`......... was as sick as a dog entering Durban with the slightest of swells !!

Captain Kong
13th October 2016, 10:29 AM
The Western Ocean in Winter was always Bad,
Here is the Empress of France doing somersaults in December 1956. I climbed the foremast, up the old rigging like a sailing ship, with my old 1930s Kodak Box Camera, had to use two hands to take a photo with those. The accommodation was flooded, Ports all smashed and sea pouring in. No sleep for a week.
Brian

Ivan Cloherty
13th October 2016, 10:39 AM
.Now for the `silly bit`......... was as sick as a dog entering Durban with the slightest of swells !!

Never sea sick myself, but when I was on Deep Water trawlers we'd get some pretty horrendous weather around Bear Island and North Coast of Iceland and the lads were never sick, even from the smell of the boiling cod liver boiler house (a yuk smell) but on getting back into the Humber into smooth waters some would be making for the bulwarks, but god help you if you made a comment or grinned.

Trawler mens' cure for seasickness (worked for me) get the young lad stupid enough (me) to say he feels sick then you are immediately whipped up to the foc'le head, tied to the rails facing for'd so that you can see the waves rolling towards you, believe me as a young teenager (13) you are too scared ever to even think about being sick, they leave you there for two plus hours, release you, wrap you in a blanket, sit in the galley for 30 minutes or so to thaw out and then you're back to work, seemed cruel at the time but there are no passengers on a deep water trawler, my first trip MN at aged 16 we experienced a hurricane, my previous experience stood me well.....................happy days!!!

Brian Charles Williams
13th October 2016, 10:59 AM
Wow......I could hardly climb into my bunk & stay there never mind `climb the rigging !` Brian W

Louis the Amigo
13th October 2016, 01:59 PM
Hi shipmates,the Irish sea? a bit ruff in winter, on a small ship 500 tons tanker, no work on the deck No over time? damm. flying bridge not good? some safety lines are in order to get some paint from forecastle head paint locker. I need my over time.takes me back a few years? I paint the bulk heads bosun?

Terry Sullivan
3rd April 2019, 08:00 AM
I too was lucky regarding the weather in the Bay, although some passeners got a bit excited. I have experienced other bad weather areas but the worst was strangely in the Mediterrranean. My father was always asking me if I had had rough weather in the Med and I always metioned mill ponds. Then one evening we sailed out of Genoa and the sea was like a mirror. Awoken about 1.00 am by the radiator coming off the bulkhead in the POs mess, missing lifeboat, stores scattered and the crew didn't bother to come up for breakfast. It was a night to remember and at last I knew why my father kept asking about storms in the Meddy. Terry Sullivan R340406

Red Lead Ted
3rd April 2019, 11:01 AM
The Doldrums are an area in equatorial latitudes of light variable winds. It was an area where the old sailing ship masters were quite happy to be clear of, and are records of them towing their ships with the ships boats in an endeavour to clear the area. Anyone for overtime ?? Cheers JWS

You could always try and whistle up a wind John. :whoopdedoo: As for the Bay o Biscay, small Everade boat 1975 going up the Medi, Not only a Force 12 to contend with...……………… A skipper reciting prayers to all 9 crew members on the bridge dressed in overboard gear and pitch black...…………...:cripes:

Harry Nicholson
3rd April 2019, 02:16 PM
Dad saw me off on my first trip (1956) with a caution at West Hartlepool station, he warned me of the Bay of Biscay and recalled his own sea voyage to Salonika on a troopship (1917). The horses vomited through the Biscay crossing and he had to clean up the mess. He urged me: 'Never be a volunteer; never play cards on railway trains, there might be cardsharps aboard; never go with women who want your money.' (Since then I've never played cards on railway trains, but I have volunteered now and again)

happy daze john in oz
4th April 2019, 05:14 AM
Back in 2015 we took a cruise from Southampton to the Medi.

The chanell was a bit rough but not enough to notice, but then we hit the bay.
I at on my balcony soaking it all up, waves of about three meters or so, nothing to write home about.
Brought back some wonderful memories of times long past.
But apparently the sick bay was full of passengers with severe sea sickness.

Some I was told even had to have injections to help them with it.
But of course as we know medical practitioners at sea charge like wounded bulls so some would have had a bit of a shock when they got their account.