PDA

View Full Version : Sulpher



gray_marian
7th March 2015, 04:12 PM
Was reading recently about sulphur candles in 1930 cinemas being lit on a Friday evening then snuffed out the following morning in time for Saturday matinee. What was used on ships in your era?

Frederick Lacey
7th March 2015, 05:00 PM
Electric Light Bulbs. DC current. on board.

Where I was born gas lights with mantles, moved in 1935 then had electric light

F

Ivan Cloherty
7th March 2015, 05:27 PM
Electric light operated by DC current, but also sailed on coasting vessels where in port generators were shut down and we relied on paraffin lamps. This latter not new to me as I never lived with electric light until I was 12 years old just before I my first trip sea at 13 years old on a deep water trawler. Also never had water taps or toilets in the house until I was 12, mum had of course experience these things before we were bombed out three times so it must have been particularily hard for her.

gray_marian
7th March 2015, 05:27 PM
Thank you Fred, Sorry I meant what was used in the internal area's on ships to
annihilate the fleas.

Ivan Cloherty
7th March 2015, 05:29 PM
Thank you Fred, Sorry I meant what was used in the internal area's on ships to
annihilate the fleas.

What fleas?

gray_marian
7th March 2015, 06:01 PM
#5, I assumed [wrongly?] that ships would need to be fumigated periodically, what with carrying grain etc, hence rats, fleas and also the using of straw mattresses for crew?

Frederick Lacey
7th March 2015, 06:25 PM
Fleas no, bed bugs, maybe, cockroaches sure thing. ..F.

Marian, are you saying your cinema had fleas?? all the old cinemas were called Flea Pits in those days. ....F.

cappy
7th March 2015, 06:42 PM
##joined a hains boat .......the accomodation doors on all levels were closed as were all ports we were put in a seamans mission i think it was birkenhead .......stayed ashore 24 hours .....could smell strong smell when came back aboard ........down of the azores a while later cockies wre running wild .....we painted all the galley in a thing called silvereen they didnt like it ....but nothing ever kills them the eggs hatch in warm weather and it just goes on.....little barstewards.......cappy an ace with a flitgun......

- - - Updated - - -

in shields we had a fleapit called the impy you could get in for 4 jamjars or three lemonade bottles

gray_marian
7th March 2015, 11:04 PM
#7, Thank you Fred but no I was referring to an 1930 cinema that had a member of staff light the sulphur candles on a Friday evening #1. However a few months ago was in the Cameo Picture house in Edinburgh when a mouse rang across my daughter's foot...scream!! I nearly spilt my wine;)

Ivan Cloherty
7th March 2015, 11:17 PM
From my personal experience ships were never fumigated on a regular basis as a matter of course, a lot depended upon what cargo you were loading and what was the previous cargo carried or port visited prior to loading current cargo. Only in severe cases of infestation were vessels shut down completely and crew billeted ashore, otherwise it was sulphur (or other pesticides) bombs thrown down the holds, all vents covered etc . Never knew of cases of fleas was declared safe, aboard, it was always cockroaches, weevils, rats etc, we were always advised when cleaning the holds after the bombing never ever step on a dead cockroach as it will discharge hundreds of live eggs which will evade your best sweeping efforts and they even survived a hold washdown with powerful hoses, apparently they are the oldest surviving species, apparently alligators are the second, but thankfully never had to sweep those up!

j.sabourn
8th March 2015, 12:34 AM
Marian, every British ship had amongst the paperwork what was called the De_Ratification Certificate which showed the ship was supposed to have been inspected every 6 months for vermin. Howevever saying that was probably another of these paper laws not always adhered to. As regards other lifestock on board, cappy used to class as fresh meat and eat it. Ships in my time always used to carry emergency oil lamps of every type i.e. sidelights, masthead light all the towing and emergency lights, the same as before as was used prior to electricity. The term AC/DC implied that person was of dual sexual traits, believe there is a band now called that, hope they realize what their name means. Cheers JS

gray_marian
8th March 2015, 01:03 AM
Crikey John, You learn something new everyday on here:) From Sulphur Candles, Fleas, Cappy's dietary habits, Rock Groups and folk of different persuasions. Merci

j.sabourn
8th March 2015, 02:03 AM
Cappys law was see it and eat it. You must have seen his post re the jars of something containing livestock, these were put to good use. If they were bought and paid for were always consumable, I was on a Norwegian ship out here and had to carry a doctor due to the amount of people on board. He took it upon himself to go into the fridges and start condemning certain items past their use by date. The Norwegian Master sacked him on the spot and had him replaced by a trained medic. When you come to ships stores you are talking money we can all understand, sometimes you can have stores valued at thousands of pounds, and then again with stores amounting to coppers. On the Hong Kong system once again all stores used to be bought by the ship and paid cash for, if storing on the continent 10,000 pounds for food was not out of the way, this would have a reduction of 10 percent back for cash a thousand pounds, which was very open for dishonesty. Some of the British coasters worked on a similar system which I have also sailed with this was on the two vessels I cant remember the names of, as seem to have a mental blockage when it comes to these 2 vessels which were Yugoslav owned. Cheers JS

j.sabourn
8th March 2015, 02:25 AM
Sulpur... As a cargo carried this from Vancouver to Shanghai in the early 70"s. Is usually a grab discharge and the grab contact in the inside hatch coaming and causing a spark was always igniting the sulpur. Had to have hoses continually pumping water at hand to douse the flames all the time. A pain in the Ass. JS PS When I say flames there is just the immediate flame then smouldering so was easy enough to put out. JS

j.sabourn
8th March 2015, 09:44 AM
De-Ratification Certificate. Ship officially if remember correctly had to be inspected every 6 months for the presence of rats on board unless overrun by vermin this was done by an inspector/s examining mainly the fridge/freezer areas of the ship, they had practical knowledge of the habits of such and knew by their droppings whether there was a lot or not on board. Think it was on their say so whether ship required fumigation. If this certificate was out of date the port health in any port could delay clearance of the ship entering inwards, so was always advisable to keep up to date. The port of entry was desirous of keeping disease away from their communities and not on the welfare of alien seamen to them. When a ship entered Inwards The Arts/Agreement, All light and Harbour dues paid/The clearance from the last port/ Ships Safety Construction Cert. and of course the Cert. of Registry, were deposited at the Custom House or the British Consulate, if had an Agent who did this very good, if not had to do oneself. On clearing outwards these documents were returned to vessel with the necessary Clearance out Cert. light and harbour dues paid, also the current rate of monetary exchange was usually stamped in the back of the Articles and was the one used for calculating how much money everyone had spent on wine women and song. Maybe wrong on the documentation landed ashore but sure someone will know better, as seems that far in the past now is not funny anymore. Pretty sure about the rats though. Cheers JS

John Pruden
8th March 2015, 09:53 AM
coasted a few blue flue ships coming back from the far east cleaning out hatches some creatures down there I don't think even had been named? jp:p

j.sabourn
8th March 2015, 09:56 AM
#16... Didn't find any crocs then John... JS

Richard Quartermaine
8th March 2015, 11:19 AM
I recall the practice for regulating immigration and emigration of rats was metal discs placed half way up the hawsers. Put in modern context the mind boggles!
Richard

Louis the Amigo
8th March 2015, 11:33 AM
Hi shipmates, the only ship I recalled that had Cockroachs was the "PENNYWORTH" but the crew, and rum, made up for them. rat guards? put them on mooring lines many times.

j.sabourn
8th March 2015, 11:36 AM
The old ratguards Richard. Everyone thought they were for keeping the rats from coming on board, it was the other way round and was for stopping them going ashore. If didn't have the approp. rat guards for the wire back springs used to wrap burlap round part of wire and pour tar on same seemed to satisfy the port health. Although any rat with sense would just use the gangway, which used to be painted white at the shore end supposedly to stop rats using, always thought rats were colour blind though. Most used to come onboard through the grain shutes with the grain. Cheers John S

John Arton
8th March 2015, 02:02 PM
I was only ever on one ship that required fumigation, but that was to get rid of the copra beetles from the previous cargo and we were due to load bagged rice. The holds had been washed at least 4 times including once with a so called beetle killer additive to the wash water but all to no avail, the little buggers were still there. It was decided to fumigate the whole ship with, I think, some sort of chlorine gas. This was in Orange, Texas and meant we all had to go and live ashore for 4 days in a hotel whilst the ship was fumigated...oh joy 4 days in a hotel all paid for and loads to drink.
C.P. had a contract with a world wide outfit for checking for infestation and getting rid of any. To get rid of roaches they would place a special powder on the steel beams where the roaches passed along. On going through this powder the roaches would get it on their bodies and ingest it , which led to their dying of the stuff, believe it also made them infertile so they could not breed.
IN order to prevent the spread of disease carried by rodents etc. it is now quite common to place smoke bombs on the top of the grain cargoes prior to sealing the hatches, these smoke bombs are timed to go off after hatches are sealed and they emit a gas that is harmless to humans in open spaces but in enclosed spaces are dangerous as they kill off any rodents etc. There is a recent P and I notice regarding the use of these with SOYA Bean meal and the possibility of scorching the cargo due to the heat these bombs let off.
Rope guards, you will find many ports will fine you if you have incorrectly set rope guards, especially if you have arrived from certain countries and in many countries they will fine you anyway, even if they are correctly set..its called baksheesh.
Re; Light dues
In the U.K. for a 120m, 7500t ship it was 134 per call but after 7 calls within the year, after that it is free.
For that same size ship, Port Dues (including Pilotage) could be anything up to 5000 (Barry) or 2000 (MSC)
Nowadays I doubt if any ships master does his own inward and outward clearance due to the varied and huge amount of papers required.
Most papers are emailed via the agent in nearly every country I have visited these days, even the surrendering of the 1/3 original B/L is usually done by the ships Agent as most vessels Masters, apart from not having the knowledge of the procedures, most likely do not have the time to trot around to the customs house, port authority, receivers etc. including the time to travel the miles between all the various bodies.
rgds
JA

john sutton
8th March 2015, 08:19 PM
here in spain the locals use sulphur to sop dogs pee-ing on gate or door posts.
just sprinkle some around the post every few days.works

Des Taff Jenkins
9th March 2015, 12:49 AM
Hi Marion.
First ship I joined straight from sea school a Hain's boat Trevose, she was in dry dock, she was changing over from a Indian crew, we sailed for Rotterdam and were put ashore while they fumigated her, she was full of cockroaches, going to sea in a day they were all over the place.
As for sulfur there is now a political row going on in Balmain Sydney over the Liners running their engines while in port, as they are using a cheap fuel they spew out sulfur fumes making the local people's kids sick, when they built the new terminal they omitted to put in shore power for the Liners.
Cheers Des

happy daze john in oz
9th March 2015, 05:41 AM
On UCL Lavender ladies there would be no need to fumigate the crew quarters of first class wingers. Most of the perfume they used would kill a brown dog.

j.sabourn
9th March 2015, 09:04 AM
Sulpher...Just add charcoal and saltpetre and whazam you have gunpowder. JS

John Arton
9th March 2015, 10:00 AM
Hi Marion.
First ship I joined straight from sea school a Hain's boat Trevose, she was in dry dock, she was changing over from a Indian crew, we sailed for Rotterdam and were put ashore while they fumigated her, she was full of cockroaches, going to sea in a day they were all over the place.
As for sulfur there is now a political row going on in Balmain Sydney over the Liners running their engines while in port, as they are using a cheap fuel they spew out sulfur fumes making the local people's kids sick, when they built the new terminal they omitted to put in shore power for the Liners.
Cheers Des
Des
IMO introduced new regulations regarding emissions from ships and designated areas established where ships have to burn low sulphur fuel. For instance any ship bound for a European port has to burn fuel containing less than 1% sulphur 24 hours before arriving off Ushant and in special areas that limit is 0.1%. I know the Isle of Wight is a special area and the I.O.W. ferries have to burn gas oil to comply.
I would have thought that Sydney harbour was an area where they were required to burn low sulphur diesel.
California has some of the strictest emissions laws going further than the International regulations, any ship transiting the California coast line has to be a minimum of 200 miles off the coastline before it can use fuel containing more than 1% sulphur.
rgds
JA

j.sabourn
9th March 2015, 11:33 AM
#19 Hey Louis you never said you were on the Pennyworth. Were you there before or after Jim Brady. Wasn't Jim that brought them on board as was clear when I was there. Was that the trip you came back from Bombay and didn't check your bag. If you had the stuttering Ch. Steward there then you probably got them served up in your curry and rice as some kind of oriental nuts. Cheers JS

j.sabourn
9th March 2015, 01:41 PM
Ref. Pennyworth managed sometime ago to get someone to post the picture of, coming down some waterway, don't know if Manchester ship canal or the Kiel Canal. Maybe someone will recognize. JS