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View Full Version : A wee taste of Newfoundland



Jacyn Wade
22nd April 2014, 12:59 AM
Buddy Wasisname And The Other Fellers

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t-45qEOt9EE

Lou Barron
22nd April 2014, 01:16 AM
Very good Jacyn they look like blue cod they were catching the best fish to eat .You know I was going to jump ship in Vancouver love Canada also went to St Johns New Brunswick went to a dance in seaboots it was thick with snow

Jacyn Wade
22nd April 2014, 01:20 AM
Too many mountains near Vancouver for my taste, Lou. I haven't managed to get to Newfoundland yet, but having been through New Brunswick and seen parts of Nova Scotia, I prefer the east coast. Newfoundland is high on my list of places to visit and if I get there, I'll definitely try blue cod. There's nothing in the world like fresh fish.

Keith Tindell
22nd April 2014, 07:18 AM
My very first trip to sea, 57-58 was to Botwood New Foundland, a beautiful place, was very small back then with just a wooden jetty. loaded rolls of paper. Would love to go back and have another look, was in Vancouver a couple of years ago, also a nice city, but was amazed how many druggies, apparently because of the mild winters they all head for Vancouver, KT

cappy
22nd April 2014, 07:56 AM
My very first trip to sea, 57-58 was to Botwood New Foundland, a beautiful place, was very small back then with just a wooden jetty. loaded rolls of paper. Would love to go back and have another look, was in Vancouver a couple of years ago, also a nice city, but was amazed how many druggies, apparently because of the mild winters they all head for Vancouver, KTone really nice place i visited was chermainus in 1957 ....a very small ...then but peacful place me a first tripper and the deck boy went to what was just a sequence of small cabins and a store they told us to watch out for bears .......run cannot describe how fast i ran back through the woods spurred on by any crackle of a twig.......great memories

John Arton
22nd April 2014, 09:47 AM
All the Maritime provinces of Canada are great and it is both myself's and wifeys one regret that we never took the chance to emigrate there when I was offered jobs in B.C. which I thought was one of the best places in the world, especially Vancouver Island. Even thought Prince Rupert was pretty neat. One the other side had great times in both St. John's along with Halifax and other small ports in Nova Scotia. Great scenery and lovely people.
rgds
JA

Ivan Cloherty
22nd April 2014, 10:53 AM
#6 Got to agree with that John, steaming up all the inlets in Victoria/Vancouver islands to pick up lumber at places only reachable by boat or seaplane and thought Vancouver inlet had a special beauty in the 50's/60's not many druggies around then and women had to have a man to go into a bar, and as most old/young seamen dressed up to go ashore in those days were often asked by women to escort them inside and nothing more expected from either side. A gentle relaxed time on the whole

Richard Quartermaine
22nd April 2014, 12:25 PM
On my first trip we were in Halifax, NS in March/April 1947. This was the harbour that witnessed that terrible explosion back in 1918.
In 1953 I went to Toronto for two and a half years on leaving the sea and answering an advert in the Toronto Globe and Mail I started a new career that changed my life with the Head Office of the then Canadian Western assurance Company. Great memories, great friends.
Richard

John Albert Evans
22nd April 2014, 12:59 PM
My wife and I lived in Nova Scotia for 3 years 2001-2004.just outside of Kentville, we had a small properyt with 5 acres of land, it was lovely. One day we had a phone call from an unknow lady in the Immigration Service ordering us to leave Canada as our visa would not be renewed , we had 14 days to leave, we took legal advice but to no avail. They never gave us any reason for that decision, I asked her what would happen if we didnt go and her reply was '"Mr Evans you would be suprized how quick I could get the Mounties around to your property, arrest both you and your wife, handcuff you, put in prison and deported" The legal advice was that they would carry out that threat and it would be better to leave so we did. We did not break any law in that country or anywhere else for that matter. Canada is a beautiful country and we travelled it extensively. My brother in law lives in a place called Manitouwadge Northern Ontario and we have family in Toronto. We were told by our solicitor that they (The Immigration) had probabley 'Red Flagged' us as well, which meant we can no longer enter Canada. We wouldn't even try now. We have put it down to experience but are very dissapointed in the way we were treated by the authorities.

John Albert Evans.

Keith Tindell
22nd April 2014, 01:37 PM
Hi John, how strange, and most of all bleddy annoying if they wont tell you why. My son who is well up in IT applied for Canada a few years ago, his application took nearly 3 years to come through with an acceptance , in the meantime other avenues had opened up, so he turned the offer down. Apparently, if you qualify in a subject in one state, the next state may not accept it. But it is a lovely country, i have an ex shipmate living in Nelson who i met up with after 43 years out of contact. But its too cold there for me KT

Ivan Cloherty
22nd April 2014, 03:17 PM
Perhaps we should swap immigration services, think I'll give Nigel a ring!

John Arton
22nd April 2014, 03:20 PM
Ivan your post#7
In Port Alberni right up to the 70's there was one bar (only about two in the whole place) that still had separate entrances for Men and another for Unescorted Ladies. Thing was when you had passed through the doors you all ended up in the same room. The building was, I'm sure, made of timber and if memory serves me correctly was the Beaumount Hotel. It burnt down some time in the 70's and when I was back there in the early 80's had re-opened as the hotel bar in a motel.
The biggest difference was that it was a topless joint where even the barmaids wore nothing but G-strings...almost put you off your beer.
rgds
JA
p.s. Nanaimo went the same way, all bars turned into topless, pole dancing joints....shame

John Albert Evans
22nd April 2014, 04:29 PM
Yes I agree Keith, our solicitor in NS wrote on our befalf asking for the reasons but never got a reply. Ive been to Nelson, its a very nice place. Theres was pub there called 'The Library'. I stayed at a place called Fruitvale which is not far from Nelson, this was in the 1960s. There is also a place close by called Salmo, its had a golf course which also acted as the local airport (It was classed as a golfport). In those days I used to fly and rented a plane from Castlegar and landed on the golfport and took off from there just for the experience. The fairway acted at the runway and when to wanted to land you had to fly around the course twice and waggle your wings to allow the golfers to move out of your way.It was all good fun.
John.

Keith Tindell
22nd April 2014, 04:37 PM
My old shipmate lives in Ymir, just down the road. We flew back to Vancouver from Castlegar, bit of a hairy take off, slightest fog they dont go, takeoff and gather hight between two mountains i think. I know they looked very close when i looked out of the window.KT

cappy
22nd April 2014, 05:00 PM
Yes I agree Keith, our solicitor in NS wrote on our befalf asking for the reasons but never got a reply. Ive been to Nelson, its a very nice place. Theres was pub there called 'The Library'. I stayed at a place called Fruitvale which is not far from Nelson, this was in the 1960s. There is also a place close by called Salmo, its had a golf course which also acted as the local airport (It was classed as a golfport). In those days I used to fly and rented a plane from Castlegar and landed on the golfport and took off from there just for the experience. The fairway acted at the runway and when to wanted to land you had to fly around the course twice and waggle your wings to allow the golfers to move out of your way.It was all good fun.
John.it never fails to amaze me what merchant seamen get up to........flying a bleedin plane ........good on you .......whenever isee a quote like that i always say to the beloved ......there you are we can do anything given the chance.......would be even more proud if you were a vindi boy ......even if you werent say you were so i can show her ......we were big hitters if we only got the chance...respect to you cappy

John Albert Evans
22nd April 2014, 05:19 PM
Keith

They were close, very close. If I remember correctly there was a wreck of a plane that hit the side of one of those mountains. The pilot pointed it out when we were landing there after flying in from Vancouver.

John

---------- Post added at 06:19 PM ---------- Previous post was at 06:05 PM ----------

Sorry Cappy.

I cannot tell a fib but I am Peanut. And it was only a little plane. :I-Am-Smiling:

John

Lou Barron
23rd April 2014, 12:59 AM
If I remember in St Johns NB if you wanted any booze you had to go to the police station and get a permit .There use to be a young guy come aboard the ship with newspapers and he put us onto a sly grog house and I think the beer was not that costly I think the beer was called White horse or something like that that was in 1946

Des Taff Jenkins
23rd April 2014, 01:29 AM
Hi Jacyn.
Went across to St Johns a few times for timber props, hairy as one time we hit a hurricane and the deck cargo shifted put us on our side. As Lou was saying we had to go to the police station to get a permit for beer, My mate found out that if you put some aspirin in with Coke you got high, I can't remember if it was that or the beer but I know we ended up in the cells for the night. I went to Quebec, Newfoundland, Nova- Scotia had a great time.
Cheers Des

15375

Jacyn Wade
23rd April 2014, 02:15 AM
Great pics, Richard. I'm going to guess that picture of Toronto is the intersection of Yonge Street and St. Clair Avenue, but I could be wrong. Don't know if you remember, but if so, let me know if I'm right. If I'm wrong, I'll get it figured out.

John, sadly, I'm not all that surprised but can't imagine why they would have red flagged you. If you'd been from Jamaica or India or a myriad of other places, no problem. You could even commit a crime and get the royal treatment during a brief stay in one of our jails!! Hubby and I are constantly dumbfounded by the stupid things our government does. Manitouwadge is a fairly remote place, hours from where I live. Not much up there but trees and bears.

---------- Post added at 10:15 PM ---------- Previous post was at 10:10 PM ----------

So, Des, you got caught up in the old aspirin in the Coke trick, eh? Never tried that one myself. Quebec is a great place - better if the politicians didn't try to separate it from the rest of the country, as they do every 15 years or so. They're up to their old tricks again now.

Cheers,
Jacyn

j.sabourn
23rd April 2014, 03:50 AM
#17... Lou, Norway in the 60"s was a bit like that, the state ran the liqour stores and you had to be registered. I think seamen were allowed to get though, not quite sure. Used to be a good place for ships crew to sell liqour to the local populance, as could get treble what you bought it for on the ship. Cheers John S

happy daze john in oz
23rd April 2014, 05:55 AM
Do not know a lot about Canada but on the cruise on the large deck screen they showed some sport from Canada. It would appear they play two lethal games, Ice Hockey, or as it shoul be known how to cut your opponents head of with the stick, and Lacrosse. How to use a sling shot to the best advantage. Enjoyed both.

John Arton
23rd April 2014, 06:28 AM
If I remember in St Johns NB if you wanted any booze you had to go to the police station and get a permit .There use to be a young guy come aboard the ship with newspapers and he put us onto a sly grog house and I think the beer was not that costly I think the beer was called White horse or something like that that was in 1946
Lou
In the winter of 68/69 I was on the Beaverfir running to St. John NB and apart from the Liquor store there were only 3 places where you could buy and drink alcohol and they stopped at 2200. There was the C.P. Hotel, a cocktail lounge at the rear of a restaurant and the Legion club. With having a bar on board we were swamped nightly with female telephonists and nurses, partying every night from 2000 to 0600 with fresh guests appearing at 2400 every night when the shifts in the hospital and telephone exchange changed. We used to have joint parties with Manchester Liners ships, particularly the "Faith" as it too was a definite party ship. My job as cadet was nightly to trot up the road at 130 to get hamburgers for all the officers on board as everyone turned in at 1700 when the dockers knocked of, until 2000 when the nights party started. One trip we had 21 days in discharging and loading and after 20 party nights boy were we glad to get back to sea for some real rest.
I remember the taxis there being the most unsafe cars on the road with mad drivers, poor brakes and rusty bodies. One of my all time favourite ports despite the bitter cold and feet of snow and ice.
Toronto was another great city. There was a great steak joint up on Yonge street that we all used to use but I cannot remember its name. I was in the C.P. hotel with a couple of other lads off the ship having a drink. It was Grey Cup day when the Calgary Rough Riders met Ottawa Giants for the final of the Canadian Football season. Hundreds of Calgary fans had made the trip in horse drawn chuck wagons and had set up camp in the parks or on the street. Whilst we were drinking in the bar one Calgary fan brought his horse into the hotel, put it in the baggage elevator, took it up a couple of floors and then walked it down the stairs to the bar, tied it up, calmly sat down and ordered a beer for himself. No one blinked an eye, just carried on drinking ......true story.
A few years later St. John NB had a street full of bars with topless go-go dancers etc.
Its main tourist attraction is the waterfall where the water runs "uphill" when the tide comes in. The rise and fall of the tides in the Bay of Fundy is one of the greatest in the world and the incoming tide overcomes the outflowing river to such an extent that the waterfall disappears under the tide.
Canada is definitely my all time favourite country and we would love to do the Trans Canada rail trip in order to see the interior, the Rockies etc.
rgds
JA

Richard Quartermaine
23rd April 2014, 11:56 AM
Thanks Jacyn. I think this was Sunnyside or perhaps Roncesvalles and Bloor. I lived around that area, When I first went to Toronto I stayed with my Uncle who immigrated to Canada after being demobbed from WW1 in Bradford, Yorks. He was with the post office I think until retirement, mainly in Oshawa I believe.
Here are two more photos, one of Queen Street and one of King or Bloor Streets.
I left Toronto in October 1955 before the subway was completed but did a trip there in 1978 and was amazed at how big it became from 650,000 to 4million!!
Cheers,
Richard

Jacyn Wade
23rd April 2014, 05:08 PM
Great old pics, Richard, thank you. You wouldn't recognize Toronto now. I barely recognize parts of it, and I've only been gone for 9 years. Definitely not the city it once was, regrettably.

---------- Post added at 01:08 PM ---------- Previous post was at 01:02 PM ----------

I believe from what I've been told Canada is very much like Australia, John - for the most part rugged and beautiful, except I think we're a lot colder in winter. Hockey is practically a religion here but we don't see too much lacrosse these days. Basketball and American football are the other two popular sports.

Keith at Tregenna
23rd April 2014, 05:25 PM
My plans are to visit Canada before the US, NZ before Oz, that is just me. K.

Keith Tindell
23rd April 2014, 06:08 PM
Agree with both of your choices there Keith, Canada and NZ beautiful countries. If i was unable to live where i do, and had to move abroad, it would be South Island NZ, just my preferences KT

robpage
23rd April 2014, 06:36 PM
Just because you are on Englands South Island I expect

Lou Barron
24th April 2014, 03:01 AM
Yes Keith post 26 You picked the best place in NZ and that could be Dunedin