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Keith at Tregenna
9th May 2013, 03:58 PM
A salute to the heroes of the Atlantic: Navy's aircraft carrier HMS Illustrious passes through Thames Barrier on visit to London to mark 70th anniversary of WW2 battle:

Britain's only aircraft carrier passed Thames Barrier and Canary on final visit to London before decommissioning

This month sees 70th anniversary of 'Black May', when Allies took decisive control of Atlantic shipping routes

Read more: Navy's aircraft carrier HMS Illustrious passes through Thames Barrier on visit to London | Mail Online (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2321799/Navys-aircraft-carrier-HMS-Illustrious-passes-Thames-Barrier-visit-London.html#ixzz2SoMW251M)

Ivan Cloherty
9th May 2013, 04:58 PM
The Press never get anything right stating that '35,000 Allied Troops' lost their lives, and there was me thinking it was 35,000 Merchant seamen; also stating that the battle last nearly as long as the war when in fact it was the whole length of the war plus a little bit, the last casualty being a Merchant Ship sunk after the Amnesty had been signed and declared. Will we ever win

robpage
9th May 2013, 05:09 PM
In sailing with Clan Line , who lost 30 Ships in World War II , there were several men who had been torpedoed , sank imprisoned . One Old Chief Engineer had been sunk three times , He , one night after a few wee ones was relating a story about sinking , and how cold the water was , but what struck me was how he described ingesting heavy oil floating on the surface , and how he had been coated in in , That was a fate , when described that you would not wish on any man .

Keith at Tregenna
9th May 2013, 06:31 PM
Something does not add up ? If 35,000 Merchant seamen were lost in the Battle of the Atlantic alone, there would have been relatively few losses in all other campaigns and maritime theatres of war, during the whole of WW2 ? Only ask as I now do not know, which ship was sunk in the Battle of the Atlantic after the war was over ?

Intrested to learn further.

Regard's,

Keith.

Ivan Cloherty
9th May 2013, 07:00 PM
Keith we are not nit picking over numbers here, I think you will find that total Allied losses were in the 50,000 circa region taking in the other war theatres and don't forget the Atlantic was from the Magellan Straits to Iceland. The point I was making is that the Merchant Navy either gets no mention or the ignorant people reporting do not know the difference between a troop and a Merchant Seamen and thus we are forgotten again.

The name of the ship lost after the amnesty escapes me at the moment but it has been mentioned on this site before and someone will remember it

Hugh
9th May 2013, 08:45 PM
Ivan,

'AVONDALE PARK' - Avondale Park - News - Scotsman.com (http://www.scotsman.com/news/avondale-park-1-465126)

Regards
Hugh

Captain Kong
9th May 2013, 08:57 PM
Several ships were lost to mines after WW2, I think the last one was the Adjutant of GSNC.around late 50s or 1960 in the North Sea and only just made ijmuden in Holland with a big hole in her.
I remember in the early 50s going through mine fields in the North Sea on our way to Hamburg,
The safe passages or channels marked on the charts. but mines have a habit of breaking free during storms and sometimes a ship got hit.
Cheers
Brian.

Keith at Tregenna
9th May 2013, 09:20 PM
Thanks Hugh:

The last actions of the Battle of the Atlantic were on 7/8 May. U-320 was the last U-boat sunk in action, by an RAF Catalina; while the Norwegian minesweeper NYMS 382 and the freighters Sneland I and Avondale Park were torpedoed in separate incidents, just hours before the German surrender.

The remaining U-boats, at sea or in port, were surrendered to the Allies, 174 in total. Most were destroyed in Operation Deadlight after the war

Keith at Tregenna
9th May 2013, 09:28 PM
Keith we are not nit picking

Sorry, was just as said confused by the post.

K.

j.sabourn
10th May 2013, 03:43 AM
As regards Brians post re minefields in the North Sea. There was a previous post a couple of eons ago about this. The corrections for such were in addition to Chart corrections landed usually on the 2nd. Mate. The light lists usually were corrected by the 3rd. mate. NEMEDRI was the book with all the positions covering the N.Sea and Meddy. Stood for if remember Northern Europe Mediterranean Routing instructions. There was also the volumes covering the Inland Seas of Japan called something else. If I remember correctly I was 2nd. Mate until 1960 and books were still in force then. John Sabourn

Ivan Cloherty
10th May 2013, 07:21 AM
As regards Brians post re minefields in the North Sea. There was a previous post a couple of eons ago about this. The corrections for such were in addition to Chart corrections landed usually on the 2nd. Mate. The light lists usually were corrected by the 3rd. mate. NEMEDRI was the book with all the positions covering the N.Sea and Meddy. Stood for if remember Northern Europe Mediterranean Routing instructions. There was also the volumes covering the Inland Seas of Japan called something else. If I remember correctly I was 2nd. Mate until 1960 and books were still in force then. John Sabourn

Remember the NEMEDRI, also cannot remember the name of the Japanese version. We were still getting updates to the Master Copy of DEMS held in Head Office when I was Supt in the 70's. The key being held by the Managing Director but self doing updates.