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Captain Kong
27th April 2013, 02:33 PM
I was rooting about in an old box full of the rubbish that accumilates over years.

I found my Genuine Fake Rolex Oyster watch.
It brought back a few memories of when I used to wear it in the 50s when I was in the Cunard ships.
I had blond curly hair brushed back to a near DA, a semi drape pale blue suit, a white shark skin shirt, a tie from Tie City Broadway, New York.
white nylon ankle socks, and brown camel skin shoes from Port Said. and Fruit of the Loom Boxer shorts with all kinds of patterns on, underneath.
To walk into the Locarno or the Grafton dance halls in Liverpool was great, flashing the Genuine Fake watch, a packet of Luckies in the top pocket, a Mid Atlantic accent. Casually dropping a Dollar Bill when looking through the wallet for a pound note.
I must have looked a right twot, no wonder I never copped off.
Memories are embarrassing.
Cheers
Brian.

alf corbyn
27th April 2013, 03:05 PM
hi brian. i hope you knew how to tear the top of your luckies to expose the first four ciggies and be able to flick one into your mouth from chest height and not forgetting the hunters matches with the blue top and white centre so you could strike them with your nail or on your well scrubbed and whitened jeans.

Captain Kong
27th April 2013, 03:10 PM
Thats right Alf, we knew all the tricks, after seeing all those great movies with real Stars in, James Cagney, Humphrey Bogart, George Raft, and so on.
We copied them and we felt we were a part of the movies, life in the 50s on the New York Run was Showtime. I wouldnt have missed it for anything.
Can never happen again, We had it all and thought it would never end,
It did.
Cheers
Brian.

Stuart Henderson
27th April 2013, 05:38 PM
Yes brings back many memories. Dont think I was ever a "Genuine" Cunard Yank even though I sailed with Cunard from 58 to 1972 mainly on the cargo ships. Great times,great runs, greatcompany and lots of great crews.. Did buy gear from Macys muchbetter variety back then and always carried packet of Lucky Strike even though I was a non smoker and there was always plenty of takers in the pubs back home. Great place to spin yarns about too ,New York City,Boston ,Philly Baltimore.
Like Brian am a great fan of the old Queen Mary and was very pleased to be able to take my wife Ann as a passen
ger round trip to NYC on on e of her last voyages. Cunard treated us very well and special crew price,truly a trip to remember.
Stuart

Neville Roberts
27th April 2013, 06:05 PM
I sailed on the Sylvania with a bunch of us who were called the holliwood boys, still cant figure out why acept maybe for the posing we did for the Yank girl students that were going on the european tour . we were also on the carinthia .but that was to montyplonk.then on the caronia for the pacific and far east cruise . never did catch on to the yank thing . butmany a bell boy on thier first trip over to NYC came home with a phony yank acent. had to clip em over the earole sometimes .:cool:

Duke Drennan
27th April 2013, 07:20 PM
Was never on a Cunard boat but went a few times on tramps in the mid 60's. My usual jaunt was the subway up to Washington Square and walk over the street to Greenwich Village to hear the folk singers in Gerde's.

cappy
27th April 2013, 08:13 PM
we could walk the walk we could talk the talk not just in our street or town or city or country but in the whole world we were kings of the world and we didn't give a toss for any but our own we were tall men regards to all of us cappy we were the best

John Callon
27th April 2013, 08:52 PM
Agree with all of your comments cappy, we were the likes never to be seen again. I wonder how the youth of today would fare in the Merchant Navy as we new it.
Regards
John

Captain Kong
27th April 2013, 09:00 PM
We were the last of the Seafarers,
Our likes will never be seen again.
Sad
Brian.

Don Rafferty
27th April 2013, 09:13 PM
I found my Genuine Fake Rolex Oyster watch.

Cheers
Brian.


Does it still work - old enough now to be a collectors item.

Captain Kong
27th April 2013, 10:11 PM
No Don,
It is knackered as I am. It stopped a long time ago but I was always reluctant to throw it away.
Memories I guess.
Cheers
Brian.

Richard Quartermaine
27th April 2013, 11:25 PM
Not a Cunard Yank but Port Line was Cunard anyway...

Easter 1950 - sporting a DA, thick sponge soled brothel creepers that would cause a champeen skate boarder of nowadays to fall a**se over tit on a wet pavement and a ticket on the Golden Arrow to Paris to see a topless Dorothy Lamour in "Aloma of the South seas". Blimey! Curves you'd never get the chance to see on the Golden Arrow end of the Fleche D'or.

Richard

Richard Quartermaine
27th April 2013, 11:48 PM
New York, March 1947, 16 and 2 weeks 'old', from Sydney, to Tahiti, Pitcairn, past the Galapagos Islands, Panama, Curacao, a whopping great storm off Cape Hatteras and up the Hudson to Hoboken, NJ. You couldn't have knocked the grin off my face with a cricket bat! I'm second from the left.
Richard.

Duke Drennan
28th April 2013, 12:10 AM
What an experience for a 16 year old, the rest of us too at the same age. These days, they're still being breast fed at that age.

Richard Quartermaine
28th April 2013, 07:06 AM
Leaving the SS Gothic in March 1953 I thought it would be a good idea to visit my mother's brother in Toronto to where he immigrated after being demobbed after the first world war. It was great - I stayed for nearly three years. Anyway, I was lucky enough to get a passage on the QE to New York from where I took the train to Toronto.

Here are some pics related to the voyage. Maybe one of you were on that voyage and knew the deck steward I photographed.

Richard

1263912640126411264212643

Richard Quartermaine
28th April 2013, 07:28 AM
Here are some more photos. Incidentally, I saw The Duke of Windsor was on the wing of the Bridge as we sailed into New York.

Violin Please - "Ahhh! Those were the days my friends"

Richard

Captain Kong
28th April 2013, 07:45 AM
Thanks for the memories Richard. It can never happen again
I think the 50s were the best years for us. we thought it would never end , but it did.


Cheers
Brian

leratty
28th April 2013, 09:07 AM
Capt. Kong, yes true 'the last of the seafarers' I was so lucky to come in on the end or twilight of the era. One to be remembered with great fondness & some great, ships & friendships formed, even to day we can see each other & it is as if we have only been away a short time. Those I see are but few now, one in Aus, he emigrated, who has gone I reckon Troppo. Just dropped out lives in the bush, sees no one, communicates with only his children sits a vegetates, a true grumpy old man.

Keith Tindell
28th April 2013, 09:15 AM
truly remarkable era, pick and choose your ships, home trade in the summer if you wished, then fg somewhere warm. Didnt always pan out, i remember one trip to the good old Med that went wrong, straight through the Med , into the Black sea to Bulgaria and up to Yalta, froze my poor little nuts off, and no where to go ashore. I am still in contact with a few old shipmates, by email, as they are spread far and wide now. We can however live with good memories, much better memories than if we had worked in a factory or whatever. KT

Ron B Manderson
28th April 2013, 12:07 PM
I have a dvd called "the cunard yanks" if you need one Brian.
Ron the batcave

Jim Brady
28th April 2013, 12:18 PM
I have a dvd called "the cunard yanks" if you need one Brian.
Ron the batcave

I sailed with a few of those that are on that video and in fact Ritchie (I cant remember his surname right now) who wrote for various Musical Papers was doing a book signing recently not far from here.I don't know if the book was music or about the sea.
Regards.
Jim.B.

Captain Kong
28th April 2013, 01:02 PM
Hi Ron,
I have the DVD CUNARD YANKS. very interesting. What it shows brought back the memories of those halcyon days, on Broadway , the Diner, the Fashion shops, great suits, and bringing home the gear, the Salvation Army shop on 8th Avenue, the big famous bands in the clubs, the Dorseys etc, the music and records that were not out in England for many months.
From the Sally Army we bought Washing machines, $5, Fridges 5, Beautiful suits from $10 with bullet holes in the back , they came from the Morgue and dry cleaned. and some of the Stewards who were loaded, bought big American cars in the Auction ariound pier 23. We loaded them for them and got a dropsy, Cunard allowed them to bring them home to Liverpool, for free, then we unloaded them at the Pier Head.
Wonderful days.
Cheers
Brian
.
PS. JIM I did hear that Ritchie Barton had died last October, I hope I am wrong. Can you find out. I did meet him a couple of times.
.
.
Here is the DVD.
"They sailed from Liverpool and brought home the world."

Kenneth Kenny
28th April 2013, 01:25 PM
Hi Jim,the Wife and Myself,Tom Kirby(on the Site)and his Wife May,went to the Philomonic Hall in Liverpool to see the Film of the Cunard Yank's on there,2008,all them great Cunard lads were there with there Wife's,good Show,looking at the Programe from the show now.the head line Souled out Film's Present.Liverpol's Cunard Yank's.Ken.

Jim Brady
28th April 2013, 05:34 PM
I've just been in the Seamens Mission as I knew that there was a Croatian ship in and I have connections with Croatia.Had a few beers with some of the crew,they are running coal from Russia to here on a regular run and maybe pick something up on the way back from time to time.They are sitting there with their laptops or maybe just sitting there having a beer what a miserable life.We have had stories on here from the 40's and 50's if you told shoreside people about them they would look at you as though you were mad.So Russia don't go ashore Liverpool go to the mission,what a life.Years ago (they are in the Gladstone ) they would've been ashore in the Caradoc,the Royal,the Winnie,the Elm House.The Bootle Arms or even further along at Mables and thats what it was all about,but not anymore how sad!!!
Regards.
Jim.B.

happy daze john in oz
29th April 2013, 06:07 AM
Agree with all of your comments cappy, we were the likes never to be seen again. I wonder how the youth of today would fare in the Merchant Navy as we new it.
Regards
John

Something about changing their underpants comes to mind. But of course many would be at home with the 'gay marriage' brigade.

happy daze john in oz
29th April 2013, 06:12 AM
Remember seeing the 'Cunard Yanks' in the Soutampton pubs and bars. Looking slick and with a one pound note stuck in the wrist band of their watch. Some looked good, but some real plonkers.

happy daze john in oz
29th April 2013, 06:13 AM
No Don,
It is knackered as I am. It stopped a long time ago but I was always reluctant to throw it away.
Memories I guess.
Cheers
Brian.

I am sure Brian thta nice Mr. **** could get a price in the market for you on it.

Jim Brady
29th April 2013, 11:06 AM
Brian,I couldn't be sure about Ritchie Barton but I did hear the name mentioned on the radio for a book signing in a book shop in Formby,an unusual name so I presumed it was the Ritchie that we knew.I went on line googled Ritchie Barton writer quite a bit there,he has his own website Liverpool Lullabies Mersey Memories very interesting CPR and Cunard stories and pictures.
Regards

http://www.cunardyanks.org/index.htm

Stuart Henderson
29th April 2013, 11:50 AM
Was never on a Cunard boat but went a few times on tramps in the mid 60's. My usual jaunt was the subway up to Washington Square and walk over the street to Greenwich Village to hear the folk singers in Gerde's.

Never went to that one, But my favourite in the 60s in Greenwich village was "His Father Moustache". Great music, big jugs of ice cold beer, great atmosphere and always a warm welcome. Remember on Cunard cargo boats we started using Pier 52 instead of the 90s passenger piers and it was much closer and easier to stagger home.....
Stuart

Captain Kong
29th April 2013, 03:02 PM
Hi Jim,
I have scoured the Tinternet, no signs of it. He has an excellent site CUNARD YANKS , all on google. some excellent sites on there about the lads in Cunard.
So I am afraid that reports of his death are Rather premature or exagerated. Good.
His site and the others do bring back a lot of memories.
I was in the Eldonian Club a few years ago having a few bevies with my mate Tommy.......
a quite well known character, wont mention his name to save him embarrassment, we used to appear on the Billy Butler Show on Magic 1547 in Stanley Street, with Billy and Wally, in the
90s, as two drunks.
Well in the club one Thursday afternoon A couple of Interviewers from a TV Company wanted to interview Seamen for the Cunard Yanks programme. and took them outside to sit at the tables to be interviewed two at a time. Tommy and I went out and sat with them, they wanted memories of our seafaring days, Tommy being more than a little bevied couldnt stop burbling, and eventually ended up talikng about bagging off in Valparaiso with Maria of the wooden leg fame, and soon the interview was terminated. And I lost a chance of going on a free trip to New York.
The three lads they chose were excellent in their memories and knowledge of New York and put on an excellent show.
Looking back it sure was a very interesting time in the 50s from a bomb damaged dark Liverpool and a week later to be in a technicolour world a few minutes walk up 52nd Street from the Diner onto Broadway and Times Square, just like Hollywood.

Good memories I am glad I never missed it.
Cheers
Brian.

Jim Brady
29th April 2013, 03:19 PM
Brian,some good stories and great pictures on that site,did you read the poem on the card game under tall tales very funny.
Regards.
Jim>B.

Captain Kong
29th April 2013, 04:01 PM
Hi Jim not got around to that one yet, but a very entertaining site..
.
Cunard Yanks (http://www.cunardyanks.org)
.
A lot of names on there are very familiar, I sailed with a lot of those men.

On Tall Tales, 5. there was a piece about some of the lads trying to get tickets for the Opening ceremony of the New Cruise Terminal, when the QE2 came in.
I got a ticket for Anne and me. I told them that I was a reporter for the `Vindi News` and they sent me two tickets , no probs. We were stood next to the Duke of Kent and chatting to Mike McCartney, then went on board for lunch afterwards a coach to the Anglican Cathedral, a big show on there, we met up with Jimmy Saville who we knew from previous voyages on QE2. A good day out,. Unfortunately the old guys who should have been there were excluded. men who were Cunard and the Veterans all excluded. Most of the guests had never sailed on a Cunard ship or indeed any ship.
Brian.

John Dunn
11th November 2014, 05:52 PM
Ivernia December 1966 June 1967 Deck boy to OS, Cunard cowboys was what I found out some of the older guys were called in Liverpool. I did not become one as I was of a different generation, started drinking in the Market Diner 52 street then me and the two apprentices would go down to Greenwich village. Hung out at a club called the Cafe go go James Cotton Blues band and Jimmy Hendricks, great times though I was a little cautious when I first joined her in Liverpool right out of Gravesend Peanut factory, asked where the crew was and was told to go over the road to a pub, full of sailors and dockers, introduced myself to the crew and they proceeded to get me drunk, in came one of the apprentices to tell us to return as we were sailing they got him drunk too then came the second mate so off we all went drunk to get the ship out of the harbour into the River , next morning i was hauled up in front of the captain and given a talk on being influenced by the crew and how he did not want to see me before him again. Sea sick for 3 days until Christmas morning then the bosuns mate Tansy came into my cabin and gave me a shot of booze which straightened me out and was able to eat Christmas dinner. Some of the roughest weather crossing that Atlantic, icebergs etc , chipping icicles from the rigging with snow on deck and the Captain taking pictures of his wife while we were hanging in the rigging, I think I was in a bosuns chair doing the fore stay. Good fun for a young lad from Yorkshire , of course I got two nicknames Yorky and Lofty due to being a 6 footer among the 5 foot Liverpudlians, this served me well one stormy night when all hands were called out to re-rig a container on deck which had bust the chains, rigging up a derrick and a windless we worked hard to get the container back on the tracks and chained down again, heaved too some one would shout hold on as a wave broke over the bow and instantly flooded the deck, holding on for your life the water rose very fast swirling around our feet then in an instant up to my neck then in another instant gone, of course the short Liverpool guys were all under water as even I had to go up on my tip toes to avoid being submerged myself. I always figured they were called Cunard Cowboys because we all had jeans [ US2.25 a pair]and jean jackets [ Us3.25] but some of the older guys wore cowboy boots too when going ashore. one guy Merv the perv was always going to the porn shows on 42 street. one Ab I remember was called Bobby, Those were the days all right , stayed in the merch until 71 then in 72 came to BC Canada and became a fisherman owning two boats over the past 40 years , one still with me though now on blocks at the farm 41 foot Halibut Schooner style boat with the cabin on the stern, had two deckhands, long lined Halibut , Cod, Shark and did Prawn fishing until I retired. Those were the days foot loose and fancy free, American girls were aplenty, a little blarney and away you went. Jack Dempsey bar, Market Diner and too many adventures to write here good memories.

gray_marian
13th November 2014, 01:49 PM
#33, 'many adventures' John, The more the merrier:) New stories appreciated. Welcome to the site.

Keith Moody
13th November 2014, 04:31 PM
Stuart, #29 I too have spent a consierable time in "your fathers" good atmosphere but you left out the fact that they showed silent films thoughout, also something not usualy allowed was the saw dust on the floor, and the girls were not bad to look at either.
keith moody
R635978

happy daze john in oz
14th November 2014, 05:08 AM
Never a Cunard Yank myself but remember the numbers of them that drank in Skullards Bar in Southampton. For some reason many of them would stuff a one pound note behind their watch band, bloody odd lot!

John Pruden
14th November 2014, 06:50 AM
my next door neighbour Eddie DEAN and a friend albert WILD both cunard yanks and still are even in their 70s just to name a few? jp

Ron B Manderson
14th November 2014, 02:35 PM
I still have song book we used in New Orleans " fathers "
Seems a long time ago.
Ron the batcave

j.sabourn
15th November 2014, 12:33 AM
For those who worked in the North Sea oil and exploration in earlier years well may remember some of the oil rig workers ashore in Aberdeen. The going gear for some was the obligatory Red Wing working boots, chequered shirt and jeans. Some went so far as to try and emulate an American accent, until they had one too many and broke into their normal accents be it scouse, Scottish, Geordie or whatever. Don't know who they thought they were fooling, certainly not the local girls. However I suppose many played out their fantacys. Suppose they would also be embarrassed now Brian, although suppose also made it to carry on in later life. Maybe it worked for some and they did manage to fool some of their employers. JS

leonard hotchkiss
20th May 2016, 07:38 PM
i was on cunard from 1960 till 69 from the Maure - Mary -Lizzie - franc - corona asst butcher, company contract so jumped about quite a bit ,20403 altho not exactly in catering thought of myself a cunard yank on the left in the pic

Captain Kong
21st May 2016, 07:24 AM
This was in the Liverpool Echo in 1960 The crowd off the old Franconia in 1956. Don't know what happened to the other lads, in the Crown on Lime Street,
Joe Finnegan now lives in Rockingham south of Perth,
Tommy Lawless died young , I believe from too much drink,
Both were excellent Guitar players and singers, entertaining us in the Pig.
They both won the Carol Levies Show on TV and could have had a great musical; career but carried on seafaring.
I still see Joe every couple of years in Perth.
We had it all in those austere days of the 1950s, Smart snappy suits from New York, a genuine fake Rolex on the wrist, a Tie from Tie City on Broadway, a packet of Luckies in the top pocket, a western ocean roll a Mid Atlantic accent. and the latest records that you couldn't buy in the UK for at least a year and the girls couldn't get enough of us as we brought in the 15 denier Nylons stockings they could` nt yet buy over here.
What a great life. now sadly all gone.
here are some links......................
Cheers
Brian
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O7V520MqpmY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X5xjcGcCkBk

Cunard Yanks Gallery (http://www.cunardyanks.org/gallery.htm)



https://www.closeupfilmcentre.com/vertigo_magazine/volume-2.../the-cunard-yanks/

john gill
21st May 2016, 07:48 AM
#41. Nice picture. All smartly dressed, slightly the worse for wear, probably taken in either the Legs of Man pub or The Queens in Queen Square where the Law Courts now stand. Those who have an eye for detail might suggest they're all drinking Brown Mixed.

Captain Kong
21st May 2016, 07:51 AM
Hi Gilly, in the 50s we all drank in the Crown on Lime Street, better looking barmaids there.
and you are right a Brown Mixed was the drink at the time.

Cheers
Brian

Jim Brady
21st May 2016, 08:02 AM
I've still got a couple of photos taken by the mobile photographer who travelled around the pubs,one thing about him he never failed to deliver.He charged half a crown a photo all hands wanted one so in that photo posted by Brian the photographer would've got himself 15 bob,they were all sent to one address.
Regards.
Jim.B.

joseph connor
21st May 2016, 04:34 PM
#41. Nice picture. All smartly dressed, slightly the worse for wear, probably taken in either the Legs of Man pub or The Queens in Queen Square where the Law Courts now stand. Those who have an eye for detail might suggest they're all drinking Brown Mixed.
What else was there ? apart from bitter which used to give me a banging head ,our choice was limited then was,nt it ? I drank in the yankie bar ,the dive , or a bit down the road Dollies .
Always wore my U S navy pea coat ,( as mentioned before) with a Royal naval roll neck sweater ? thought I looked great , as Brian said what a plonker, used to cop off though .Did those days really happen , seem so unlikely now ? .

Dennis McGuckin
21st May 2016, 05:08 PM
20408
Along the same lines.
Taken in Manchester. Most likely in The Clews.

Ivan Cloherty
21st May 2016, 05:28 PM
In those days most of us dressed well when going ashore regardless of your position on the ship, it was a way of leaving the smell of paint, cooking, slops behind you and entering a different world where you were a 48 hour millionaire and dressed accordingly, bluddy happy days, which today's seafarers have no hope of replicating, we sailed at the right time and no one can take it away from us, and we are still sailing!!, long may it continue

joseph connor
21st May 2016, 05:36 PM
In those days most of us dressed well when going ashore regardless of your position on the ship, it was a way of leaving the smell of paint, cooking, slops behind you and entering a different world where you were a 48 hour millionaire and dressed accordingly, bluddy happy days, which today's seafarers have no hope of replicating, we sailed at the right time and no one can take it away from us, and we are still sailing!!, long may it continue
I did dress smartly most of the time , honest .LOL.

Captain Kong
21st May 2016, 08:47 PM
We were the last of the Seafarers,
the world will not see our likes again.
Amen
Brian

John Callon
21st May 2016, 10:40 PM
We should all give thanks Brian to our mighty Lord for giving us the priviledge of getting rat arsed globally, frequenting every dive under the sun to get a drink and getting to know the local females (in other words bagging off) being able to virtually pick which ship you wanted to sail on and get paid at the same time. And then coming home on leave, flushed if you had a good pay off when everyday was like Christmas until the money ran out and then back to sea. Christ what days they were. As you say nobody will ever see the likes of again.
Regards
John C

john gill
21st May 2016, 10:53 PM
i was on cunard from 1960 till 69 from the Maure - Mary -Lizzie - franc - corona asst butcher, company contract so jumped about quite a bit ,20403 altho not exactly in catering thought of myself a cunard yank on the left in the pic

Interesting to note the 'No Smoking' sign on the bulkhead and at least two of the Cunard Yanks puffing away on what looked like Players cigarettes being smoked from the packet perched atop a ketchup bottle. No health and safety rules in Cunard's butchers departments in the 60's.

Dennis McGuckin
21st May 2016, 11:21 PM
Of course my previous post should have read The Clews Pub, Salford.Some on site must remember that place.
Their was a woman who frequented the pub.
We called her the shore bosun.
Built like a brick karzi.
Used to work the docks in the war years.
Heard one story where a cadet beat up her son.
She waited for him.
Picked him up, stuck his legs between some railings, and pulled.
Don't think he ever walked again without a bad limp. I got along with her well.
Always made sure she had a pint.
Salford in the 50ies-60ies was one tough place.

j.sabourn
22nd May 2016, 01:30 AM
#52 Think it must be the same pub was in, in the 50"s Dennis. When I came to in the morning was thankful had passed out the night before. My companion wanted two half crowns for her grandchildren she said. Think I was 3 mate at time so must have been about 1957, or it could have been before that, but cant see me having two half crowns to give away then. There used to be a granary there and think we were discharging part grain cargo. Cheers JS

John Arton
22nd May 2016, 07:38 AM
Looking at the pictures of passengers on the Queens, in a number of shots they appear to be lounging on deck by huge intake fans. I assume those grills behind them were for the force draft fans for the boiler rooms. Would they not be terribly noisy? Remember on the Canada all the boiler room fan intakes were situated around the funnel and the deck there was not accessible to the passengers.
rgds
JA
p.s. for those of you with vivid imagination, my reference to "force draft fans" has nothing to do with the occupants of fluff alleyway. LOL

cappy
22nd May 2016, 07:56 AM
We should all give thanks Brian to our mighty Lord for giving us the priviledge of getting rat arsed globally, frequenting every dive under the sun to get a drink and getting to know the local females (in other words bagging off) being able to virtually pick which ship you wanted to sail on and get paid at the same time. And then coming home on leave, flushed if you had a good pay off when everyday was like Christmas until the money ran out and then back to sea. Christ what days they were. As you say nobody will ever see the likes of again.
Regards
John Ctears in me eyes thinking about it .....and i thinkhow sad that life is not there for young men today.......cappy

Jim Brady
22nd May 2016, 08:01 AM
I was talking to a guy once and he refered to this big woman as a four strap job,I said it's what you call a forced draft job.No he said her bust was that big that she had to have four straps on her bra,never heard of that one myself.
Regards.
Jim.b.

leonard hotchkiss
27th May 2016, 12:32 PM
it will never change

Des Taff Jenkins
28th May 2016, 12:50 AM
Of course my previous post should have read The Clews Pub, Salford.Some on site must remember that place.
Their was a woman who frequented the pub.
We called her the shore bosun.
Built like a brick karzi.

Used to work the docks in the war years.
Heard one story where a cadet beat up her son.
She waited for him.
Picked him up, stuck his legs between some railings, and pulled.
Don't think he ever walked again without a bad limp. I got along with her well.
Always made sure she had a pint.
Salford in the 50ies-60ies was one tough place.
Hi Dennis.
Brought back some memories, the Clews in Manchester 1951, We were all having a drink in the Clews; our second cook a very big handsome bastward chatting up a couple of nice looking girls in there, the barman warned him to forget about them, but he persisted and went off with one of them, next day no second cook, he was in hospital not looking handsome anymore, had his faced slashed with a razor, was all prepared to go looking for the bloke's, but the cops put him on a train for London his home port, told him if he joined a ship coming to Manchester to jump it. Went for a drink there later and the girls were there with some big tough looking blokes, no acknowledgement from us. I think that big shore bosun was in there everytime we went.
Cheers Des

Brian Charles Williams
14th October 2016, 12:24 PM
How right you are Brian....regards BW.

Ron Kendall
19th October 2016, 07:45 PM
My Rolex Oyster perpetual day and date genuine fake watch, was in a drawer for about 15 years. No one could get the back off to change the battery. A chap I know, prised the back off, It does not unscrew!. It is now going strong, and cost 6 in Las Palmas about 18years ago

Captain Kong
19th October 2016, 08:36 PM
I got my Genuine Fake Rolex Oyster Watch in Tangier in 1955, about 5, I think a young Lady in South America borrowed it one night when I was sleeping.
Cheers
Brian

Doc Vernon
19th October 2016, 09:11 PM
Oh Boy!
Tangiers what a place of intrigue and love in the days gone by!
Cheers

happy daze john in oz
20th October 2016, 05:04 AM
Cunard Yanks, remember Skullards bar in Southampton where many of them would gather at night to drink. They stood out like the proverbial for some reason, most had flashy watches and would often sit with a pound note stuck under the watch band ready to pay for the next drink.

Shirley Rawlings
7th March 2017, 07:54 PM
Hi. I love this site. You all sound just like my dad. Sadly he passed away in Saturday 4th March 2017. I'm loving all the stories and have heard many of them from my dad, his name is Lenny Jones and I know he sailed to all of those lovely places. The merchant navy was his life and I am desperately searching for an article in the Daily Graphic from 1948. I think around November. When dad was in the paper as the youngest ever whaler on the factory ship the Baelena can anyone enlighten me. I would be eternally grateful. Xxxxx

Captain Kong
7th March 2017, 08:41 PM
Hi Shirley
So sorry to hear that your Dad has passed away.
I have found a photo of the Balaena,
Just click on the thumb nail.
There are quite a few Liverpool fellas on here maybe one will know your Dad.
Thanks for calling,
Cheers
Brian.

Charlie Hannah
8th March 2017, 12:12 AM
Sincere Condolence on your Dads passing Shirley. R.I.P.

Shirley Rawlings
9th March 2017, 07:16 PM
Thanks Brian. Dad loved the sea and I'm still desperately trying to find the article in the daily graphic from 1948. Hopefully someone will know of it. Xxx

John Pruden
25th April 2017, 08:48 PM
it was on tv so there must be copies somewhere try the likes of net flix they say they have thousands of tv films worth a try??but keep looking try maritime museum Liverpool they may help.. jp

gray_marian
26th April 2017, 12:23 AM
#68, Hi Helen, If you go to top of the page and type in Cunard Yank in the search box top right several threads on the subject will appear. The film you refer to is no longer available on site but their is another short one supplied by our member Capt' Kong who is on a cruise at present. Other posts too from various members.:)

Cunard Yanks,
click on this for a 7 minute clip

https://youtu.be/O7V520MqpmY



Cunard Yanks Where Are They Now



Cunard Yanks Where Are They Now

Doc Vernon
26th April 2017, 12:44 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X5xjcGcCkBk

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R8jy31mC47M This one the same is from Souled Out Films

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FD4lMsYoOcE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SxSDHxNqk14

Jane meadows
21st January 2018, 05:07 PM
my next door neighbour Eddie DEAN and a friend albert WILD both cunard yanks and still are even in their 70s just to name a few? jp

I believe Eddie dean was a friend of tommy Hesketh . I worked in the laundry on the empress of Canada

Jim Brady
21st January 2018, 05:14 PM
I sailed with Tommy Hesketh on the Britain and I know Eddie quite well they did live in the same area so could've been friends I suppose.
Regards.
Jim.b.