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Tony Wilding
8th March 2013, 02:33 PM
When referring to a Ship as being double banked, is that referring to double banked lifeboats. ?

john sutton
8th March 2013, 03:42 PM
it means tied up alongside another ship thats tied up at the quay
john sutton

john gill
8th March 2013, 03:58 PM
When i was a gloryhole steward aboard the Capetown Castle the term double banked sometimes applied to the practice of when shaking one occupant of a bunk for turn to, two fell out.
gilly

alf corbyn
8th March 2013, 04:06 PM
it refered to the roman triremes ie double banked oars. well it was in my day haha

Ian Malcolm
8th March 2013, 05:54 PM
This was common practice in Algiers during WWII.

Regards

Ian

Tony Wilding
8th March 2013, 07:38 PM
this question was posted on another site, but no replies then, it referred to the Film San Demetrio, London, when they abandoned Ship and were in the Lifeboat another Ship was sighted Hull down on the Horizon, the Second Mate said , she is a double banker, ? ? if She was Hull down you would only see her Funnels, ? maybe 2 funneled ?

Captain Kong
8th March 2013, 08:28 PM
I only ever heard of a `double banked set of oars.`

Robert T. Bush
8th March 2013, 09:38 PM
I remember the Custom was for the ship with the highest freeboard to provide the gangway. There were sometimes three and four ships tied up to gether.

robpage
8th March 2013, 09:52 PM
dou·ble-bank <embed type="application/x-shockwave-flash" src="http://static.sfdict.com/dictstatic/d/g/speaker.swf" width="17" height="15" id="speaker" align="texttop" quality="high" loop="false" menu="false" salign="t" allowscriptaccess="sameDomain" wmode="transparent" flashvars="soundUrl=http://static.sfdict.com/dictstatic/dictionary/audio/luna/D04/D0482400.mp3"> [duhb-uhhttp://static.sfdict.com/dictstatic/dictionary/graphics/luna/thinsp.pnghttp://static.sfdict.com/dictstatic/dictionary/graphics/luna/thinsp.pngl-bangk] Show IPA
verb (used with object) Nautical .1.to have two rowers pull (each of a number of oars).

2.to have people pull (a rope) from both sides.

3.to row (a boat) with rowers for both sides on each thwart.



Origin:
1825–35

But Baltic chartering BIMCO have a long clause about it at https://www.bimco.org/en/Chartering/Special_Circulars/SC2008_03.aspx

j.sabourn
9th March 2013, 05:54 AM
As post 7 two oarsmen sitting on the same thwart. (not on each others knees) John Sabourn

Roger Dyer
9th March 2013, 09:12 AM
Although I feel sure there is more than one explanation for the term 'double-banked', my own experience would support the opinions offered by John Sutton (#2) and Bob Bush (# 8), when applied to two or more vessels lying alongside one another at a dockside or on a mooring. Here in Oz it is also known by members of the boating fraternity as 'rafting-up' when,on a Saturday night (or any other night come to that), several boats 'double-bank' for the purpose of having a party. One beautiful summer evening, several years ago, whilst on the Hawkesbury River (near Sydney), I witnessed 12 pleasure craft (of varying lengths up to 50 feet), all double-banked to the largest vessel which was on a mooring buoy. Certainly not best practice, it had the potential of being bl--dy dangerous, but on that particular occasion the fates were kind and the 'revellers' survived without mishap.

Many years ago when on the London -Niemegen - Cologne run with G.S.N.C. ships, I recall that the practise of 'double-banking', as I knew it then, was very common amongst the large motorised-barges on the Maas and Rhine rivers. On one memorable occasion, whilst on the 'Alouette', we arrived at Lobith on the Dutch-German border where we were required to tie-up to a barge (the outer-most of three from the river-bank). With uncommon agility (for me, that is), I went down the pilot-ladder onto the barge and then, dragging a gantline behind me (it had been made fast to a headrope) I managed to hop from one barge to another until safely on the grass-covered river bank. I then had the task of hauling the headrope over to a large stake which was embedded in the ground at the top of the bank, all of which required considerable effort. I received no word of gratitude from Captain Baker or any of my other shipmates, however, I sensed that the small group of Fresian cows that stood nearby watching my performance would have applauded had they been able to. Yes, I'm familiar with the term 'double-banked':rolleyes:


..............Roger

j.sabourn
9th March 2013, 10:34 AM
2 full pints of beer standing on the bar counter. John Sabourn

cappy
9th March 2013, 11:52 AM
that's kind of you john wot u having regards cappy

Louis the Amigo
11th March 2013, 11:15 AM
Hi shipmates, Double banked was the oars in the olden times my wifes uncle George was on a wooden ship with oars and big whips used by !st mates {The bosuns job} was to bang the big drum, only did 5 years on it, short trip around the med so he told us???? Double banked min of two pints, at last orders in any pub or club I drink any beer/ or rum in doubles.

cappy
11th March 2013, 11:20 AM
bet the pool emptied quick when that bugger came in regards cappy

john gill
13th March 2013, 04:04 PM
We were in a bar in north Florida a couple of years back and i ordered a beer with a bourbon chaser. The barmaid gave me an odd look but served the drinks. After a few more the barmaid became a bit more friendlier and pointed out that the practise of doubling up your order, although not disallowed was frowned upon ''round these parts''. a glance round the bar did confirm this, but i was a bit put out by being referred to as a Double Fister. The mind boggles conjuring up what else that phrase might refer to. A similar thing happened in a restaurant bar in Central Park NY. Ordered a beer, took a few sips ( to put a lining on my stomach) and ordered a Gin & tonic. Barman placed the g&t on the bar and whipped my beer away and emptied it down the sink! Of course i did protest quite loudly, got my beer replaced but it seems to be a case of ''When in Rome.....''
gilly

Stan Carter
13th March 2013, 08:53 PM
JOHN'S STORY OF DOUBLING UP WITH DRINKS IN FLORIDA BROUGHT AN EXPERIENCE TO MIND, ALSO IN FLORIDA. QUITE A FEW YEARS AGO WHILE IN FLORIDA WITH MY WIFE AND A BUDDY, WE WERE IN DAYTONA AND LAYING ON THE BEACH WHEN WE WERE GIVEN A FLYER ADVERTISING A LOCAL BAR. FOR $5.00 COVER CHARGE, YOU GOT TO DRINK FREE BEER FROM 6-9 PM. MY BUDDY AND i, ALREADY INTO IT FROM THE TRUNK OF THE CAR, FIGURED THIS TO BE A GOOD DEAL. SO AT 5.55PM WE WERE 1ST IN LINE AND PAID OUR COVER CHARGE AND ORDERED THE ROUND , A FANCY DRINK FOR THE WIFE, AS SHE WAS DRIVING, A TWO DRINK LIMIT. WE FIGURED 3X $5.00. PLUS APPROX $10.00 FOR THE WIFE, WE FIGURED WE COULD REALLY GET OUR MONIES WORTH. THE BAR WAS A FAVOURITE FOR THE COLLEGE KIDS ON SPRING BREAK, WHO SEEMED TO GET PI..SED PRETTY QUICKLY AND ROWDY. AND WOULD BE SORTED OUT BY THE BOUNCERS PRETTY QUICKLY.. I MIGHT ADD THAT THE BOUNCERS WERE MEMBERS OF THE HELLS ANGLES MC CLUB. AS THE NIGHT PROGRESSED WE WORKED ON GETTING OUR MONIES WORTH AND FINALLY THE WAITER CAME OVER AND ASKED IF WE WERE CANADIANS, AS IT SEEMED THE BEER WAS'NT HAVING TO MUCH OF AN EFFECT ON US, AS WE WERE USED TO THE HIGHER ALCOHOL CONTENT IN CANADA,, WE WERE GETTING ON SO WELL WITH THE WAITER AND HE STARTED TO BRING US A TRAY WITH FOUR DRINKS AT A TIME. AFTER NINE PM WE LEFT FEELING PRETTY GOOD AND CERTAINLY HAD OUR MONIES WORTH AND SOME. FOND MEMORIES OF FLORIDA AND SPRING BREAK ON THE BEACH.
REGARDS, STAN

Doc Vernon
13th March 2013, 09:16 PM
A boat is double banked when men seated on the same thwart pull two oars, one opposite the other.

Cheers

john gill
13th March 2013, 09:17 PM
Don't suppose you've still got that flyer Stan.

Robert T. Bush
13th March 2013, 11:09 PM
As Roger recalls the barges on the continent were often lashed together and the outer ones used their screws very effectively. I imagine they still do.

Would love to take a trip up the Rhine on one. Somehow the Intra Coastal canal in Texas does not appeal.