PDA

View Full Version : CARNIVAL TRIUMPH DISABLED BY FIRE



Tony Wilding
12th February 2013, 08:12 PM
ITS HAPPENED AGAIN, CARNIVAL TRIUMPH DISABLED AND DRIFTING AFTER A ENGINE ROOM FIRE, 4200 ON BOARD, NO POWER , NO TOILETS, TUGS ON THE WAY . FIRE WAS EXTINGUISHED . CONDITIONS BAD ON BOARD.

Don Rafferty
12th February 2013, 08:21 PM
Fire-damaged Carnival ship stuck at sea another day (http://www.usatoday.com/story/travel/cruises/2013/02/11/carnival-cruise-ship-fire/1910573/)

happy daze john in oz
13th February 2013, 06:04 AM
From information I have there have been more incidents of thes nature with Carnival lines than any other. Makes you wonder what is going on.

Tony Wilding
13th February 2013, 07:50 AM
IT SEEMS ENGINE ROOM FIRES ARE VERY PREVALENT ON CRUISE SHIPS, COSTA ALLEGRA WAS SCRAPPED FOR THAT REASON, , IMAGINE 4200 ON BOARD AND NO WORKING TOILETS, THATS A HEALTH HAZARD, IN HOT WEATHER, YUK. ! IT WONT BE LONG BEFOR A FIRE HAPPENS THAT CANT BE EXTINGUISHED, LETS SEE HOW THERE EVACUATION PLANS WORK THEN.

Doc Vernon
13th February 2013, 09:05 AM
Well i sincerly hope that this doesnt keep happening as My dear Daughter,her Hubby and the one Child of 12 Years old are going on the Carnival Prince in September ,sail out of Sydney on the 6th Sept 2013
9 Nights cruise around New Caladonia!
They are so looking forward to it,as its the first time that any of them have been on a Large Cruise Liner!
They got a lovely Balcony Cabin for the Two adults and another Cabin for the Boy!
8F Deck,so looks a nice one!?/
John Strange?? Comments on this Cabin please!
Cheers

And the Wife is off as well in September 4th,going to Paris,Frankfurt,London and then back!
Arrives back 28th Sept!

Me, well all alone Boo Hoo!! haha!

happy daze john in oz
14th February 2013, 01:52 AM
Well Vernon my friend. As they are going to New Caledonia at that time of the year a balcony cabin will be good, weather should be fine but not too hot. One problem with many balcony cabins they tend to be a bit smaller than the nprmal ocean view ones. It all depends on how much time you spend in your cabin and what you like to do. Balcomies not so good on NZ run as there can be a lot of cold days at sea with salt spray coming up. Inboard cabins are fine if you like living like a mushroom, kept in the dark. But for many it is fine as it is just somewhere to sleep, problem is you never know when the sun is up. But having done four runs around thta area I am sure they will have a great time.

happy daze john in oz
14th February 2013, 01:56 AM
IT SEEMS ENGINE ROOM FIRES ARE VERY PREVALENT ON CRUISE SHIPS, COSTA ALLEGRA WAS SCRAPPED FOR THAT REASON, , IMAGINE 4200 ON BOARD AND NO WORKING TOILETS, THATS A HEALTH HAZARD, IN HOT WEATHER, YUK. ! IT WONT BE LONG BEFOR A FIRE HAPPENS THAT CANT BE EXTINGUISHED, LETS SEE HOW THERE EVACUATION PLANS WORK THEN.

I somtimes wonder why as the main engine is only a generator supplying electricity for the propulsion engines and all ships power. I heard on news today that the bloods on board are being supplied with plastic bags to replace the toilets!!!!!!!!!!!! What a load of crap, what do you do with a plastic bag?

Doc Vernon
14th February 2013, 02:30 AM
Hi John (with lots of Cruise experience)
Thanks for the Post mate,yes i hope all be be well,and i am sure they will enjoy the trip!
The older Son has just been on one as well,think he gets back Today?
This is all down to Daddy haha! (me that is teling them of the lovely Sea and Ships)
So this is the Cabin that my Daughter will have!
If its bit cool John,they can just keep the Balcony Door shut! ??
I do see that the Cabin is smaller than the others,but she and Hubby will be on Deck etc most of the time!
Cheers

12017

Neville Roberts
14th February 2013, 02:48 PM
thats agreat looking cabin Vern, me and the missus just got back of a short one to the Bahamas in a similar cabin plenty of room even for a long trip as most of the time its just changing clothes .I wonder when a repositioning cruise ship will get stuck in the middle of an ocean with no power .its only a matter of time .:cool:

alf corbyn
14th February 2013, 03:48 PM
now come on mr strange, everyone knows you keep it till you get back to port then take it home and put it on your rhubarb.

Kevin Mercer
14th February 2013, 04:56 PM
Tony,
How do these fires get started ? I worked on turbine vessels for twelve happy years and never saw a fire . Is it the plant or poor maintenance ? I once argued against automated engine rooms in the old days and said you can't improve on human sight and hearing down below. A computer only detects a fire when it has started but a vigilant watchkeeper can spot the possibility beforehand. Typical is diesel fuel getting onto hot manifolds.
As far as cabins is concerned we had a balcony cabin on a Holland America ship, the Noordam, and it was great. It was in the Med so we spent all our time on the balcony especially arriving and departing, watching the pilots come and go etc. It would be easier to evacuate in case of trouble too!
Kevin

happy daze john in oz
15th February 2013, 05:29 AM
But there have been fires at sea ever since engines were invented. Cape Town Castle, Windsor Castle are two I know of, and at the time the Windsor was in Durban. There have no doubt been many others and the cause in many cases is something simple. The problem with modern cruise ships is thta there is no back up system. The main engine is nothing more than a generator to generate electricity for all aspecst of the ship including propulsion. I believe some of the newer ships such as QE3 do have back up systems. Many of the cruise shps out there were built in Italy and are reaching some 20 years or more of age. Some have during that time had multiple owners. All P&O cruise ships regularly sailing from Oz fall into this catergory.

Des Taff Jenkins
15th February 2013, 05:46 AM
Hi All.
Iv'e just read in the news paper that Carnival Cruise's have announced that the Triumph would no longer be cruising.
Cheers Des
12022

j.sabourn
15th February 2013, 07:50 AM
On joining one of these ships must be one of the first jobs to see that the 2 Red Not Under Command lamps were oiled and ready to go. Would keep the old lamp trimmer fully employed. the number of breakdowns must point to some salient defect somewhere. Or maybe a number of different defects. Should imagine crews have been told not to talk about. Cheers John Sabourn

j.sabourn
15th February 2013, 08:04 AM
Scavenge fires and the likes were quite common on some types of Doxford engine and was on one ship was nearly a daily occurence at one time. Quickest way to put out was by slowing ship down and slowing feed to engine. The Engineers on this site may not agree with this, but this is what I was told years ago by an engineer. I agree with the post about unmanned engine rooms, I never liked, and will always believe a person on a fire watch is the better choice of the two, or ideally have both a watchkeeper as well as all the computers, however this defeats the whole purpose, which of course is money. If some people had their way there would be no one on Bridge either, just a watchkeeping robot. Maybe the days of Flash Gordon will soon be here. Cheers John Sabourn

j.sabourn
3rd March 2013, 03:45 AM
When I see calamitys such as discussed about over flowing toilets etc. I look at these vessels try and estimate the number of passengers and crew say on average 8000 total, if use the toilet facilities 3 times a day, they must have sewage tanks large enough to accomodate this amount of waste, I visualise them as a Wedding cake floating on a huge pool of waste. They must nowadys carry special persons to maintain the machinery and chemicals for break up before discharge into the sea. Anyone know if they carry what can only be described as sewage engineers. Cheers John Sabourn

Tony Wilding
3rd March 2013, 04:52 AM
i only ever sailed on one ship with a sewage plant, thv patricia, seem to remember the second engineer looked after it, the carnival triumph must have a massive sewage plant, would think a engineer must be responsible, with help.

j.sabourn
3rd March 2013, 05:56 AM
Used to call them topaz on Indian crew ships. The modern technology alone that must go into this plant however would probably be above the old topaz wallahs head. Cheers John Sabourn

Captain Kong
3rd March 2013, 08:36 AM
The newer cruise ships do have a Sewage plant, similar to shoreside, all the waste goes through it, the solids are taken out treated and dried and packed and then unloaded onto special lorries in port and disposed of, the fluids are treated and turned into fresh water which is used for washing down etc, but not for drinking.
That is what I have been told on my last trip which ended with a VNC stamped in my passport.
Brian.
.
PS. When I was in Hawaii on the TV news one channel was on the Triumph 24 hours a day, interesting.
They were speaking to several passengers by phone from the helicopters with photography via the Mobiles. of the interior.
From what I heard the whole behavior of the Passengers was disgusting.
A boat went alongside and delivered boxes of fresh food, and sandwiches etc. A passenger said some passengers were grabbing 20 times the amount they were supposed to have, stuffing their shirts with as much food as they could stuff in. Alley ways ankle deep in urine and crap, they were doing it every where.
behaving like savages.
To me an organised ship would be , if no toilets, use one swimming pool for the ladies and one for the men. with the necessary boards across to sit on, all the urine and crap contained in one place, then it would be easy to discharge later and clean. The food could be distributed by cabin Number only instead of the free for all as happened, many people went hungry because of the big fat animals grabbing it all.
It was fascinating watching human behavior at its worst. Big Fat Yanks scoffing everything and then crapping and urinating everywhere. It was shown 24 hours a day for over two days.
I do not know what the Officers were doing obviously not a lot, On Carnival they are usually Italian, say no more. Some passengers said the philipino crew were excellent trying to help but with no back up. Their conditions were worse, as the urine and crap filtered down into their accommodation and they had no ports for fresh air.
Brian

j.sabourn
3rd March 2013, 09:26 AM
Brian when the so and so hits the fan, thats when one can get a great many surprises about self survival and the way you would never think people can react. From those hiding away from what they think they cant face, to those who want to do all the shouting and making themselves heard above others. I watch some of these so called survivors after certain disasters and can visualize how they reacted during life threatening circumstances, you will probably find that those who do all the shouting afterwards on what happened and what they did, are talking through compulsion to clear their own consciences and what they did, they have no hesitation in pointing fingers at others never beleiving themselves to be part of a worsening situation. I sailed with an ex matelot who was on a warship on the Malta convoys, his ship was sunk but a number of boats got away, which were soon full to capacity, he told me that survivors in the water were being struck on the head with the blades of the oars as weapons to prevent the overcrowding of boats. This was done by a few panic ridden people. Whereas that is what the grablines on the sides of the old type boat is exactly for what they were designed, probably a lot of unneccessary deaths. Unfortuanetly the not so recent now Costa Concordia master was more than likely one of the panic type and self survival ones, the first person who should definetely be the one who shouldnt have been. I have been on vessels with sewage tanks and also incinerators, however never one with the capacity that those vessels carrying 8000 souls , the size of which I wouldnt have a clue. I therefore thought it may by now be a so called specialists job. Thanks for the info. Cheers John Sabourn.

robpage
3rd March 2013, 09:36 AM
Whenever you get these Cruise ships on fire the electrical systems seem so fragile , this one according to US Coastguard was caused by a fuel leak . If these are low headroom engine rooms , like the old Ro-Ro ferries it will make the fire quick to spread and hard to fight . I just wonder how many of these crewmen are fire fighting trained , with Sealink despite its British Rail Heritage , I think a good percentage of the guys had fire fighting and first aid training , it admittedly passed away a few quiet days in winter when there wa sa reduced service , but it is good to know the people around you have some idea what to do . When these things go out of power , I also cannot understand why the sewage plant cannot connect to the emergency generator . There must be overboard pumps , vacuum pumps and water pumps that could be changed to be dual supplied in emergencies . Maybe , like Mr Ismay , the owners don't think that the circumstances will arise

j.sabourn
3rd March 2013, 10:18 AM
Rob, I was mate on an ore carrier and had a flooded hold I couldnt pump out. We either didnt have a salvage pump or it was in pieces cant remember now. My mate the 3rd. Engineer said no problem I'll get it out for you. In the early hours of the morning he disconnected a small mega fresh water pump from in the Engine Room rigged up a salvage pump and had the hold dry in 5 hours, so could then clear all the strums etc. If same thing happened in my latter days at sea we would probably have been blowing for shore help. The old days of ships as self sufficient worlds on their own were rapidly disappearing when I retired. I know from other experiences that good engineers were worth there weight in gold, both to the shipowner and the ship. As regards fire fighting most seamen were taught how to contain a fire, however if in port the first thing after pushing the alarm button would be to call the fire brigade as they have the expertise and tools more so than what we did. Regards John Sabourn

Keith Tindell
3rd March 2013, 11:13 AM
I was on the Mc Andrews Palacio in early 62, she was a fairly new ship then, and the first one that i had come across with the modern tanks that cleaned the waste, we had to only use the dhobi powder they sold on board, otherwise it killed the bacteria in the tanks, no idea now of what the system was called, but was one of the few ships you were able to use the ships toilets in London docks. As to fire fighting in those days,bit of a joke, all we had was the smoke hoods, with the metal label attached, cannot remember the exact signals, 2 pulls more air etc. Thankfully i never had to use them in anger. Did anyone have to use them in a fire? KT

Keith at Tregenna
13th April 2013, 11:21 PM
Carnival says policy is to ‘honor maritime tradition that holds that the duty to render assistance at sea to those in need is a universal obligation of the entire maritime community.’

Ungrateful' Carnival REFUSES to reimburse taxpayers nearly $800K for rescuing of disabled ship after 'cruise from Hell'

Carnival Corp cited maritime tradition that everyone are expected to help vessels in trouble without expecting to get paid

Read more: 'Ungrateful' Carnival REFUSES to reimburse taxpayers nearly $800K for rescuing of disabled ship after 'cruise from Hell' | Mail Online (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2308454/Ungrateful-Carnival-REFUSES-reimburse-taxpayers-nearly-800K-rescuing-disabled-ship-cruise-Hell.html#ixzz2QO8OySN5)