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happy daze john in oz
26th August 2012, 06:38 AM
Had my 8 year old Land Rover serviced Thursday and the front braks had to be done. New pads and disc as they tell me with the modern car discs can no longer be machined. The mechanic was amazed that the original battery is still on there and in good condition particularly as the engine is diesel. New tyres but the old set did 115,000 kilometers, about 72,000 miles. Is this good going, or have I just been lucky?

John Pruden
26th August 2012, 06:57 AM
JOHN until a couple of months ago i drove an Audi i always had one bullet proof that's what the fitters call them nearly 200.000 miles on it full service history 17 years old then i got this new thing Nissan qashqai+2 not a patch on the old Audi this has got to many gadgets i still haven't used most of them full glass roof with the summer sun its like sitting in a greenhouse until i found the air con?jp

Les Woodard
26th August 2012, 07:05 AM
Is it a TD5 disco John? My son has a series one disco V8 and would not get rid of it for anything. Not over fussed on diesels myself. If it is a TD5 then would be looking at trading it in as soon as possible before you are up for big bickies for electrics. As for changing discs they are quiet easy to do and they have the minimum sizes stamped on the edge of them so you can measure them yourself to see if there is any wear.

Captain Kong
26th August 2012, 08:46 AM
My best ever car was a VOLVO ESTATE 575, Automatic, I did 260,000 then the oil and radiator bust and got mixed up and I had to be towed to a garage. It was tired and then died. until then exceedingly comfortable, reliable and fantastic.
I had it for 14 years before it died, Very sad.
My car now is a KIA Carens, had it for 7 years, not the best car on the road but is very reliable.The problem with cars today is Technology which bangs up the price of Servicing.

.
My first car was a Morris 14, 1937. with Big brass headlamps on. I bought it in 1957 just paid off the Dunedin Star.I was in the alehouse and a fella shouted, " Who wants to buy a car" `Me` , I heard myself shout, `How much?`
10. `I only have 7, ` That will do, he said. `its outside, here is the Log book, its yours.`
Next day I cleaned it out inside, it was like dust bin, I found Two shilling piece under the back seat , so it cost me
6.18 shillings.
Those cars were so easy to service, I think most people in those days Serviced their own cars. Change the plugs change the oil tighten the brakes with a spanner. done.
The cars in those days had no heaters, no electric windows or indicators, Turning right you wind down the window stick your hand out and gave the relevent signal. There was nothing to go wrong with them.
Not good on a freezing night when the winscreen freezes up on the inside.
The night before I sailed on the Adelaide Star in April 1957 I went to town and got bevied, I must have come home in a taxi, the car was somewhere in town , but I had a train to catch to get to Liverpool to sail. I never saw the car again, I searched every where when I came home Five months later.
Memories of happy motoring, The Insurance was 5 a year, petrol four shillings a Gallon, not a litre.
Cheers
Brian.

Keith Tindell
26th August 2012, 10:00 AM
Ah those memories of early cars, bloody thing wont start, take the distributor cap off, pop it in the oven for a couple of minutes, dash outside, reconnect it, and fingers crossed it might start. Vacumn windscreen wipers, that went slower and slower as you went up hill, and having reached the top of the hill, they thrashed their selves to bits going down. the saving grace mostly was they had something that no cars have today, a bloody starting handle. Motoring sure was an adventure!!!! KT

alf corbyn
26th August 2012, 10:23 AM
i bought a 1934 riley kestrel for a 5.00. knock on racing wheels pre-select gear box. the battery was encased in a wooden box and was about 2feet long in the bottom of the boot. the lid of the boot had a complete set of tools including a grease gun all in a fitted section inside the lid. i had it for about three years then sold it for a fiver to a scrapyard. i was working in a garage at the time and the day after i sold it , a bloke came to fill up with an exact same model in showroom condition.when i told him i had just sold one he said take me there and if its still there i'll give you 300 just for showing me, but it had already gone. i loved the old cars

Lou Barron
26th August 2012, 11:25 PM
I never thought that i would have a Jap car but after a Holden then a ford falcon i have had a Toyota Corolla for a few years my last car that i have now is also a Toyota Corolla with all the whistle and bells it is a bit on the small size but it is the best car that i have had

Les Woodard
26th August 2012, 11:55 PM
How many of you still remember the rule of not gripping the starting handle by wrapping your thumb around it LOL. Only ever do it once if it backfires. I often think about how times have changed with cars. The bodies would be rust prone and the motors would be bullet proof and now it is the other way round. Not much metal in the bodywork today to rust but the motors are so finely tuned that there is no tolerance left and they are now a throw away item on the car. Now if you where to have the old mechanics installed into a modern car it should last you for your life time in my view. About the only extra I like on the new ones is the air conditioning other than that all the rest is just to force the bloody price up and make it impossible to work on.

Tony Wilding
27th August 2012, 12:24 AM
The Achilles Heel of all modern cars is all the Electronics, thats what goes wrong, costs a fortune to fix, on specialised diagnostic computers, everything has to be renewed not repaired, the worst idea is a rubber cam belt, goodbye engineif it breaks, my son is a car enthuasist, he rebuilds them, from mechanics to bodywork, has a 20 year old mini, totally rebuilt, a opel manta sports coupe, and a austin 1300 mint condition, just bought a triumph dolomite for 300 one owner from new allways garaged thats about 17 years old, runs and looks perfect, all are easy to repair, no electronics, has an old van for work, i had a vauxhall vectra 1.8 a lovely car, roomy, comfortable, quite good on fuel, but could not keep with replacing electronic parts, ifone went wrong it shut the engine down. last car is an old vauxhall corsa, small but utterly relible, has a 1500 cc Japanese Turbo Diesel, no electronics, its fast,50MPG At least. . done 140,000 miles never let me down. simplicity is efficiency.























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Tony Morcom
27th August 2012, 12:45 AM
Have to agree. It shows how tightly integrated these cars are today: When we got our Nissan Qashqai I took it back to get the cigar lighter changed to a permanent positive feed so that I could leave my mobile on charge. They had to phone the factory only to be told it can't be done as every single part of the electrics runs through the onboard computer. There are some benefits to this mind you: you can't get a flat battery by leaving the lights on as they are all automatically shut down 20 seconds after you lock the car. I also like the automatic hands free. I only have to get in the car with my phone in my pocket and as soon as i start the engine it automatically pairs up my phone (and my wife's) so that it can be used hands free via a switch on the steering wheel.

happy daze john in oz
27th August 2012, 06:38 AM
Is it a TD5 disco John? My son has a series one disco V8 and would not get rid of it for anything. Not over fussed on diesels myself. If it is a TD5 then would be looking at trading it in as soon as possible before you are up for big bickies for electrics. As for changing discs they are quiet easy to do and they have the minimum sizes stamped on the edge of them so you can measure them yourself to see if there is any wear.

Yes Les TD5 second one I have had, runs so well with no troubles. Did you know that 75% of all the land rovers ever built are still on the road somewhere in the world. Here in the Melbourne dealership where I go they have of the first two sent out here in 1948 for testing in the Simpson desert. In UK there is a series one diesel from 1956 still on the road with over half a million miles on the clock and never had the head off. That vehicle was voted best ever car by European motoring jounalists a few years back.

John Arton
27th August 2012, 07:08 AM
My mate and i had a nice little earner going in the late 60's early 70's where we would buy ex. army land rovers when the army regiments sold them off. Brought them for a song, resprayed them and then flogged them on at a tidy profit.
Being ex. army they were well maintained and mileage was high but all in good working order. Army regiments used to hold regular auctions at their barracks where you could pick up Land Rovers, Trucks, and all sorts of stuff that they thought was past its use by date. Eventually the top brass got into the act and centralised it all through one auction place for all regiments. It used to be advertised in the local and national papers but have not seen one for years now so don't know if it still goes on.
rgds
JA

Louis the Amigo
27th August 2012, 04:54 PM
Hi Shipmates, my brother in law owned a car show room and garage for over 28 years, so I have driven a few and owned some, my favorite car was a old toyota 1000 one of his px jobs cost me a round of Drinks down the car traders strip club in City road cardiff lunch time ,{ Long gone} The car {Tommy} my baby son called it that , was a joke held together by red paint, like one or two ships I was on? but it never let me down the engine and gear box was sound, it was a non drinker of petrol. I used to forget when to put some in the fuel thingy was allways green, it had sprung seats and you could feel every lump ,bump , and match stick , on the road the ride was like a old time bogey made out of old pram wheels,,I have owned some nice cars from british leyland to B.M.W. But my Px job done me great service for 7 years with no cost !!!! no trouble with it except a light blub free down the junk yard they bought the car for spare parts in the end, failed the M.O.T. on allmost the full list, The parts are now in other cars now very few of them on the road very rare? cars today are too clever, and tell you when to fix them.and garages charge a fortune to put the parts in today .

Ivan Cloherty
27th August 2012, 05:46 PM
My mate and i had a nice little earner going in the late 60's early 70's where we would buy ex. army land rovers when the army regiments sold them off. Brought them for a song, resprayed them and then flogged them on at a tidy profit.
Being ex. army they were well maintained and mileage was high but all in good working order. Army regiments used to hold regular auctions at their barracks where you could pick up Land Rovers, Trucks, and all sorts of stuff that they thought was past its use by date. Eventually the top brass got into the act and centralised it all through one auction place for all regiments. It used to be advertised in the local and national papers but have not seen one for years now so don't know if it still goes on.
rgds
JA

Still goes on John, the authorised agents advertise in two magazines PLANT WORLD (nothing to do with gardening) and RESALE WEEKLY, the two bibles for those buying and selling machinery, including some maritime items, such as grabs and winches etc

Kenneth Kenny
27th August 2012, 05:52 PM
My car has been in the Show Room for many years,waiting for the price to drop,nearest I got to a car the wife lived in Redcar Street,Anfield two sons have got cars the son that lives in Southampton ,his a driving Instructor,taught him every thing.R634898.Ken.

Les Woodard
27th August 2012, 11:28 PM
Always had two cars and still have them. Both are called knack and still function well. Just goes to show what great British workmanship will do.

robpage
29th August 2012, 10:15 AM
My mate and i had a nice little earner going in the late 60's early 70's where we would buy ex. army land rovers when the army regiments sold them off. Brought them for a song, resprayed them and then flogged them on at a tidy profit.
Being ex. army they were well maintained and mileage was high but all in good working order. Army regiments used to hold regular auctions at their barracks where you could pick up Land Rovers, Trucks, and all sorts of stuff that they thought was past its use by date. Eventually the top brass got into the act and centralised it all through one auction place for all regiments. It used to be advertised in the local and national papers but have not seen one for years now so don't know if it still goes on.
rgds
JAThey used to be sold at auction at Ruddington Ordnance Storage and Disposal depot in Nottinghamshire , you can find some history on line , I would think ?? it closed at least twenty years ago , now I beleive everything is done by tenders in little brown envelopes

John Pruden
29th August 2012, 02:32 PM
john the police often have auctions selling of there old cars my mate bought one every time he went to the airport. lorries would move out of the way for him{he left the number on the top} till he got a pull??JP

Keith at Tregenna
29th August 2012, 05:01 PM
An elderly man is stopped by the police around 2 a.m.
and is asked where he is going at this time of night.
The man replies, "I am on my way to a lecture about
alcohol abuse and the effects it has on the human body,
as well as smoking and staying out late."

The officer then asks, "Really?

Who is giving that lecture at this time of night?"

The man replies, "That would be my wife."

K.

Keith at Tregenna
29th August 2012, 05:05 PM
HORN !

Just a men and motors thing:

10702

K.