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E.Martin
14th August 2012, 01:06 PM
Talking to a friend yesterday I said "He copped a spar"
Another one "Who ruffled his sails".
I think both of them mean the same.
Any Ideas?

Roger Dyer
15th August 2012, 11:52 AM
Hi Mr. Martin (Sorry for the formality, but do not know your first name),

Cannot help you with the saying " He copped a spar", but I think you will find that the term
"Who ruffled his sails?" was a nautical version of " Who ruffled his feathers?" and simply
meant " Who upset him?". Another term I always thought very descriptive was '' He was blowing for tugs" generally applied to a seaman or other person who was hopelessly drunk and staggering along. The comparison being a ship in an unfamiliar port urgently tooting it's whistle/horn seeking the assistance of tugs.

....... regards, Roger

happy daze john in oz
15th August 2012, 12:16 PM
Copped a spar. Could refer to a sailor up in the rigging furling sails when the ship maybe rolled and the guy was hit by the spar? Just a thought, not sure as to the actual meaning.

Jim Brady
15th August 2012, 01:47 PM
Roger,2# If someone in Liverpool was said to be blowing for tugs it meant he was skint and hanging around for some one to buy him his ale.Maybe he was tooting his whistle as he was in distress being skint!!!!!
Regards.
Jim.B.

Captain Kong
15th August 2012, 02:09 PM
Or `I am `Down by the head` with something. means you have too much of what ever it is.

Louis the Amigo
15th August 2012, 06:39 PM
Hi shipmates we have many sea sayings and meanings from many parts of the world seafarer's had they own way of talking mixed with native and local accents

Keith Tindell
15th August 2012, 07:01 PM
The one i use even today, he was schooner rigged, ie short of something KT

Kenneth Kenny
15th August 2012, 10:59 PM
Hi jim,on the docks blowing for tugs ,ment out of breath,any one hanging around for a drink was a bum,came a cross alot of them in life.Mine sweeper was somebody who drank your pint,as soon as you turned your head the other way,had one in the in the Elm House on derby road by the docks.On the docks on your dinner hour if you went for a pint and there was five in the company,one of them was the Harvey show jumper always got a clear round,in other words never bought a pint,but drank four they had one on for Harrisons well known Dick first name.Ken.

j.sabourn
15th August 2012, 11:58 PM
Ref. to the opposite sex. A forced draught job or built like a shore bosun, with ref to size. and he walks with a western ocean roll. ref.to a seamans walking. John Sabourn

Des Taff Jenkins
16th August 2012, 05:15 AM
HiAll.
I'm glad this has come up, yesterday after a wonderfull dinner I said to my wife" I could go around the Buoy's on that dinner" I hadn't said that for years but it just come out after a great meal
Cheers Des :th_thth5952deef: :rolleyes::rolleyes:

happy daze john in oz
16th August 2012, 05:26 AM
Or `I am `Down by the head` with something. means you have too much of what ever it is.

On many a UCL vessel it may well have had a different meaning, particularly by catering crew.

happy daze john in oz
16th August 2012, 05:40 AM
HiAll.
I'm glad this has come up, yesterday after a wonderfull dinner I said to my wife" I could go around the Buoy's on that dinner" I hadn't said that for years but it just come out after a great meal
Cheers Des :th_thth5952deef: :rolleyes::rolleyes:

A priest making such a statement could well find himself in trouble.

Gulliver
16th August 2012, 06:42 AM
A priest making such a statement could well find himself in trouble.

Stop that,John! .....or I'll bring out that spray again!

10546

john sutton
16th August 2012, 06:42 AM
I heard of a scouser who used to leave his teeth in his pint when he went for a slash
john sutton

John Arton
16th August 2012, 07:33 AM
regularly in use amongst us all
pump bilges...going for a slash
rgds
JA

john gill
16th August 2012, 06:37 PM
doing cruising from the Everglades with Cunard in the 60's, there was a pantryman who was very generously endowed and who was always wary whilst supping in company in the pig, of minesweeping. His strategy when needing to visit the toilet was to dip his oversized member into his pint and give it a little swirl. Needless to say his ale remained untouched until his return.
gilly

Glyn Jones
16th August 2012, 08:05 PM
I've heard of this happening before, only that the rest of the crew who he was drinking with dipped their wicks in the pint before he returned and said nothing!!!

Tony Morcom
16th August 2012, 09:37 PM
Sad thing is I can just imagine that happening on-board a lot of ships:rolleyes:

Kenneth Kenny
16th August 2012, 10:04 PM
Drank in the Coranation in Bootle off Linacre Lane in the 60s there were some drunks would wait until you went the toilet,and finish your pint off,anyway one of drinkers said I will take care of my piant the put a beer mat on top of the piant and wrote on I have spit in this,when he came back some body had wrote on the beer mat so have I.It was a great pub always full,and great people.One night going on nights work on the docks,went in the Blue House next to Everton's Ground,went in for pint of Guinness said this bloke watch my pint,going for a billy riddle,came back pint and bloke gone,looked in the palour there he was sitting in the corner drinking it said what's this,he said watch this go down drinking it,showed him my Docker's Hook tucked in my belt your last drink looked and said sorry mate only joke buy you pint back went the bar with him and made him get me pint and aglass of Guinness he was shaken up. Went and got my bus to work.Next night went in for a pint same bloke in there said get you pint,got me pint Guinness,had that did not buy him one back.True Story.Ken.

John Pruden
16th August 2012, 10:04 PM
Jim blowing for tugs was also used for anyone with a bad chest my dad always used it he was always out of breath.jp

Roger Dyer
17th August 2012, 02:08 AM
Hi Shipmates,

At the risk of censure, I post the following in an attempt to be humourous and hope the members (especially the ladies) will forgive me if I seem indelicate.......but I wonder how many of you, particularly former deck-crowd, recall the term which, in part, mentioned " being two-blocks....." when applied to describe the absolute limit attainable whilst demonstrating vigorous ardour during the act of copulation. It was, of course, in reference to the position of the two blocks of a purchase when raised to a point where they close together and no further lift is acheivable. As a young seaman I always thought the description most apt and humourous ( still do), which probably accounts for my lack of refinement.

..............somewhat sheepishly,Roger

happy daze john in oz
17th August 2012, 06:23 AM
Heard today that in the States they have almost perfected a male contraception pill. This will prevent conception but will have no effect on the capabilities of the middle stump to perform. Pity it was not found a few years ago, my mate wasa caught out LBW and it cost him a fortune in payments.

happy daze john in oz
17th August 2012, 06:25 AM
Hi Shipmates,

), which probably accounts for my lack of refinement.


..............somewhat sheepishly,Roger

Roger lack of refinement, not you, you are an upstanding fellow. Well i hope so!

Keith Tindell
17th August 2012, 08:39 AM
I tink we must have all gone through the following scenario , as a first tripper spewing violently over the rail with seasickness, and being given the old sailors advice, * if you see a little red ring hanging out of your mouth, poke it back its your a*****le, * Remember it well, not very helpful KT

alf corbyn
17th August 2012, 10:02 AM
one i used to ue a lot. going to point percy at the porcelain. also he was in a right two and eight.

john sutton
17th August 2012, 10:03 AM
there is a book titled ship to shore which is a dictionaty of nautical words and phrases.I have tried to upload the cover without avail after about 10 attempts(my ignorance).
it can be found by googling the title and is on sale at amazon
john sutton

john gill
17th August 2012, 10:17 AM
doing cruising from the Everglades with Cunard in the 60's, there was a pantryman who was very generously endowed and who was always wary whilst supping in company in the pig, of minesweeping. His strategy when needing to visit the toilet was to dip his oversized member into his pint and give it a little swirl. Needless to say his ale remained untouched until his return.
gilly

as a postscript to the above- brave was any man who would accompany our well hung pantryman to view the porcelain, which often gave rise to some bladder bursting agony. I also actually saw him being refused the services of the local 'ladies of the night' in Aruba after presenting his credentials on the bar.

Tony Morcom
17th August 2012, 11:18 AM
10563

john sutton
17th August 2012, 02:30 PM
still dont know how to do it.there,s about 10 copies of that floating round the system somewhere.
thanks
john sutton

Red Lead Ted
17th August 2012, 03:04 PM
Talking to a friend yesterday I said "He copped a spar"
Another one "Who ruffled his sails".
I think both of them mean the same.
Any Ideas?


When you cop for something, It usually mean,s you have recieved something you weren,t expecting. To cop a Spar { Repairing Spar Ceiling,s down a hatch and one smacking you on the head } Or recieving a smack in the face you wern,t expecting, or might have provoked by ruffling someones sail,s or annoying them. Regards all Terry. :faint:

Tony Morcom
17th August 2012, 03:14 PM
still dont know how to do it.there,s about 10 copies of that floating round the system somewhere.
thanks
john sutton

John there are step by step instructions in the Help with using this site Forum. Mind you that assumes that you have the picture on your computer in the first place:)

Captain Kong
17th August 2012, 03:16 PM
A lot of Cooks after scrubbing out in the Galley always said "Wipe down Pork Chop" anyone else hear that?
SHE uses it now when doing the `scrub out`
Brian..

Red Lead Ted
17th August 2012, 03:23 PM
Hi Shipmates,

At the risk of censure, I post the following in an attempt to be humourous and hope the members (especially the ladies) will forgive me if I seem indelicate.......but I wonder how many of you, particularly former deck-crowd, recall the term which, in part, mentioned " being two-blocks....." when applied to describe the absolute limit attainable whilst demonstrating vigorous ardour during the act of copulation. It was, of course, in reference to the position of the two blocks of a purchase when raised to a point where they close together and no further lift is acheivable. As a young seaman I always thought the description most apt and humourous ( still do), which probably accounts for my lack of refinement.

..............somewhat sheepishly,Roger

Isailed with a few male steward,s who had never handled a block and tackle in there lives, But new the meaning of TWO BLOCKS UP. Terry. ;)

Dennis McGuckin
17th August 2012, 03:51 PM
A lot of Cooks after scrubbing out in the Galley always said "Wipe down Pork Chop" anyone else hear that?
SHE uses it now when doing the `scrub out`
Brian..
Yes Brian. We scrubed down the galley at least twice daily. Often three times depending on the chief cook.
Easy enough, as lots of scuppers.
On the liners the cry I remember after the last sitting was just "wipe her down' [the galley that is]
Den.

Jim Brady
17th August 2012, 06:08 PM
At the press you could hear,three times on the loop the loop two on the Lillian Gish and three on the Joe Blake!! Ex stewards would know what this was all about and can add a few more I'm sure that you guys from other departments can work out what was being asked for.
Regards.
Jim.B.

E.Martin
17th August 2012, 06:31 PM
He has got his "door down" is a saying among fishermen which means He has got a Cob on..
Blocker Man was the bosun.
Long time since I heard Round the bouys.
Few weeks ago talking to the wife I said The sunshade has been furled since we put it up,Wife said whats Furled?

Captain Kong
18th August 2012, 09:46 AM
Hows about "she was a big `forced draught job` describing a rather large lady.
Brian.

john sutton
18th August 2012, 02:27 PM
one of the most used nautical sayings was"fxxkoff you stupid barsteward"
john sutton

Keith Tindell
18th August 2012, 03:01 PM
How about, she was a panama lead red, ie rust bucket KT

Louis the Amigo
18th August 2012, 03:59 PM
Hi shipmates,, old time sailing ship trying to find port in foul weather, slate was the cargo T Windward 1874 captain david bone of the Ann Pritchard of Beaumaris Wales Night fell black night The moon not risen to set a boundary to sea and sky, no play of high light on the waste of heaving water, naught but the long inky ridges rolling out of the west That lifting giddily to crest sent us reeling into windless trough. Breakers ahead came a long shout a scream allmost, from the look out aloft both the captain and pilot sprang to the leeward rigging, Handing they eyes to shield the wind and spray. Faint as yet against the sombre monotone of the sea and sky a long line of breaking water leapt into they gaze then vanished, as the staggering barque drove into the trough, again and again, they could be no doubt breakers on a lee shore!!!! All hands No need for a call " Breakers ahead - the words that sent us racing to the yards, To out knife and whip at the gaskets that held our saving power in leash, Quickly done the great main sail blew out,thrashing furiously till steadied by tack and sheet. Then topgal ' n 'sail and spars bucking to overstrain, staysail spanker- never was canvas crowded on a ship at such a pace .We had a mighty fear in our hearts that only frenzied action could allay.

Captain Kong
18th August 2012, 04:27 PM
By Gum, Louis, when I read that I was there, hands are still shaking as I wipe the salt spray from my eyes.
Brian.

E.Martin
18th August 2012, 05:56 PM
Hows about "she was a big `forced draught job` describing a rather large lady.
Brian.

Every one to his own choice!!.

E.Martin
18th August 2012, 06:02 PM
What about a nice pair of Top ********?.

Friend of mine ex Royal Navy vet always said that he was on to a good Ping

Peter Trodden
18th August 2012, 08:05 PM
We always refered to Big girls as a Four Strap Job,meaning it would take a Four strap lifting spread to shift her. Maybe the original has been thru a Scouse mangle:confused:
One I remember hearing years ago,two men arguing and getting close to blows, an old AB stepped in saying 'Vast there,Ease to the stopper. Any Deckhands heard that one.
ttfn Peter.

Jim Brady
18th August 2012, 08:15 PM
Someone had a terrible head of hair on him and the remark would be "He's got a head on him like a Portugese Lodging House Cat" Why Portugese I dont know.
Regards.
Jim.B.

Captain Kong
18th August 2012, 08:44 PM
Or, he has a Belly like our Parish Priest. and an 4R5E like a money lender. Another scouse one.
another like Jims, A head like a lodging house Tom Cat. and Cunard Feet, cos he cunardly walk.
or, he`s gorra Gob on `im like a smacked 4R5E.
or to thump some one was, to Stick a Gob on `im.
Brian

Jim Brady
18th August 2012, 08:52 PM
A guy with a small bald head was said to have "A head on him like a Rosary Bead".
Regards.
Jim.B.

Keith at Tregenna
18th August 2012, 08:57 PM
Must say, I did skip read the thread and did not notice the following: Travelling with excess baggage, from an old RN mate on holiday with the wife and kids. His ever old fave was lumpy jumpers: to do with identyfing the female form:

K.

Jim Brady
18th August 2012, 09:09 PM
Not nautical but I was sitting in a pub a woman walked passed with a rather large backside the guy next to me commented "the last time I seen an a**e like that it was going over Beechers Brook".thats a Grand National jump for those who are not familiar with horse racing..
Regards.
Jim.B.

Duke Drennan
18th August 2012, 09:55 PM
Or "The last time I saw an ar$e like that, Sabu was hitting it with a stick".

Red Lead Ted
18th August 2012, 09:56 PM
Wanted to know asap.................. What side too are we Chief, Obvious to deck hand,s ? Regards Lads Terry. :th_thth5952deef:

Keith at Tregenna
18th August 2012, 10:16 PM
Must say, I did skip read the thread and did not notice the following: Travelling with excess baggage, from an old RN mate on holiday with the wife and kids. His ever old fave was lumpy jumpers: to do with identyfing the female form:

K.

Was it something I did not say ?

Last experience: she was a female footie referee, half way through, she blew her whistle, we changed ends and I got the wet patch:

If her daddy's rich, take her out for a meal
If her daddy's poor, just do what you feel.

LINK: Mungo Jerry - In The Summertime - YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zc9wIzi96_E)

k.

happy daze john in oz
19th August 2012, 07:19 AM
Here in Oz when we see a fine a45e we say, 'you could crack a stubby on that'. A stuby being a bottle of beer with a SCREW top.

EIFION
19th August 2012, 03:54 PM
My favourite expression was " whores , theives and first trippers " with an appropriate shake of the head to show contempt .
"blowing for tugs " ment something a little different and a lot more vulgar , the act of farting !

Roger Dyer
19th August 2012, 04:20 PM
Hi Shipmates,

How interesting that the term ' Blowing for tugs', although comparatively common amongst seaman, should have such diverse meanings depending on what part of the
country the seaman came from. It can apply to a person who is staggering drunk,
needing a drink with no money to pay for it, or suffering from acute flatulence..........
............take your pick.


...................Roger

E.Martin
19th August 2012, 05:44 PM
He or she "Need a good stiff turking too"
We all spoke a little French "Merci Blowthrough"

Chris Allman
19th August 2012, 07:16 PM
What always made me laugh was about birds, the feathered kind, no matter what they were, Seagull, Tern etc they were ' SH-TE- Hawks :D

Chris.

Red Lead Ted
19th August 2012, 07:28 PM
A guy drunk as a skunk. walking trying to hold himself against the wind or appearing to Terry. :p

Glyn Jones
19th August 2012, 07:29 PM
I have heard the "Flying Angel" referred to as the "Flying Tab Nab" and also the "Flying Sh*t Shute", unless this was just by some of the mad scousers I sailed with.

happy daze john in oz
20th August 2012, 06:19 AM
Hi Shipmates,

How interesting that the term ' Blowing for tugs', although comparatively common amongst seaman, should have such diverse meanings depending on what part of the
country the seaman came from. It can apply to a person who is staggering drunk,
needing a drink with no money to pay for it, or suffering from acute flatulence..........
............take your pick.


...................Roger

Roger, had you been with UCl or a number of other liner companies you may well have learned a different meaning to that saying.

Roger Dyer
20th August 2012, 10:13 AM
Roger, had you been with UCl or a number of other liner companies you may well have learned a different meaning to that saying.

John, mate, am I to understand that during your time with UCL while you and half the crew were working, the other half were indulging in sexual misconduct. I do hope
I put you with the right half of the crew;)


.................Roger

Capt Bill Davies
20th August 2012, 10:32 PM
Whilst being reminded of 'Starvin' as in Hank Marvin (Cockney Rhyming slang) this evening, I thought of an expression I haven't heard of in years for people with good appetites.

'He'd eat the back out of a dockers Coat'


Bill

john sutton
21st August 2012, 06:33 AM
dont know if this has been done already.
"that took the wind out of his sails"
it applies to me if somebody has already used it
john sutton

happy daze john in oz
21st August 2012, 06:58 AM
John, mate, am I to understand that during your time with UCL while you and half the crew were working, the other half were indulging in sexual misconduct. I do hope
I put you with the right half of the crew;)


.................Roger

It was reported that there was a phantom one on board one of the UCL ships who came around in the dead of night.. Never found out if it was true

Captain Kong
21st August 2012, 10:41 AM
[I]'He'd eat the back out of a dockers Coat' Bill.
.

Also I`m so hungry I could eat a Scabby Cat.
or, I`m so tired I could sleep with my head in a bucket of crap.
Brian

j.sabourn
21st August 2012, 11:23 AM
Always thought the helm order Steady as she Goes was always a bit misleading, always wanted to say... Goes where. John Sabourn

Keith Tindell
21st August 2012, 11:48 AM
The one i use today, on the rare occasion i see one is * a bottle screw biffta *, ie some one has a low slung ar**, and short legs, or the opposite, a high slung ar**, and extra long legs. KT

j.sabourn
22nd August 2012, 03:43 AM
Sitting on the ships rail, was for fools, firemen, and first trippers. John sabourn

happy daze john in oz
22nd August 2012, 05:53 AM
[I]'He'd eat the back out of a dockers Coat' Bill.
.

Also I`m so hungry I could eat a Scabby Cat.
or, I`m so tired I could sleep with my head in a bucket of crap.
Brian

Brian, I thoght you said you lived beside a bucket of crap!
As for the cat, I think your neighbours would most likely get there first.

E.Martin
11th March 2014, 10:42 AM
I have got a mouth like a Vultures Crotch,most of us have said that a few times

Keith Tindell
11th March 2014, 11:34 AM
The one i remember is *i`ve got a mouth like the bottom of a baby`s pram, all dried p*** and broken biscuits, KT

Red Lead Ted
12th March 2014, 12:53 AM
After a good tank up ashore the night before, I liked the hair of the dog saying............I have got a throat like gunga dins loin cloth know the feeling well Terry.:mymy:

gray_marian
12th March 2014, 01:25 AM
#72 Better not let the pc brigade hear that one Terry:D
Gunga Din




You may talk o' gin and beer
When you're quartered safe out 'ere,
An' you're sent to penny-fights an' Aldershot it;
But when it comes to slaughter
You will do your work on water,
An' you'll lick the bloomin' boots of 'im that's got it.
Now in Injia's sunny clime,
Where I used to spend my time
A-servin' of 'Er Majesty the Queen,
Of all them blackfaced crew
The finest man I knew
Was our regimental bhisti, Gunga Din.
He was "Din! Din! Din!
"You limpin' lump o' brick-dust, Gunga Din!
"Hi! Slippy hitherao!
"Water, get it! Panee lao
"You squidgy-nosed old idol, Gunga Din."
The uniform 'e wore
Was nothin' much before,
An' rather less than 'arf o' that be'ind,
For a piece o' twisty rag
An' a goatskin water-bag
Was all the field-equipment 'e could find.
When the sweatin' troop-train lay
In a sidin' through the day,
Where the 'eat would make your bloomin' eyebrows crawl,
We shouted " Harry By!"
Till our throats were bricky-dry,
Then we wopped 'im 'cause 'e couldn't serve us all.
It was "Din! Din! Din!
"You 'eathen, where the mischief 'ave you been?
"You put some juldee in it
"Or I'll marrow you this minute
"If you don't fill up my helmet, Gunga Din!"

'E would dot an' carry one
Till the longest day was done;
An' 'e didn't seem to know the use o' fear.
If we charged or broke or cut,
You could bet your bloomin' nut,
'E'd be waitin' fifty paces right flank rear.
With 'is mussick' on 'is back,
'E would skip with our attack,
An' watch us till the bugles made "Retire,"
An' for all 'is dirty 'ide
'E was white, clear white, inside
When 'e went to tend the wounded under fire!
It was "Din! Din! Din!"
With the bullets kickin' dust-spots on the green
When the cartridges ran out,
You could hear the front-ranks shout,
"Hi! ammunition-mules an' Gunga Din!"

I sha'n't forgit the night
When I dropped be'ind the fight
With a bullet where my belt-plate should 'a' been.
I was chokin' mad with thirst,
An' the man that spied me first
Was our good old grinnin', gruntin' Gunga Din.
'E lifted up my 'ead,
An' he plugged me where I bled, An' 'e guv me 'arf-a-pint o' water green.
It was crawlin' and it stunk,
But of all the drinks I've drunk,
I'm gratefullest to one from Gunga Din.
It was "Din! Din! Din!
"'Ere's a beggar with a bullet through 'is spleen"
"'E's chawin' up the ground,
"An' 'e's kickin' all around:
"For Gawd's sake git the water, Gunga Din!

'E carried me away
To where a dooli lay,
An' a bullet come an' drilled the beggar clean.
'E put me safe inside,
An' just before 'e died,
"I 'ope you liked your drink" sez Gunga Din.
So I'll meet 'im later on
At the place where 'e is gone
Where it's always double drill and no canteen.
'E'll be squattin' on the coals
Givin' drink to poor damned souls,
An' I'll get a swig in hell from Gunga Din!
Yes, Din! Din! Din!
You Lazarushian-leather Gunga Din!
Though I've belted you and flayed you,
By the livin' Gawd that made you,
You're a better man than I am, Gunga Din!

Red Lead Ted
12th March 2014, 01:29 AM
Marian, My misses scares me more than the p.c. brigade. I have to live with her Terry.:hidesbehindsofa:

j.sabourn
12th March 2014, 02:55 AM
Or the one (usually by a seaman who liked to work alone) Eff you Jack, I'm aboard pull up the gangway. Or I wouldnt touch her with yours. Every finger a marline spike. Hands like shovels. JS

happy daze john in oz
12th March 2014, 05:20 AM
I have got a mouth like a Vultures Crotch,most of us have said that a few times

You have me at a distinct disadvantage there sir never having myself tasted one.