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Dennis McGuckin
31st July 2012, 03:09 AM
While on my sun deck this afternoon, temp a nice 25c, and having a bevvie. I started to reminisce.
Think all of us old guys do that from time to time.
Anyway. Seams like more and more I am thinking about my times at sea.
I began to wonder why.
Then I realised that it all began when I joined this site in June 2008.
Suddenly I was back with guys who spoke the same language.
Not to mention the feeling of camaraderie that I never felt ashore.
Wonder why I never dwelt on my various shoreside jobs.
Guess because at sea it was an adventure, with travel to exotic ports [and not so exotic ports] with good mates you could rely on.
Always remember when I came ashore and went to the pub. Pulled out my fags and passed them round, just like we always did.
Also bought a round.
Next shout everyone bought their own.
That when I first discovered the difference between shoresiders and seamen.
That's me off the soap box.
Time to hit the pit.
Den.

j.sabourn
31st July 2012, 04:12 AM
Denis, most of us have noticed these differences. As youngsters we had to grow up fast, dont think any shoreworker would understand or probably accept the work and conditions we accepted as normal. I have always found it hard to converse with a person who has spent a lifetime working ashore. When they ask about seagoing life, 9 times out of 10, I give up knowing they do not understand the words or terminology of shipping, and probably would think you were shooting them a line. Best regards John Sabourn PS Is Tahsis a working port for the export of timber up there still. Was way up the creek, the one mounty used to be flown in every week, as had a very small population, with only 1 mill at my time there. Cheers John Sabourn

Keith Tindell
31st July 2012, 06:30 AM
Totally agree, i can remember the excitement when joining a ship, which was mostly dry cargo, the whole world to see. It was a different world then, not as small as it is today. I remember going round the greek islands on Ellerman boats, long before tourism got there, it was so beautiful and a mystery to me. But we have those memories, and we are very priviledged to have travelled the world in such a carefree manner. No regrets a all, regards KT

Des Taff Jenkins
31st July 2012, 06:50 AM
Hi Den.
I can't sit on my sun deck otherwise I'd freeze to death, but my wife told me yesterday that I'm a day dreamer, it's somthing I've always done, even more so now. I keep going back to ports visited ships conversations, and like you I very seldom reminise about a shore job, I think it was the closness, sharing cabins and messrooms for months sometimes years. There is a video going throgh the Suez and the Panama I play it over and over I'm there again.
Cheers Des

Les Woodard
31st July 2012, 06:51 AM
I was mainly on the colonial run and it was a experience that could never be replicated ashore. Money did not mean a thing as when first arriving would throw into tarpualin musters and like everyone else end up broke about one third around the coast but still would go ashore and others would top up the tarpualin muster of ships that had just arrived. No one seemed to care who's money it was as it was all about friendships and mates. Try to explain that to shore side workers. It was vertually like being a memeber of a very close family. Well it was with the crowds I sailed with and on top of all this it did not even matter what shipping line you where with. I do not know if other departments where like this but the deck crew's where notorious for it. Maybe that is why I do not recall many names because there where do bloody many and our brain cellls where otherwise engaged between our legs what was left of them.

I know I get into strife on site for being outspoken but you can blame it on my formulating years on Aussie/Kiwi coast. We would BS one another but would not take it of anyone else because they always seemed to believe their own BS.

To sum up where else could you end up half way around the world with not a cracker in your pocket yet end up legless and a bird on your arm at the end of the night. Only a seaman could.

happy daze john in oz
31st July 2012, 06:57 AM
There is something about those of us who went to sea that cannot be understood by shoresiders. What is was is something that each of us in our own way felt, no two alike maybe. An understanding of working together for a common aim and all willing to pull together.

Things may have been better had Den used 'Real'Rum instead of rum essence in the tab nabs, but that is for another day.

Ivan Cloherty
31st July 2012, 07:50 AM
[QUOTE=Les Woodard;97105] It was vertually like being a memeber of a very close family. Well it was with the crowds I sailed with and on top of all this it did not even matter what shipping line you where with. I do not know if other departments where like this but the deck crew's where notorious for it.

It was the "cooped up together" thing that made us what we were, we supported each other in bad weather (and the good weather made us all more amicable towards each other) and yes the deck crowd (including all topdeck) probably did have a closer bond than other departments because they were the ones closer to the elements in bad weather and had to rely on each other so much at that time if deck gear or cargo broke adrift, also having to ensure your shipmates didn't get washed overboard when working in those close quarter situations, situations in which other departments didn't get involved.

Also probably the cargo ships with a total complement of 50 -70 souls on board bonded much quicker than passenger ships which had departments much larger than the total crews of a cargo ship, it is doubtful if a close bond could be formed by 200-300 catering staff, but they had their cliches and buddies. It is difficult to remember the names of all those you sailed with, even if you were on the same ship for two years, as mostly nicknames, initials or ranks were used, Bos, chippie, lamps, leckie, sparks, etc Paddy, Taff, Scotty, chalkie, JD, IC, would be surprised if most of us knew the surnames of the shipmates we sailed with, we probably saw them on the Lifeboat Stations list but they were soon forgotten

Tony Wilding
31st July 2012, 11:58 AM
when i came ashore to work i could i not believe how different it was, the backstabbing and hard to make real mates as at sea, and i make friends easily, i live in a house converted into 3 apartments, only meet when we enter or exit, but nobody speaks, i dont have a dedicated parking space, so i try to park as close as possible, allways leave room for them, but am told not to park there even though there is ample room for them, they know i cant walk far, but dont care. personally i found the people of india much more respectful to elderly infirm people, yesterday i had to travel to london by train, then by underground to take a relative to her sister, on the return journey alone struggling with the stairs on the underground 4 people asked if i was ok or needed help, none were english.

Dennis McGuckin
31st July 2012, 04:00 PM
Hi Les. I recall many times us in catering having a tarpaulin muster.
My big memory was in the Round House after getting home from missing the ship in Santos.
Had sailed in previous times with half of the crowd in there.
They had a muster to get me on the train to Coventry.
Ended up spending it all on booze [but that's another story].
Once I joined a ship in Liverpool. Skint of course.
Was sitting in my cabin, not knowing anyone. Suddenly the door burst open and in a strong scouse accent this bloke said.
Are you coming ashore for a pint.
I replied sorry I'm skint.
With that he grabbed me by the shirt and said.I asked you if you were coming for a pint, not if you had any money.
Ever heard of that happening ashore??
Den.

Les Woodard
31st July 2012, 04:36 PM
Can just imagine that happening Den.

I know the first time I tried to get a job at the BHP Steelworks as a rigger I was knocked back and it was not for a few years before I managed to get in. Found out that it was because I was an ex seaman that I got knocked back. I seems that at that particular time nearly all the riggers where ex seaman and the company had an awful time in keeping them under control because they where so united that if the foreman said anything to any of them they could be down the pub before he could report back to the office. Yes many a story about seamen being on the beach penniless yet none of them without a roof over their head or a mate to shout them a drink.

Richard Quartermaine
1st August 2012, 01:28 PM
Thanks for these posts. I too have done much more reminiscing since joining this website and the memories come clearer to me as I do. What luck we had to be there and what extra bonus for being there in that period of time. And what luck to be able to read and send these posts.

Richard Q

Les Woodard
1st August 2012, 06:07 PM
I do know it was not until I ended up ashore that I found this strange object that I had to carry around with me all the time. Do not know how many I lost before I realised that you have to remember to put it on a ring with many others. It is called a "key". I have been trying to recall if I ever had one on board and if I did then dementia is setting in.

Tony Morcom
2nd August 2012, 12:24 AM
The only time I ever remember anything being physically locked up was going through Suez. I don't really remember it being an issue but its an interesting thought Les.

Roger Dyer
2nd August 2012, 03:16 AM
As Tony has already said, Les, you raise an interesting point. Apart from the bond locker or food store, when the vessel was at sea there was little use for a key. As seamen we enjoyed the benefits of an inherent trust in one another and a respect for the property of other crew members. This feeling of trust was such that a seaman locking his cabin door whilst at sea might be regarded with suspicion. Oh! what a different world we lived in.


.....Roger

happy daze john in oz
2nd August 2012, 06:12 AM
Cannot recall ever having a key apart from the time as officers steward. All the officers used to lock their cabins when away on watch, obviously a distrusting lot. Even the senior second engineer and 2nd mate did so, funny lot. But do recall pulling into a Chinese port for a couple of days and we had to put away anything Western such as girly phtos or calenders. guards on all gangways and no one ashore.

Neil Morton
2nd August 2012, 07:07 AM
All of these posts ring many bells. To this very day all my close friends are men I went to sea with. They are scattered around the Commonwealth and the UK. Most of them go back 50 years or more. I have made new friends here on this forum, many I have never met, however I know they are, to use a tired old axiom, " tarred with the same brush", as are all of us. Life in retirement and, dare I say old age, can become tiresome , irksome. and bloody boring.At those times I turn to this band of old seamen who speak in the language of my daydreams and youth.
On the golf course that I use (public) I met a couple of ex Aussie customs men (rummagers), both ex Uk seamen, one of them a Vindi boy and at the Returned Services Club a couple of ex MN guys. We created no bond because they were not of the "happy Jack ashore" variety. If you study the respondees (if that's a word) to Den's sun deck reverie you will no doubt find men who know the true meaning of comradeship and shared good times and bad as previously described.
I was at sea for 10 short years and can number a dozen good men with whom I still have almost daily contact. I have worked ashore for 47 years and can only count two good friends made during that time. As previously stated the back stabbers and social climbers leave a very nasty taste in this old camudgeons throat.
No doubt a shrink would have a wonderful time with my head Ha Ha !:pat_head:

Ivan Cloherty
2nd August 2012, 07:22 AM
Cannot recall ever having a key apart from the time as officers steward. All the officers used to lock their cabins when away on watch, obviously a distrusting lot. Even the senior second engineer and 2nd mate did so, funny lot. But do recall pulling into a Chinese port for a couple of days and we had to put away anything Western such as girly phtos or calenders. guards on all gangways and no one ashore.

John cannot recall any officer I sailed with locking their doors when going on watch, normally they were not even closed, just put on the cabin hook which stopped them rattling to engine vibrations. Locking all doors and ports a common occurence for everyone whilst in port.

You must have sailed with some funny people, or they had had a previous bad experience.

When we were in Chinese ports in 50's and 60's we were not allowed to lock our doors whilst in port, as the Chinese Commandant stated his soldiers had full access to all parts of the ship at all times and you didn't argue with gun toting guards who had no respect for anything with a round eye.

Doc Vernon
2nd August 2012, 07:41 AM
I can only say that many of these Posts revive the memories of the past,and as all of you i too feel that way many a time!
As most know although i was not at sea for a long time like most here,it still seems to hold something really special for me,and a site such as this truly brings back all those fond days and things we all got up to!

I know for sure that come 3rd September (MN Day) i will be Flying out of of Sydney for yet another Journey i know i will never forget!

I will also be doing a lot of reminicing,in a few places such as Paris,London (have to go and see what the old quaters look like) bet i will be most surprised!

Then of course its the Meet with George and Co in Southampton,that will be a good memory recall,the old Juniper Berry, Bargate and a few other places as well! Dock Area (yes i know also changed so much,more's the pity)
Its a great pity that the old Checkpoint Cafe that was downstairs almost opposite the JB Pub has also gone,as there were many days and Nights spent there with some lovely Ladies!!

Yes Lads how time has changed so many things,and as said here there certainly isnt that old feeling that we had so many Years ago,the Buying of a Pint for a Mate,pulling out the packet of 20 Senior Service in a crowd,and not geting the packet back with any fags in it,nut who the hell cared,we are all so free and easy and Money then meant very little to us,of that i am sure!

But unfortunately no matter how long we sit and reminice (although at times it is great) those times will never be seen again!

Take care all of you,as we are a special band of Brothers here on this great site,and really i feel that i have known most of you
all my life,funny isnt it!
Cheers
the old Crock Doc!:D

Keys?? What are they haha!

Tony Morcom
2nd August 2012, 04:58 PM
..................as there were many days and Nights spent there with some lovely Ladies!!............. You never know who you might bump into on your travels Vernon ~ maybe an offspring or 2 even:cripes::banana_dance02:

Rodney Mills
2nd August 2012, 08:36 PM
Love this thread, but I'm going to get into a lot of trouble....Here goes! My father was the cheapest man I ever knew, my step-mother was even worse plus my half brother and the rest of her brood. Due to my job, at least three times a year I would visit G.B.. One, a company in Scotland shared our company name and I would perform marketing services for them. Two I would call on major Brit. companies in London that we did business with in third world countries, to sort of show our appreciation to them (dinner and drinks etc.). I would always stopover first in the Sh..h..e I was born in...Walthamstow...beats Boltonistan...Walthamstow breeds terrorists...i.e. underground bombers. Back to the story... The taxi dropped me off at the door and peeled rubber away to the safety of the West End (where as fast as I could after I completed filial responsibility, I would scurry to). The door opens.... "What did you bring us from duty free?" "A carton of cigarettes and a bottle of scotch."..."We don't drink scotch now do we? We drink brandy now"...."OK mom, I can use it...I'll take it with me back to my hotel. The duty free bag is ripped out of my hand. Now I didn't smoke, but my dad could pull a lighted cigarette out of his pocket. No way could this happen with shipmates. Not to say they were all perfect. On my first trip to sea, the Port Jackson, my cabin mate stunk. He should have been a lands man...once a week a shower, whether he needed it or not. A few days before we crossed the equator I walked into our cabin and damn near threw-up. As any good M.N.er (http://m.n.er/) knows, one does not sail into the tropics without a sprinkle can of Johnson's Baby Powder. The fan was on and aimed at him, lolling like some sweating Buddha in his bunk. I grabbed my can of Johnson's, yanked it open and threw a sprinkle at the fan...in my pissed off state I had pulled the whole top off and a pound of bum-powder hit the fan...I am not somehow thinking this is going to make a translate across the pond, but Buddha looked like the Pillsbury Dough boy, scented and snow white from head to toe....Two days later it was resolved, a couple of wingers and grown-up cooks came into the cabin, took one sniff, came back with a crew, dragged Buddha out on deck and hosed him down and scrubbed him with a deck brush and galley soap and asked him if he wanted that every day for the rest of the trip...problem solved M.N. style.

I paid for my dad and step-mom to visit us in Connecticut, I had also done the same thing for them in L.A.. I had five bedrooms,one for my wife and me, three for our three sons and a guest room...great right? Wrong! I picked them up at J.F.K in New York and they have someone with them...HER bloody brother. Which means he sleeps on a couch, we take a taxi to see the sites in N.Y.C.? With them and us it makes seven, which means two cabs everywhere, I'm paying, cabs,train to N.Y.C. , lunch, food you name it for some bum I didn't even know! What makes it worse, if you can stand me venting about non M.N. people, I'm back a few months later in the U.K., once more in Walthamstowistan and knock on the door...the bloody brother opens the door and says "Who are you?" and slams the door in my face. I knock again, the step-mom answers and says "Don't worry about Alf, he has Alzheimer's.... What did you bring us from duty free?" Shore-folk!

Cheers, Rodney

Roger Dyer
2nd August 2012, 10:00 PM
Brilliant, Rod, keep them coming old son !!!

...Roger

Stan Carter
3rd August 2012, 02:15 AM
unfortunatly i had to quit the sea in 1960 ish, and througherly missed the life and the mates. finally came to canada in 1964 by ship, the carmania, and landed in montreal. during the first couple of days got know a couple of stewards and was invited down to their mess after supper was over. hell of a lot cheaper than the upstairs bars, had great time during that week. in 2006 took a trip to Ireland with a couple of friends who go there every year. our first two nights were spent in a B&B near dundock. the second night, a saturday our hosts asked the four of us to share supper with them. during the meal and between more and more glasses of wine, the host kept leaving the table every half hour or so and was heard in the background trying to raise someone on the radio. he finally explained that he was trying to raise a ship that was due to dock the next morning. soon the conversation got around to the sea and as it turned out we both served on esso tankers and he was the harbour master and pilot for the port. after making contact, and after a few more drinks he invited me to join him the next morning. after getting the go ahead from her who has to be obeyed and our friends, it was up early and onto the pilot launch for the trip out to meet the Linda, a small cargo ship registered in veitnam and crewed by russians. up the ladder, all the the way up to the bridge wing, served coffee and watch my host and new found friend take the ship in. he took the helm all the way in. during that trip into port, my mind wondered back in time realizing it had been forty two years since i was last on a ship, what an experience, almost brought a tear to ones eye. wouldnt have missed it for anything, and the best of it was it only took about tree hours out of planned day, my wife and friends met me on the jetty.

happy daze john in oz
3rd August 2012, 05:53 AM
You must have sailed with some funny people, or they had had a previous bad experience.

With UCL there were a lot of 'odd' ones but why the officers locked up we never knew, just the way they were. Though being a liner I know a couple used to spirit female bloods up to their cabins at night.

Neil Morton
3rd August 2012, 06:34 AM
Thank you for your ticks of a approval lads. I only sailed on two ships that had multiple bunks, the Durban Castle (6) & the Southern Cross (8) all my shipmates showered regularly thanks to the man who invented salt water soap.
On the Port New Plymouth we had a galley boy who in his previous occupation had been 2nd cowman on a Midlands farm. I kid you not . He must have gotten so used to the pong in the cow shed he seldom bothered with his ablutions, He was taken care of by the two boy ratings he shared a cabin with, in much the same way as Duke described.
The only key I ever saw in the catering dept. hung on a 2nd stewards belt. No offence to any ex 2nds reading this but they were a miserly bunch. Famously miserable with the Teepol and the mutton cloth for the soujie . As a DBS on the Ruahine I was made to wash bulkheads all the way home from Auckland, as you know this takes a month, and I was made to wash my issue of mutton cloth, (by far the best for the job), until it was in tatters before begrudgingly being issued with another measly foot ( sorry 30 centimeters ), of same. All for a shilling which I don't recall actually receiving. If you feel inclined you can read all about this particular part voyage in the Short Stories section of this forum. Cheers lads Neil.

Les Woodard
4th August 2012, 07:03 AM
I still have an aversion to shut doors and if any of the kids shut their door in the house I would go of my head over it. Even when I got the house renovated outside I got them to take out all the bedroom windows and install glass sliding doors as I could not see the sense of all that lovely fresh air going to waste of a night and security wise if there iis ever an emergency in this house exits a plentiful. Maybe I am unconventional but safety and freedom should never be compromised. End result only have four windows in the house now. But if ever the baliff comes round he will have his work cut out getting me.

Ivan Cloherty
4th August 2012, 07:29 AM
Les, I do hope you live in a bungalow

Neil Morton
4th August 2012, 09:23 AM
Hi Les you forgot to mention that you live in the moderate temperature capital of OZ . Half your luck. My life wanders between the chilly south and the sweaty north. As the actress said to the nosey steward.:dream:

john sutton
5th August 2012, 08:08 AM
best ship i ever sailed on

Captain Kong
5th August 2012, 10:39 AM
Excellent story John.
Enjoyed it, brought back a few memories of the old days and the characters.
Cheers
Brian.

Red Lead Ted
6th August 2012, 11:06 PM
If our forefather,s docker,s and Seaman would have posted if they had ,had the net and a site like this 40/50/yrs ago. And can you imagine the P.M.s between them ;) I was recognised by a few of my old man,s and his brother,s {All ex seaman} friends who were Lpool docker,s then the docker,s all over the country had character and whit !!!!!!!!!!! went to work on there bike not 2 cars up there drive and there biggest fear was a hose pipe ban. I remember my old man had the bath filled with pure alcohol he would knock it out at 10 bob a bottle there was always a que at the door on a Friday, We kids had to resort to the old tin bath until it was empty. My old mam once found bottles of scotch stored in the wardrobe he and his mates were blind drunk for weeks with the profits, She had ,had enough of this and emptied it down the sink, My old man,s buddy,s off the dock nicknamed her Elliot Ness:multilaughing:. Another time she threw about 20 suite lengths out in the front garden one night after he brought them home blind drunk. The next morning all we heared was bloody hell you will get me10yrs. And corned beef !!!!!!!!!! its a wonder we all havn,t grown bloody horns over the yrs. Tinned salmon xmas day every time a china boat was in. There was one of his mates caught at the gate with a dozen womans bra,s on. He never lived it down became known as tit,s Maddock stuck with him all his life. Even today if someone brings up his name he is refered to as tit,s Maddock, Everyone knows who you are talking about :multilaughing: I can imagine a P.M. Between them what did you get for the suite length,s? Nearly got 10yrs. There will be plenty on here will remember the guy outside the Gladstone became known as the cheap jack !!! You would meet your old man coming off the dock and getting the friday fish and salt fish for Sunday morning. Docker,s nicknames for each other i remember my old man telling one of his buddy,s he was working with the spaceman !!!!!!!! Alway,s off to his Mar,s for his dinner. The port of Liverpool as did the rest of the country had character,s then. I remember being in K.G.5. in London a docker approached a seaman m8 of mine and asked anything you need scouse just let the lads know, He said i will stitch them up YEA!!! Get me a moped he asked i will meet you in the boozer tonight never gave it another thought walked into the boozer and this docker asked him will the one outside do for you :hair_raising: Happy day,s lads Regards Terry.

Tony Wilding
6th August 2012, 11:15 PM
was in a dock street Pub one evening was offered a Standard Vanguard Car for 50 quid,in those days there was allways a fiddle.

Red Lead Ted
6th August 2012, 11:18 PM
I still have an aversion to shut doors and if any of the kids shut their door in the house I would go of my head over it. Even when I got the house renovated outside I got them to take out all the bedroom windows and install glass sliding doors as I could not see the sense of all that lovely fresh air going to waste of a night and security wise if there iis ever an emergency in this house exits a plentiful. Maybe I am unconventional but safety and freedom should never be compromised. End result only have four windows in the house now. But if ever the baliff comes round he will have his work cut out getting me.
Remember as a kid when winter,s were winter,s if you didnt shut the door behind you your old man would ask ,Where you born in a field :p Terry.

Red Lead Ted
6th August 2012, 11:32 PM
I can identify with the Suez, yes another place you had to lock your door was Kingston, Usually with you the other side of it. I went ashore there on my own one night got away with it but only did it the once.:eek:

Red Lead Ted
6th August 2012, 11:40 PM
I believe if the docker,s in them day,s would not have had enough money at the end of the week for 5 woodbines without there fiddle. And a lot of the local kids were i was brought up would have gone hungry ?. One thing i can remember which is a thing of the past if your old mam was low on stores you could alway,s go next door for a feed. Remember the old saying MUCK IN LAD !!!! Happy day,s indeed Regards To, Terry. :)

Neil Morton
7th August 2012, 02:57 AM
Hiya John and Red Lead you make us all sound like drunken scoundrels: well maybe we were but our motto was work hard and play hard, and by the holy we did. Thanks for the stories, " Then let not winter's ragged hand deface in thee thy summer,ere thou be distilled." I think old Bill Shakespeare had the right of it there. The summer of our youth was often distilled in strange liquors.:grouphug:

happy daze john in oz
7th August 2012, 05:15 AM
I believe if the docker,s in them day,s would not have had enough money at the end of the week for 5 woodbines without there fiddle. And a lot of the local kids were i was brought up would have gone hungry ?. One thing i can remember which is a thing of the past if your old mam was low on stores you could alway,s go next door for a feed. Remember the old saying MUCK IN LAD !!!! Happy day,s indeed Regards To, Terry. :)

I remember hard times mate when electricty was so expensive we all sat around a candle, and when it got cold we lit it. We were so poor my mum gave me a button and told me to go next door and see if they had a shirt they could sow on it.

John Pruden
7th August 2012, 05:18 AM
you lucky john my dad had to eat polo mints and we had to sit around his tongue to get a warm:p;)jp

Red Lead Ted
7th August 2012, 01:11 PM
J,P, We would sit around the table of a day making paper chains, If there was no shilling for the gas we would all gather around the candles !!! If it got really cold we would light them, Toasted wedgies of bread on the end of a fork open fire great day,s Terry. :p

Red Lead Ted
7th August 2012, 01:36 PM
I remember hard times mate when electricty was so expensive we all sat around a candle, and when it got cold we lit it. We were so poor my mum gave me a button and told me to go next door and see if they had a shirt they could sow on it.

I alway,s remember being learnt the fine art of rubbing down a halfpenny it would pass as a shilling for the gas or lecy meter. When the guy come to empty the meter they would be given back to my mam and not counted in whatever rebate was due. No prosicutions for fiddling in them day,s. Lpool would have become a ghost town. Regards Terry. :rulez:

Dennis McGuckin
13th August 2012, 02:02 AM
Reminisce 2.
Once again this evening I was on my sun deck having a bevy and reminiscing. [may have to stop doing that]
Was thinking of the young man who is to marry my granddaughter in thirteen days time.
I mentioned him in a previous post, and was shot down, rightly so, by Capt Bill.
However.
Was wondering what he[ Cam] may be thinking of when 50 years later he has time to reminisce.
He has never really been much further than the valley.
Will he reminess about a pay hike he received in 2200, or whatever?
I have had almost 50 years of marriage with the usual ups an downs.
But without my years in the Merch, I am not sure where I would be in my 'happy times'.
Also have worked ashore with many guys that were married young. Later in life they felt they had missed something and tried to catch up. Often ending in divorce.
I sowed my wild oats while at sea, so settled down [almost] after marriage.
Not sure what would have happened if Ann Margaret walked up my drive and offered herself though!!
Was it Nelson who said.
'We lucky few, we band of brothers'
Den.

Neil Morton
13th August 2012, 03:32 AM
Dennis all though we have never met , indeed on two occasions we nearly made it, I also have these reveries, especially on days like today, when the early spring sunshine beckons me into the garden. Praise be my sons and grandsons have chosen wisely with regard to their future and I am sure will always be in work.
Whatever threats endanger their way of life will have to be dealt with by them , as indeed we did in our time . And what a time it has been :
I saw the multi engined Brabazon with propellers spinning into the dying days of air travel before the advent of jet aircraft . I remember Geraldo, Semprini, Montivani and Victor Sylvester, Billy Cotton and Ted Heath before rock and roll hit us like an atom bomb. We all recall when dungarees gave way to blue jeans. No doubt most recall the days when our folks could finally afford a radio gram, a telephone, and yes a tiny 12 inch black and white tele. The Moon and now Mars , mobile phones, computers, electric motor cars, ( my step father drove a steam driven lorry).
In 1953 I purchased my first bike, I was 14 and had never had one before. That glorious Dayton racing bike with half chromed front forks and painted in a cheerful sunshine yellow was my pride and joy; I think fondly of it still. It carried me from Mitcham to Box Hill, Hampton Court, Farnham, Windsor, which sustained me until I could finally really travel on those magnificent merchant ships. Bikes are coming back in Melbourne, cycle paths everywhere, much to the chagrin of motorists.
So my friend although Cam may go on vacation to the budget resorts of Moon Valley or Mars Beach make sure he remembers your Golden Years, for they are to be treasured.
Best regards to you mate and our fellow dreamers, Neil "Mort" Morton.

happy daze john in oz
13th August 2012, 06:32 AM
I sowed my wild oats while at sea, so settled down [almost] after marriage.
Not sure what would have happened if Ann Margaret walked up my drive and offered herself though!!
Was it Nelson who said.
'We lucky few, we band of brothers'
Den.[/QUOTE]

Sowed wild oats and no doubt like most of us then prayed for a crop failure.

Dennis McGuckin
13th August 2012, 03:57 PM
Thanks Neil, Nicley put.
As far as Cam, or other family members remembering my 'golden years'
The odd time I mention those days they show no interest.
Consequently I don't bring it up anymore.
Maybe that's why I enjoy this site so much. One is free to 'remerniss' without fear of been looked upon as a boring old guy [at least I hope so]
Its quite common on the site to find family researching dads MN days, after he has passed away.
Interesting ain't it!
Den.

Les Woodard
13th August 2012, 11:23 PM
Den I do not think it is disinterrest in your stories that is the problem mate it could be that they are still trying to digest your tab nabs. Maybe if you relented and started to put real rum in them instead of the essence like your ship mates had to put up with LOL.

Tony Morcom
13th August 2012, 11:40 PM
I don't know about you guys, but when I got married the 2nd time every time a movie or program came on about another country she always asked "have you been there?" Frequently the answer was of course yes. Funnily enough after a few months the questions faded away. Now however its started all over again with my daughter. Every time she sees a ship on T.V. its "have you been on that one Daddy?" I just wish I could find a movie or clip on line that actually shows one of my ships sailing so that I could say yes to her ~ just once:)

Lou Barron
14th August 2012, 01:20 AM
Yes being a exMN is something i am very proud of life at sea was totally diferrent than working ashore but having this great site helps to keep those memorys alive

Rodney Mills
14th August 2012, 01:25 AM
John,

It's by William Shakespear...Henry V Act. 4. 3. The most stirring speach to warriors ever written:

...That he that have no stomach to this fight, Let him depart, his passportshall be made....This day is called the feast of Chrispian: He that out lives this day, and comes safe home, Will stand a tip-toe when this day is named, and rouse him at the name of Chrispian.He that shall see this day, and live old age , Will yearly on the virgil feast his neighbors, And say, "Tomorrow is the feast of Chrispian. Then will he strip his sleave and show his scars and say these wounds I had on Chrispians day. Old men forget; yet all shall be forgot, But ours will be remembered with advantages, what feats we did this day. Then shall our names, Familiar in his mouth as household words, Harry the King, Bedford and Exeter, Warwick and Talbot, Salisbury and Gloucester, Be in their flowing cups remembered. This story shall the good man teach his son: And Chrispin Chrispian Shall ne'er go by, from this day forward to the ending of the world, But we in it be remembered; WE FEW, WE HAPPY FEW, WE BAND OF BROTHERS; For he to-day who sheds his blood with me Shall be my brother: be he ne're so vile. This day shall gentle his condition. AND GENTLEMEN IN ENGLAND NOW A-BED, SHALL THINK THEMSELVES ACCURSED THEY WERE NOT HERE; AND HOLD THEIR MANHOOD CHEAP, WHILES ANY SPEAKS THAT FOUGHT WITH US UPON SAINT CHRISPIN'S DAY.

The ENGLISH and WELSH archers are out-numbered 14 to one, it's pissing down with rain and their backs are to a river...cornered, after fighting a rear guard retreat....Five minuets left on the clock, the french attack, The flower of French nobles astride their chargers... English and Welsh archers have a secret weapon...The Long Bow....Final score...3500 French dead, vs. 3 English gentlemen and a mixed bag of 12 yeomen.

Now in any language or history that's one hell of an ass-kicking.

Cheers, Rodney

P.S. Excuse typos it's late here.

Dennis McGuckin
14th August 2012, 02:31 AM
I stand corrected.
Close though eh!!
Den.

Dennis McGuckin
14th August 2012, 02:33 AM
Den I do not think it is disinterrest in your stories that is the problem mate it could be that they are still trying to digest your tab nabs. Maybe if you relented and started to put real rum in them instead of the essence like your ship mates had to put up with LOL.
Les. Thats above and beyond mate.
Den.

Dennis McGuckin
14th August 2012, 03:54 AM
Just discovered that my daughter has invited all on my mailing list to our anniversary open house.1300-1600 August 27 [anniversary is really the 25th but granddaughter is getting married that day].
Let me make this clear.
Would love to see you all, but I am NOT paying for your trip to Vancouver Island .
Call me a cheap b***er but that's the way it is.
However. If you would like to pay your own way for three hours with me [well worth it] go for it.
Den.

happy daze john in oz
14th August 2012, 06:00 AM
Les. Thats above and beyond mate.
Den.



We vseriously need to consider re-floating our virtual ship if you are going back to making rum esence tab nabs.

happy daze john in oz
14th August 2012, 06:02 AM
Just discovered that my daughter has invited all on my mailing list to our anniversary open house.1300-1600 August 27 [anniversary is really the 25th but granddaughter is getting married that day].
Let me make this clear.
Would love to see you all, but I am NOT paying for your trip to Vancouver Island .
Call me a cheap b***er but that's the way it is.
However. If you would like to pay your own way for three hours with me [well worth it] go for it.
Den.



DEn, life has been kind to you, congratulations.

happy daze john in oz
14th August 2012, 06:04 AM
Rodney mate, anything written by Shakespear is enlightening and exiting in my book, love his style and use of the English language.





Just as the kids of today do, you know like.................LOL heaven help them

Les Woodard
14th August 2012, 06:45 AM
Well mate had my flight already booked to be there for three hours but later on found out that all the catering was being done by yourself so under doctors orders had to cancel the flight. Have a great one anyway mate. Have posted a glass of rum over to you so hope it does not spill.

Captain Kong
14th August 2012, 07:14 AM
I`m on my way Dennis . iI have just won the lottery. 4,000,000
See you later
Brian.