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Alistair Kerr
29th October 2008, 01:49 AM
In 1949 I spent nearly eight months as an A.B. in the Fort Carillon, managed by the Union-Castle Mail Steamship Co.Ltd. She was a wartime-built Fort ship, single scfrew, coal-burning and very slow!
We left London heavily loaded with cargo for what was to be the great Groundnut Development Scheme in East Africa. On the foredeck we had two steam locomotives and two ex-R.N.steam launches . Aft we had several earth-moving carryalls.
Our first port was Genoa, then on to Port Said, Port Sudan, Aden, Mombasa, Pemba, Tanga, Dar-es-Salaam, Zanzibar, back to Dar-es-Salaam then on to Lindi and Mikindani where we unloaded the Groundnut Scheme stuff, using the 50-ton 'jumbo' derrick to do that. I might tell you that those locomotives joined about twenty others being overgrown by weeds and, if they haven't rusted away after all those years, no doubt they are still there!
Next it was on to Beira, Durban and Port Elizabeth where we loaded a full cargo of 1,000lb bombs which had been stockpiled there during the war. We took that cargo to the Abu Sultan RAF Base near the Bitter Lakes in the Suez Canal, then made our way back down the coast- Aden, Mombasa, Beira, Durban, Cape Town, Luderitz Bay, Walvis Bay, Hamburg, London.
Our Captain was Capt. A.C.M. Black, the best skipper I ever sailed with in that he treated all the crew as equals and 'gentlemen' and in thhat way got our respect. (Look him up in the U-CMSCo. Staff List).
During our 3 week stay in Port Elizabeth, I met my wife and went back to PE to live there, (1950-1954) I worked as a Cargo supervisor for the UCMSCo for that time. My boss was the Marine Supoerintendent, Capt C.J. Clutterbuck, a real character and a great boss.

alf corbyn
30th October 2008, 11:43 AM
In 1949 I spent nearly eight months as an A.B. in the Fort Carillon, managed by the Union-Castle Mail Steamship Co.Ltd. She was a wartime-built Fort ship, single scfrew, coal-burning and very slow!
We left London heavily loaded with cargo for what was to be the great Groundnut Development Scheme in East Africa. On the foredeck we had two steam locomotives and two ex-R.N.steam launches . Aft we had several earth-moving carryalls.
Our first port was Genoa, then on to Port Said, Port Sudan, Aden, Mombasa, Pemba, Tanga, Dar-es-Salaam, Zanzibar, back to Dar-es-Salaam then on to Lindi and Mikindani where we unloaded the Groundnut Scheme stuff, using the 50-ton 'jumbo' derrick to do that. I might tell you that those locomotives joined about twenty others being overgrown by weeds and, if they haven't rusted away after all those years, no doubt they are still there!
Next it was on to Beira, Durban and Port Elizabeth where we loaded a full cargo of 1,000lb bombs which had been stockpiled there during the war. We took that cargo to the Abu Sultan RAF Base near the Bitter Lakes in the Suez Canal, then made our way back down the coast- Aden, Mombasa, Beira, Durban, Cape Town, Luderitz Bay, Walvis Bay, Hamburg, London.
Our Captain was Capt. A.C.M. Black, the best skipper I ever sailed with in that he treated all the crew as equals and 'gentlemen' and in thhat way got our respect. (Look him up in the U-CMSCo. Staff List).
During our 3 week stay in Port Elizabeth, I met my wife and went back to PE to live there, (1950-1954) I worked as a Cargo supervisor for the UCMSCo for that time. My boss was the Marine Supoerintendent, Capt C.J. Clutterbuck, a real character and a great boss.
hi kiwi ab. i was captain blacks steward on the kenilworth castle from august 1954 to january 1955. as you say he was a real gentleman. i used to practice typing in the radio room when in port and put records on for the crew.he often came up and complimented me on my choices. his wife came on board in greenock and i looked after her little daschund. she was also very nice. cheers. alf

Doc Vernon
30th October 2008, 08:40 PM
Hi Kiwi AB
Although your time at Sea was long before me,your writeup of all those Ports along the African Coast (Aden, Mombasa, Beira, Durban, Cape Town,East London,Port Elizabeth, Walvis Bay, London.etc) bring back fond memories of the days at Sea!
As i have said before,some of you chaps here have really had some good years in the MN and i still to this day wish that i had not been so foolish to leave when i did! I know that i missed out on many good years with many good Friends!
However sometimes circumstances change ones pattern of life,and i suppose we must just be thankfull for what was dished up for us!
Also i read that you married in PE and then worked as Cargo Supervisor for UCL!
Well when i eventually got back home from the UK in 1964 i too worked as a Tally Clerk in Cape Town Harbour under a Mr Curruthers,who was also a real Gentleman! Great guy,i wonder sometimes whatever happened to him!
By the way Kiwi,that Staff Register for UCL seems to have vanished? Any ideas!As i was on that too with Pics etc!but cannot find it anywhere!
Cheers yours aws good reading mate!
:)

Gulliver
30th October 2008, 09:39 PM
:)To;kiwiAB.,Alf,Castleman etc.What terrific recollections!.It adds to all those south/east African memories of those places I can connect to.(albeit 10 to 20 years later)

I hope(trust) that one day all our memories will be recorded for posterity by this site.

Good on you,mates!
Davey

Harvey Williams
2nd November 2008, 08:34 PM
Hello kiwiab. That really was some trip you had there, just reading those ports bought back many memories, a good while after your escapade you understand, I did a good few trips with T.&.J.Harrisons ( Two of fat and one of lean.) fame The Tactician, and also a few Union Castle jobs, Richmond Castle, Tantallon Castle, Tintagel Castle. and the Windsor Castle.It was whilst working aboard the Tintagel Castle that I suffered pretty bad burns whilst working in the Engine Room,( My original job at sea ) I dont wish to apportion blame on anyone but the in-experience of a Junior Engineer trying to cut cornrers on the job of draining the fuel line to the Donkey Boiler, that we had a massive blow-back and yours truly was just in the process of filling a 5 gallon drum of what can only be described as Watery Oil, via the burner housing, resulting in me suffering pretty bad burns. At that time we where just going to safe anchorage overnight outside East London. As soon as we did go alongside following morning one of the first up the gangway was a Doctor and two Paramedics. I was taken ashore to The Frere Hospital, where I remained for two and a half months, I then stayed in the Grand Hotel for nearly three weeks, and attending Hospital as an out-patient, of course the inevitable occured and I copped for a Nurse, we used to go to the Beach Hotel a lot. But the time came and I had to leave by means of the Windsor Castle, working as ( believe it or not, a bloody Saloon Steward, winging in Tourest Class.) can you imagine it, coming out of the Engine Room, having been a Rag Ar**d Fireman, to wearing a bloody dickie bow and serving passengers. But lets forget that story, the main reason I wrote to you my good fellow was simply to enquire as to how much East London has changed since1969/70 to the present day.
I do get some snippets from the Sports Reporter of,I think its The Argus, namely a Peter Martin, I contacted him via my interest in my second sport, namely Cricket. But Sir, being ex-seafarers you and I speak the same language, and I would just be very interested to know how things are in East London, and not just your good self, but any other Gentlemen who have settled anywhere in South Africa, a place I had the pleasure of visiting a good few times, and enjoyed it very much.
Sorry to bore you, and anyone else who has had to endure the torture of reading this message. Will leave you Sir and all other readers a Very Good Night.
Regards.
Harvey.

Ken R651123.
26th November 2008, 01:30 AM
Hi. The staff register is still there, I've just been into it to check. Ken.

http://union-castle.net/

Doc Vernon
26th November 2008, 08:16 AM
Hi Ken,
Thanks for letting us now about the UCL Staff Reg. and yes i have looked in now as well,good job its still going,but has a new facelift to it!
Cheers

happy daze john in oz
27th November 2008, 12:50 AM
Hi Ken,
Thanks for letting us now about the UCL Staff Reg. and yes i have looked in now as well,good job its still going,but has a new facelift to it!
Cheers

Good site Vernon, but have you noticed it only has the 'gold braid' brigade listed, no mention of the workers?????:eek:

Ian Warren
27th November 2008, 07:34 AM
While it does appear to be mainly officers, they do also include the workers. My details are on the site, and I was just a bell boy http://union-castle.net/shipmates_Warren_Ian_01.htm.

I seem to recall that Owen was anxious to hear from other crew members, so that he could add them.

Ian

Geoff Anderson
27th November 2008, 08:18 AM
Good site Vernon, but have you noticed it only has the 'gold braid' brigade listed, no mention of the workers?????:eek:

hey John.
You ll be told off for swearing again.w-----s we'll have to wash your mouth out with soap with any more of that talk. lol
best wishes geoff. :D

happy daze john in oz
27th November 2008, 08:43 AM
While it does appear to be mainly officers, they do also include the workers. My details are on the site, and I was just a bell boy http://union-castle.net/shipmates_Warren_Ian_01.htm.

I seem to recall that Owen was anxious to hear from other crew members, so that he could add them.

Ian

I wrote to Owen late last year and got a reply but not sure if he published it.:eek:

marty
27th November 2008, 08:31 PM
I also saild under Captain black,oct 56/57.Spent exmas in capetown,mainly in the Delmonica, not sure about spelling.We arrived on chistmas eve two other ships arrived at the same time.a yankee destroyer,and a empire troop ship,full of our tommies on their way home from the far east.The delmonica was so full we were drinking on the pavements,must have been 3/4 hundred there all told,I dont know what started it but suddenly all hell let loose,there was glasses,bottles tables chairs and any thing else at hand flying.It all spilled out onto the road and a couple of vans of police arrived.They took one look got back into their vans and dissapeared again.then the yanks M.Ps arrived,and done the same.it eventualy cooled down Ithink we were all nackered.started drinking again and singing Carols.The yanks and tommies were all confined to their ships the next day because of the fighting,we had Capetown to ourselves.Sorry I forgot to say the ship's name it was the Good Hope Castle.registered in capetown.
cheers Marty.

Alistair Kerr
2nd December 2008, 03:48 AM
Hello Marty,
I'd have to say that we didn't go to Cape Town in the Fort Carillon- about the only pport between Suez and Walvis bay that we missed!
I did go ashore there when in the Dominion Monarch but was probably too broke to go to Delmonico's!
Tell me, what are your memories of Captain Black?
Cheeers
Alistair Kerr
KiwiAB

allan shaw
3rd December 2008, 12:22 PM
Hello KiwiAb On The M.V.Sutherland inthe 1940"s the crew were asked to leave Delmonico"S as we were "improperly dressed" no one was wearing a tie,we ended up in the" wites only" end of a very long bar going ashore for a few pints with a tie on? naw.
Cheers Allan.

happy daze john in oz
4th December 2008, 05:43 AM
G'day Allan, there was a time when you could not get into the bar of the Grand Hotel in Cape Town during the evening unless you were wearing a suit. Thankfully times have changed.

alf corbyn
4th December 2008, 10:52 AM
Hello Marty,
I'd have to say that we didn't go to Cape Town in the Fort Carillon- about the only pport between Suez and Walvis bay that we missed!
I did go ashore there when in the Dominion Monarch but was probably too broke to go to Delmonico's!
Tell me, what are your memories of Captain Black?
Cheeers
Alistair Kerr
KiwiAB
hello kiwi ab. captain black was a entleman. he once gave me a rollicking for being late with a pot of tea. i thought he was going to cry. i burst out laughing so did the mate, and even when i was playing records after midnight he only ased me to turn it down a little. cheers. alf

Chris Isaac
3rd April 2013, 05:22 PM
By no stretch of any imagination can it be said to include only officers.
I have now taken over the running of this site and am currently rebuilding it using modern technology.
In future it will have a new address and will include ALL of the British & Commonwealth Group.

If any of you wish to be included then please send me a private message giving me your email address so that I can send you a document to fill in with your details.
I want to hear from as many of you as possible that sailed on any B&C ship in any capacity. I want to hear personal stories and would love any old photos. If you do have old slides/negatives then they can be posted to me and I can scan them and return them.

The new site will go live in a few weeks time.

Hoping to hear from as many of you as possible.
Regards
Chris Isaac

PS the purpose of the site is to provide your children/grand children/great grand children with answers to what you did when you were at sea.

Captain Kong
4th April 2013, 11:34 AM
Hi Harvey,
East London has changed for the worse. It was a lovely little town in the early 50s but not anymore.
I was in East London in December 1953 when my mate, Ken Hignett was drowned at Bonza Bay and I was taken to hospital there. see "A Voyage on the New Zealand Star" in the seafaring stories thread in Swinging the Lamp.
I went back in 2001, to find his grave, and the town had been taken over by the Africans and it was totally unsafe to walk the street then, even the cemetery was unsafe from being mugged and battered. I was escorted there by friends who stood guard while I attended the grave.
The Seamens Mission on Buffalo Street was closed and was now a school, I saw the Head and she took me around inside.
Friends who once lived there including the lad who saved my life had all gone to better places.
Very sad.
Cheers
Brian.

robpage
4th April 2013, 12:46 PM
In Reply to Post #8 from HDJ then I was going to say if you had signed on in your own name rather than Union Castle Martha you might be listed too , but that will only cause dissension , so i won;t say it :rollinglaugh:

robpage
4th April 2013, 12:51 PM
Reading post # 18 from Brian , I think a good Quiz would be name the port where Brian has not been to the Hospital ,. but that could be a tough one

Captain Kong
4th April 2013, 01:36 PM
Hi Rob,
I have done a world tour of hospitals.
Some good, some bad.
Many in UK, Liverpool, Aberdeen, Edinburgh, London Dreadnought, Greenwich and St Thomas`s, Chatham
Rotterdam. Barcelona. Patras , Port Said, Al Khobar, Mombasa, East London, Cape Town, Lagos , Port Harcourt, Curacao, San Francisco, Honolulu, Sydney, Penang, Singapore,
also on Queen Elizabeth crossing Pacific, Minerva in Antarctic, Statendam crossing Pacific, on QE2 in West Indies.
Some interesting places.

Good Health
Brian

Ivan Cloherty
4th April 2013, 03:18 PM
Brings a whole new meaning to 'Health Tourist' :sick:

robpage
4th April 2013, 05:12 PM
I went to Southampton once , I lead a boring life !

Gulliver
4th April 2013, 06:56 PM
I could barely look at all those pictures of Brian in every chapter of The Ship Captain’s Medical Guide !
One section I notice has been pulled from the latest edition-’How to Remove A Tongue stuck Firmly in a Cheek ‘.
Only joking Brian,I know you’ve had more than your share of bad luck medical wise.
You should write a companion volume to The Shoregoers Guide to World Ports ..perhaps ‘The Sick and Accident-Prone Seafarers Guide to World Hospitals?
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Keep Well!
Gulliver

Captain Kong
4th April 2013, 07:53 PM
Hi Rob I forgot to mention Southampton, and Brighton by ambulance from Newhaven.
.
What a good idea Davey, I will think about that.
The Sick and Accident-Prone Seafarers Guide to World Hospitals?
.
I have been rebuilt a few times, 120 stitches 14 broken bones, four operations, gassed and a few fevers., But I am still here amazingly, plus a number of near death experiences. So I am happy.
My only problem from now will be to get more travel insurance, or will it be stopped.
It sure feels good to be alive.
Cheers and good health to everyone.
Brian.

robpage
4th April 2013, 09:07 PM
Good job you wasn't an Engineer Brian you might have got really hurt :sick:

Tony Wilding
5th April 2013, 04:20 AM
A photo of Fort Carillion at Cape Town.12442

Doc Vernon
5th April 2013, 04:33 AM
Hi Tony W
A very unusual Pic of a Ship coming into Cape Town,i dont think i have seen one like this,as it is approaching from the back end of Lions Head,by the looks of it!
A rare approach as most Ships then and now approach from a more direct route and enter Cape Town sort of head on between Lions Head and the lovely Mountain,giving a clear view of the Harbour entrance!
But mate this is one great shot!
Thanks

Can see Table Mountain in the backdrop!
It is also quite close to the Seafront along the Seapoint Beaches!
Nevertheless a beautifull approach for both Crew and Spectators on the Sea Point Front!
I wonder how many People that see this Pic may remember that day!?

Doc Vernon
5th April 2013, 04:57 AM
Indeed much has changed in most South African Cities,and like Capt says East London used to be such a quaint and clean City,we would always go to Orient Beach a lovely place to just lie and Bake in the Sun and swim in that surf!
I am sure many of you here would have remembered it that way!
It is so sad to see places like that going under so to speak,and i often wonder what befalls the rest of South Africa!
To me Cape Town is the best place left there,and as i went there only last September,i found it still much the same on the whole,yes there are changes,but most of these changes are for the better there,thank goodness!
Never saw or got involved in any trouble at all whilst there,and i went out alone many times!
Certainly would not do that in places like Joburg,Durbs,East London! The only other place that seems to be not too bad is Port Elizabeth!
Its also sad to hear that the Seamans Mission in EL has now gone,but if it is now a School.well i suppose that is something good!
Oh how time has changed so many places and things!
Time i fear for me to think of departing this unstable World! Eeeeeeeek:confused: !!LOL!;)
Cheers be good!

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happy daze john in oz
5th April 2013, 05:45 AM
In Reply to Post #8 from HDJ then I was going to say if you had signed on in your own name rather than Union Castle Martha you might be listed too , but that will only cause dissension , so i won;t say it :rollinglaugh:

Ooh you ae awful, but nice with it!!

Ivan Cloherty
5th April 2013, 08:56 AM
A photo of Fort Carillion at Cape Town.12442


Nice picture, must have been a good company to work for, even got their own bus for touring :0012:

robpage
5th April 2013, 03:57 PM
I expect an Engineer nicked it and hid it out of sight of the mate , a Clan Line Chief Engineer in the Port of Walvis Bay was chastised by those nice South-African Policemen for Borrowing a Railway Engine .he was happily running it up and down the Quay side whilst it had been abandoned by its driver and fireman during their lunchtime . We were delayed sailing on a cargo boat whilst a third engineer returned a very nice memorial bench to the gardens at the top of Adderley Street , Skipper was not impressed ,but it was a nice bench , so a double decker , no problem to a Union Castle Engineer

Lancelot Fowler
17th May 2015, 09:47 AM
Good morning Chris,

Thanks for the info. and it would be nice to be included on the list.

Lance Fowler,
Radio Officer,
Ships Pretoria, Cape Town, Edinburgh, Stirling, Riebeck, Kenilworth Castles.
Period 1960-64.
Now retired and living in France.

vic mcclymont
17th May 2015, 01:24 PM
Out of the fruit season in 1971, on the Clan Ranald we did a general cargo trip, to Mauritius, which included 4 ex London Buses for Lourenco Marques.
During the voyage when the mate was pissed he used sit in the cab of one of the buses and pretend he was driving it.
The 4E who was from Ceylon, used to go and ring the bells.

Chris Beard
1st October 2015, 12:54 PM
Hello is there anyone about that was on this ship?

Hello
For years I have wondered what my granddad got up to during WW2 and have started to research the ships he was on.
I know he was torpedo 3 times but as a young child he never told any stories so have little to go on.
I do have a picture of his log book and I'm trying to work my way through the ships and one of they has brought me here.
The Fort Carilon which he was on during 7/7/44 to 8/11/44
his name was Name: Gilligan, John Joseph. Service number: R92768. Date of birth: 20/05/1914.

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