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Ivan Cloherty
27th July 2012, 08:52 AM
Graham I think you have solved the reason that there is so much anger among passengers on airlines. Okay so there are still smokers out there and why the heck do we still insist that all area's be smoke free surely they can dedicate one area for smokers with the appropriate ventilation. We can drink alcohol and shoot up drugs even have sex (now that would really make a smoker yearn for one) and such but take out one fag and you are the worlds worse because of so many bloody reformed smokers insisting on reforming others. Face up to it there are those that have lived and are living to a ripe old age and have smoked all their lives so just because a some of us do not have the genes in our system to withstand smoking why should we condemn them.

Just want to point out that we are all different so why the feck do we insist on everyone living in a world made up of clones of ourselves. I am bloody glad that there are so many variations of the human being it is what we call living in a diverse life style and not a robotic one.

Les you have the right to your opinion and I respect that, but just occasionaly dwell on the other side of the coin. My first wife, was a non smoker and non drinker, she didn't need it, she was a lively bubbly person, small, active always doing things for others died when aged only 50, cause of death, cancer in both lungs and the liver, brought on by "passive smoking" from her work environment. From diagnosis to death was four months, not only devastating for me after 28 years of honeymoon but much worse for my two teenage daughters, the job of telling your children about the diagnosis and life expectancy, is not a job I would wish on my worst enemy. Whilst I appreciate that people like a smoke and that is their right and I would never dream of trying to reform them,I do think that some of the restrictions placed on smoking in public places has a place in society which benefits non smokers and smokers alike, albeit that the smokers may not recognise it as such.

As for smoking on planes with a section for smokers, great in theory but never worked in practice, I did thousands upon thousands of miles by air in an earlier life flying from port to port looking after ships, if you got a seat in the three back rows of the non-smoking section (you didn't always have a choice of seat) you may as well have been in the middle of the smokers for all the difference it made.

So sometimes a little bit of public conformity can be a good thing, although I do recognise that that is not always the case. I am a non smoker so my opinion and views may not be as untainted as they could possibly be

Rgds Ivan

Chris Allman
27th July 2012, 08:56 AM
just hope I don't turn into one of those avid anti-smokers who have given up the weed!
rgds
JA

If you do, you will be a lot healthier John - dont knock it till you have tried it - oh by the way it cuts down dramatically on the home decorating too as you dont have to decorate as often, no brown stains on the ceilings and walls, now come on that must be an incentive :)

Chris.

Capt Bill Davies
27th July 2012, 09:51 AM
Sometimes sound advice from a friend or someone who you respect is all that is needed.
Prior to 69 I was a heavy smoker, heavy being 60 Senior Service pd.
In 69 I was Master of the SS Phoenix when I received an unexpected and unannounced visitor whilst discharging in some Canadian port in the form of the owner Dan Ludwig. I found him on the Bridge sitting drinking coffee at 0600 attired in his standard khaki drill.
He gave me a fatherly like chat/warning on the perils of smoking for some 30 minutes and that was unusual for a man who rarely ventured far from business at hand.
Needless to say I have not touched a cigarette since that day for which I will be eternally (pardon the pun) grateful.
Subsequently found out he left the bulk of his vast fortune to the Jari Foundation (Research in Cancer).

Brgds

Bill

Neville Roberts
27th July 2012, 12:55 PM
I am an ex smoker 54 years ,now off them for almost 5 years and i have too laugh at all the adds on tv about smoking . when you go out of your home onto the streets with all the deisel and petrol fumes . and they rant about second hand smoke its silly .I agree though the house is a lot cleaner after we stopped . so stop smoking in the house as a first way too stopping . I worked in a smoke filled bar and restaurant for 21 years in NYC after 10 years at sea .and also remember the doctors office with a large ash tray on his desk . there are many people I know who have had heart attacks and cancer whio never smoked ,is that through second hand smoke, I dont think so. when I see obese people turning up their noses at smokers , it makes me want to tell them too stop offending my vision .so you lads who are strugling with giving up the( fags ) thats cigarettes OK .keep it up you wont regret it. think of the $$$$$ saved .Nev.:cool:

Ivan Cloherty
27th July 2012, 01:16 PM
I know who have had heart attacks and cancer whio never smoked ,is that through second hand smoke, I dont think so. :cool:

Well Neville, unless you have been unfortunate enough to be closely involved (my post #251) then perhaps my judgement is clouded by the worldwide experts who told me my wifes cancer was caused by Passive Smoking, and believe me I didn't go to just one expert to try and get my wife's illness reversed. Guess I'd rather believe the experts than a doubting Thomas who has apparently been lucky, I hope you maintain your luck mate. The $$$$$$$$ thing is unimportant when you lose your most valued possession.

Rgds

Ivan

Captain Kong
27th July 2012, 02:26 PM
The entertainer Roy Castle died of Passive smoking from appearing in Night Clubs, etc. He was a life long Non Smoker.
My son is a Cancer expert, a Consultant Oncologist, He worked in the States in Seattle at the world famous Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Centre, he told me many years ago, in 1990. to keep off the ciggies and avoid areas where people smoke. as passive smoking is even more dangerous than the smoking.
Since then I have watched two close friends dying, screaming in a pain that cannot be controlled even with intraveinous Morphine.
If you get Lung Cancer , when you get the symptons it is already too late.
The choice is yours,

.
Brian.

Capt Bill Davies
27th July 2012, 02:58 PM
If you get Lung Cancer , when you get the symptons it is already too late.
The choice is yours,

.
Brian.

Thanks for cheering everybody up Brian!

Brgds

Bill

Graham Payne
27th July 2012, 03:18 PM
Graham, as you began this post some time ago I was wondering how things are going. Pulled all your hair out, bitten finger nails to the quick, put on weight, climbed up walls. Besides all of that hwo is it now?
Hi John, thanks for asking,
still going "just" :eek:
the main problem I have is that I have gone from 9st 7lbs to 11 bloody stone ( all in 6 months ) and no prizes as to where this excess weight has gone, straight to my belly, had to buy all new trousers was 32 inch now 34 inches and growing :mad:, thank god for elasticated waist bands on trousers.

Captain Kong
27th July 2012, 03:35 PM
About time you put some weight on Graham,
I am 16 stones now, Dont smoke any more and in 12 months have lost 19 pounds. Last year I was 17 stone five pounds Lots of good exercise.
Happy eating,
Cheers
Brian.

Les Woodard
27th July 2012, 04:07 PM
I to packed on the fat when I gave up years ago and still struggling to keep it down to a level I am happy with. Understand that there are a lot of people who have had and are having problems because of lax laws years ago concerning passive smoking but it got me to thinking that as a kid in the fifties how we used to go to school and not being able to see your hand in front of you because of the smog. Now if I was not inhaling what would amount to fifty fags in such a short time. Can still remember how so many people would be coughing and spluttering then as well. Giving up the fags is bad enough without so many using the guilt tag to denigrate those that are trying. I found that when ever I tried to give it up and people started to go on about how better of I would be had the opposite affect. As I have said in the past I never gave the fags up I just decided to see how long I could go before I had the next one so had every intention of having another one except that it has been about two decades in the waiting and now I can not recall where the bloody packet is any more. Of course I have sympathy for those that have suffered from passive smoking and would not dispute it but lets face it we where breathing in more sh8t than just smoke years ago and still do if only we knew what it was. Still maintain that there are those that have different systems that it attacks and those that it does not attack. As an aside here in our area you are allowed to eat and smoke in open air areas and clubs have smoking areas as well as poker machine rooms for smokers. Do admit that I do not like the smell of smokers but that is a personal view and would not force those that smoke to quit just to please me. I to have lost close ones to cancer but will not use the sympathy card either.

Ivan Cloherty
27th July 2012, 04:47 PM
I to have lost close ones to cancer but will not use the sympathy card either.

Les I do hope that was not a dig at me, because I never asked for anyones sympathy, if people want to smoke then let them, it's their life. I was relating a personal experience of smoke and smoking and if you read my posts not advocating outright bans anywhere, as each person has to choose their own destiny though even by doing so it may have detrimental effects on others, but that is for their conscience alone.

Ivan

Kenneth Kenny
27th July 2012, 05:03 PM
Hi Jim,I packed up smoking 1967,when on strike on the docks the fifth week of six week strike,brother Alex was in the Cunard ships always brought me 200cigs home each trip.My dad was a heavy smoker died of lung cancer did he suffer.two brothers and the sister same.I was Elven stone,now forteen stone musel.Will Power his the name of it.Ken.

Neville Roberts
28th July 2012, 01:26 PM
Lets not forget all the other polution that we are exposed too every day , if you are around my age you will remember all the chimneys spewing out coal smoke especialy in the winter ,made Liverpool look like it was fogged in . its an easy way out too blame one thing for all the lung ailments .and if I ever get lung cancer and cant stand the pain I will just end it .one shot and its all over .our family never had a long life span all gone in thier 60 and early 70.s except for my Dad lasted till eighty but was sick for the last 4 years . I seem too be doing ok , maybe its all the running and on my feet 10 hours a day in smokey restaurants for 40 years .cough cough .gorra go now and do my 5 mile bike ride every day .tatar der ar kids .Nev.:cool:

Jim Brady
14th October 2012, 06:16 PM
Lets go back to Grahams original post September last year,this post got quite a good following and many said they were going to give up the dreaded weed, just how many succeeded and how many fell by the wayside.I myself was quite proud and feeling smug of the fact that I had packed them up and that I would never smoke again!!!However August last, every minute of the day I was craving for a cigarette,I must have just one just to see what it is like I thought.I got some tobacco and had a quick wiff,ecstacy I thought so what I will do is just have a quick one on my walk around for my morning paper every day.Quite enjoyable having this one smoke per day it satisfied the craving and nobody knew!!I was having some building work done on the house so I started going out talking to the builders and having a sly wiff.The rest is history I was back on them good style hook line and sinker.I can tell you that since starting again I dont feel as good as I did without them so I took action to pack them in again,went back to the clinic last week and now its four days without a smoke.Has anybody else fell by the wayside I hope not and the dreams of having a cruise with the money that you have saved has come true.Or what else have you done with the money(not being nosey by the way but just interested)
Regards.
Jim.B.

Calvin Kent
14th October 2012, 06:43 PM
My ex-wife started smoking, idiotically, at the age of forty. I told her if she would have a go at giving up I'd put forty-five plus years of smoking behind me and join her. The only stipulation was I'd leave it until new year and my youngest sons eighteenth birthday were out the way.

I'd been told about tablets called Champix but doctors don't like to dish them out. Fortunately my doctor was due to retire so didn't give a chit about the budget. You start taking these tablets a week or so before the date you want to stop smoking and then for I think three months afterwards. After starting the course I found I didn't know why I was smoking and so stopped smoking before my due date. I can honestly say that apart from the occasional reach towards my pocket out of habit I had no withdrawal symptoms at all. Neither did my ex. I stopped taking the tablets after six weeks expecting the urge to come back but it hasn't. That was January 4th this year and my only regret is I didn't know about Champix sooner. T'other thing is that extra 40 a week comes in really handy now I'm on pension.

Regards

Calvin

Captain Kong
14th October 2012, 07:37 PM
I packed in smoking for nine months, I was over it, no problem.
I went to a Dinner, the only thing missing to complete it was a Cigar with a glass of brandy. that is all I had,
Next morning I was screaming up the wall for ciggies and was out buying them first thing and was back on them again with a vengence.
I lasted for six months and started to stop again and this time I did it, and that was 23 years ago on August 4th 1989.
Other people smoking doesnt bother me, but I know that if I had one ciggy or cigar I would be away again.
It is like being an alcoholic, you can keep off it, but you know that one will start you up again. no matter how long you have stopped.
BUT look on the on the bright side, one pack a day at around 7 is 56 a week which is just under 3,000 a year. enough for a decent cruise. or the equivalent over the last 23 years at todays prices is around 69,000, So that is not to be coughed at.
You can do a few things with that kind of saving.
Cheers
Brian


















36

John Pruden
14th October 2012, 07:38 PM
Jim i packet them in for 18 months a few years ago but fell again the champex tablets are very good and if you stick to the plan you will pack up!!!! me i like a smoke i don't drink but have a few fags a day i did the plan but had side effects due to other medication the beauty of champex is you have a smoke as normal and the craving stops after 3 to 4 weeks they will definitely make you pack up? good luck.jp

Jim Brady
14th October 2012, 07:53 PM
Brian and John,I know what it is like to be off them and to be back on them is not the answer.I must admit that I cannot deny the enjoyment from having a smoke but there are more reasons for not smoking that outweigh the reasons to smoke.I should get over the craving in about 2 weeks and this time I hope it's for good.I must say that in the last 8 weeks or so that I restarted smoking I have seen a big differnce in my spending although i have been taking it easy its still just over 20 quid a week,some dosh over a year.
Regards.
Jim.B.

Captain Kong
14th October 2012, 07:57 PM
Keep it up Jim, you know it makes sense.
good luck.
Brian

John Callon
14th October 2012, 08:01 PM
I too went on the Champix tablets which helped me to stop smoking.However I had a reaction to them after a week - nausea, no appetite. Decided to flush them down the toilet and went cold turkey. That was almost 5 years ago and never touched a cigarette since. The very smell of them puts me off. Just wish I had not packed them up 20 years ago.
Regards
John

happy daze john in oz
15th October 2012, 05:36 AM
JIm #264 I was like you at one time. Had my first at the tender age of about 8, by 16 was on Capstan Full Strength. Gave it up three times before I quit. Tried cigars in between, no good had to go back. Then in 1973 I got the flu, never touched them since. So hang in and be strong, get some climbing boots for when you go up the wall, but it will not last too long.

Les Woodard
15th October 2012, 05:49 AM
Calvin I managed after about twenty false starts over the years to just see how long I could go without one and every intention of having one later on. Got to say I have been a non smoker for decades now and if I had one now it would take my head of. As for the tablets well they had a campaign here where you could get a months supply on perscription and the wife decided after a while to also stop smoking using the tablets. As anyone doing so where only entitled to one months supply I was like a drug addict going around all the people we knew that had tried them and given up and got there supply as well. Long story short ended up with a about five months worth of tablets and she did not need them all but is also a non smoker now. Why I decided not to give it up was because when ever I tried every rectum replica came out of the wood work to make my life impossible not to mention the amount of problems that seemed to crop up to test me out each time I tried. You can be sure that as soon as you tell anyone that you are giving up the weed that all your problems will descend upon you until you are a wimping heap on the ground screaming out for that nicotine. My advice is to not have one for the next hour and then contenplate doing it for another hour but NEVER I repeat NEVER tell anyone at your peril be it if you do.

Gulliver
15th October 2012, 06:55 AM
It's a no brainer. Quite apart from ruining your health and controlling your daily life the extra 200 a month certainly comes in handy.I'm not talking indulgences like expensive cruises but just everyday living,and knowing you have that extra 200 in the bank every month to pay your bills.Not a good idea to put it in a jar-you'll keep raiding it.
I stopped smoking for 6 years,then foolishly restarted for another 12 years.I've been smokefree again now for the last 6 years.The last time I did it cold turkey-it was OK after the first week.Hardly ever think about them now.Almost all of my friends in the pub have now stopped.I must admit the thought of having one now makes me feel physically sick for a moment or two., such is my aversion to them,but that's not a bad thing to have.
I realise everyone has different lifetime circumstances and reacts differently to nicotine withdrawal,but as many of us ex-smokers say "If I can stop anyone can.".

That extra 200 per month- is why I get so annoyed when people complain about having to cut down on food or items or visit those so-called 'Food Banks' to feed their kids when I see them buying fags in the shop.

Spending (i.e. throwing away)money on other extravagances like running a car is another of my pet hates,but I'd better stop there...I can hear Ivan's pen fingers beating a tattoo on his keyboard !....

Gulliver

Les Woodard
15th October 2012, 10:58 PM
Do you not love it when you see them on the TV pleading poverty and how they can not feed the tin lids or pay the bills with a fag in the mit and manicured nails plus wearing the latest fashions

Lou Barron
15th October 2012, 11:48 PM
It is just WILLPOWER mate

Les Woodard
16th October 2012, 02:40 AM
Got a centre up the road that has a guaranteed success rate for giving up smoking. The Crem. One puff and it is all over.

Julie Leonard
21st December 2012, 09:07 PM
I have just seen my dad's post on this thread & it's really sad to see what he wrote as he is no longer with us because of smoking. He was lucky that they managed to surgically remove the cancer from one lung & he recovered well from that op. However 3 years later he developed small cell lung cancer in the other lung, secondary liver cancer & finally it spread to his brain.

I would never have imagined such a rapid decline in a once huge, healthy man was possible. In the end he was unable to walk because the cancer was attacking his motor coordination. His speech was slurred & he would get halfway through a sentence & forget what he was saying.

I miss my lovely daddy every day. The pain of his loss is quite unbearable at times. Cancer is evil & I would urge you not to smoke unless you want to end up like him. : (

Captain Kong
21st December 2012, 09:27 PM
So sorry Julie, but I hope the smokers heed the warning.
I lost two friends over the last two years, identical illness to your Dad.
I hope the pain eases soon.
All the best
Brian.

John Callon
21st December 2012, 10:00 PM
In mid November my partners brother was diagnosed with terminal cancer of the lower part of the esophagus. He was given a life span of 11 months maximum. At the end of that month he suffered a series of mini strokes followed by a main stroke. He is now paralysed down his left side, cannot walk and has no movement at all. This has resulted in him being too weak to receive any treatment for the cancer i.e. radiotherapy of chemo. Today he was discharged from hospital and sent home to die as an invalid. The time frame has been reduced from 11 months to maybe 8 weeks. Did he smoke? Yes!! If you do smoke read this again and again and think how this poor man must feel just 4 days before Christmas.
Sincere Regards
John

Julie Leonard
21st December 2012, 10:14 PM
So sorry Julie, but I hope the smokers heed the warning.
I lost two friends over the last two years, identical illness to your Dad.
I hope the pain eases soon.
All the best
Brian.

Thank you & I am so sorry for your losses too. : ( The irony is that as my dad said he stopped smoking 15 years ago. He realised how much he actually hated the smell of smokers once he had stopped. He also said that if he knew he was going to live this long he would have taken better care of himself.

It feels like the pain of his loss will never ease but I guess it's still early days. My brother & I now have to go & empty his house, a job we are putting off until after Xmas. I am dreading it. I have many happy memories of times spent with my dad there. I don't want to pack his life into boxes. : (

Julie Leonard
21st December 2012, 10:28 PM
In mid November my partners brother was diagnosed with terminal cancer of the lower part of the esophagus. He was given a life span of 11 months maximum. At the end of that month he suffered a series of mini strokes followed by a main stroke. He is now paralysed down his left side, cannot walk and has no movement at all. This has resulted in him being too weak to receive any treatment for the cancer i.e. radiotherapy of chemo. Today he was discharged from hospital and sent home to die as an invalid. The time frame has been reduced from 11 months to maybe 8 weeks. Did he smoke? Yes!! If you do smoke read this again and again and think how this poor man must feel just 4 days before Christmas.
Sincere Regards
John

I am really sorry to hear this too. My thoughts are with your family at this difficult time.

We were told by the oncologist that my dad had possibly 3 months to live after they discovered the cancer had spread to his brain. He was dead a week later. His decline was quite frankly shocking but I believe that once he realised he would not walk again he just gave up. He fought a long & brave battle with cancer & remained so positive until it took away his ability to look after himself any longer.

Were it not for the fact that I have children I would cancel Xmas this year because I'm struggling to find that cheery spirit we're supposed to have.

Keith Moody
21st December 2012, 10:45 PM
this thread seems to have brought out a lot of people who do not usualy say anything on here, it must also be a record for the longest thread? also a very interesting one.
my own experiance i will put down.......
if any of you visited Dover in your MN days and you went ashore to have a few bevvies, you would probly ended up in my mothers pub "The Prince Regent" she took over as landlady back in 1936 until the 1970`s. in Dover it was rated as one of the roughest pubs in that area, her bar clients (customers) were either sailors or army personell as Dover was both a seaport and a garrison town, so you can guess that we had quite a few altercations almost every night, mum always kept a big wooden mallet under the bar, dad was ex-army first world war sergent instructor on rough riding (horses), he was also a boxing champ and was not afraid of anybody, so between them they kept the fights down. in those days everyone smoked.
after the war when i was growing up we would get the family together for one day of the year and set to and wash all the walls and ceiling down and get off as much of the nicotine as possible, this had to be scrubbed with a brush in a lot of the areas and some just wouldn`t come off. we all lived upstairs above the bar so all the smoke would drift up and smell out the place, we didn`t notice as we were in it all the time. both mum and dad smoked so it was only natural that my sisters and i eventualy took up the habit, dad eventualy died at the age of 64, whilst mum lived to be 93, but she did give up smoking at the age of 76 as she wasn`t sure but said it might endanger her health if she carried on. i smoked for years thoughout my MN days and also when i worked for the airlines, both places had duty free.
Passengers on board our flights were allowed to smoke, there was no seperate area for the non-smokers, on the earlier aircraft the cabin air was not changed as often as it is now on the moderm aircraft, back in the early 1960`s on the Boeing 707 it was completly changed every 2minutes now it is even quicker.
when i moved to canada i did various jobs and ended up buying myselfe a small 14 room hotel in the country, at this time it wasn`t unusual for me to be buying 3 packs of ciggies a day and consumig them all, then 17 years ago we got hit with a weekend of heavy snowstorms, freezing rain and bitterly cold winds, like a lot of other people I managed to get the flu and was laid up for a week, during this time i tried a few cigaretts and they all tasted like a greek athelets arm pit (not that i have ever tasted one, only what i have heard !!) so i gave it up there and then, since that time I do not seem to have saved much money or even feel healther for it, so for me to give advice I would say, read all you can and MAKE YOUR OWN DECISSIONS.
keith moody
R635978

happy daze john in oz
22nd December 2012, 04:59 AM
In our youth we thought we were invincible, smoke, drink, root we had it all no one even considered the future beyond the next voyage. But in time it often comes back to haunt us, some dramaticaly, others not so bad. The excess of youth have not diminished, you only have to look at the youth of today, drink and now drugs. What future are they building for themselves??
Today we all know the dangers of what we do, in our day very few even considered it, I got to 100 smokes a day at one point, but have not had one since 1973, however I will not preach to any thta choose to smoke, it is their decission to do so.

j.sabourn
22nd December 2012, 08:21 AM
Was recently in hospital for day surgery to remove a growth on voice box, just about had no voice for about 3 months before plucked up courage to see a specialist. Was certain in my mind it was something serious as I had smoked up until about 30 years ago, about 80 a day, duty free of course. The pollop was removed 2 months ago and sent for a biopsy. Have heard nothing back so assume it was not malignant, I was sure in my mind it was. I consider myself very lucky. I also know people who have never smoked with the same as I had and was the big C. I would not be able to afford to smoke the way I used to, which at the time was the main reason for my stopping. Cheers John Sabourn

Ivan Cloherty
22nd December 2012, 09:43 AM
.

Were it not for the fact that I have children I would cancel Xmas this year because I'm struggling to find that cheery spirit we're supposed to have.

Julie there are few words of comfort that one can give in these situations, my first wife a non smoker and non drinker died of cancer in both lungs and the liver when young leaving me with two teenage daughters, but during her short illness she always insisted that we did not grieve and only remembered the happy times and the most important thing was to make sure the children were kept happy. I feel sure that your father would wish the same and I can assure you that you never forget but you always do remember the good times and have a smile to yourself, I do now even 20 years later. Remember the funny things your dad did and say to your children "Do you remember when grandad did........". There are of course times when you are going to cry, that is unavoidable and human nature, thank god,

I am sure that your father would not want you to have a morose Christmas, but would want you to raise your glasses 'to absent friends' and enjoy the occasion as normal as we all do on here. There is no guilt in feeling happy and your father would want to be the last one to put a brake on the occasion.

Kind regards

Ivan

Captain Kong
22nd December 2012, 09:44 AM
I am convinced that if I had not stopped smoking 23 and a half years ago I would be dead now.
I have just had a full medical and on blowing in the machine the computer said I had the lungs of a 60 year old, Not sure what that meant, 60 year old what?
But no problems there.
But I see a lot of people outside the hospital in dressing gowns, with a stand on a drip, and one lady last week had an Oxygen mask on with a small machine on the bench, pulling it down , having a puff on a ciggy , coughing and putting the Oxygen mask back on again. all of them smoking outside the main entrance from off the Wards,and most of them were women.
Now that is daft..
On the Financial side, , at todays prices for cigs I have saved the equivelant of over 55,000, and I can do a lot of travelling around the planet with the money I saved and invested.
So it has got to be good.
cheers.

Neville Roberts
22nd December 2012, 02:15 PM
while growning up in smokey Liverpool in the 30,s and 40,s with all the coal fires going gung hoe , I,m sure that many people got ill from just that . going too sea we had the freshest air on the planet .so maybe that helped us a bit ,even if we smoked , I smoked for 54 years and worked in the smoke filled restaurants of new york city for 21 years , we could smoke anywhere at that time .I even remember in the doctors office he had a large ash tray opn his desk filled with butts,and I have known a few people that never smoked that died of cancer ,and heart attacks . but gigarettes have become the black sheep now ,and seconhand smoke is touted a s bad as smoking ,I still would like a smoke now and then even after 5 years this march off them ,and even love the smell of them .eeek gorra go for a peice of( chewing gum chum) . thats what we used to say too the yanks in England during the war and after.:D

Keith Tindell
17th August 2013, 09:01 AM
Thinking back to the good old sea days, and smoking, which most of us did, why were we sold mostly American cigs, we did have senior service, but unless my memory is wrong, it was mainly lucky strike etc. was this down to profit?. Thankfully i no longer smoke, but just wondering KT

Ivan Cloherty
17th August 2013, 09:13 AM
Thinking back to the good old sea days, and smoking, which most of us did, why were we sold mostly American cigs, we did have senior service, but unless my memory is wrong, it was mainly lucky strike etc. was this down to profit?. Thankfully i no longer smoke, but just wondering KT

Profit may have something to do with it Keith, depended what run you were on, if the ship got the Bond in the Panama Canal then Lucky Strike and Camel were the cheapest to buy and the cheapest in the slop chest, and the American cigarettes were much favoured by the girls, customs and agents as payment for certain services. They found English cigarettes too strong for them. We always bought Senior Service for Paying Off as the girls back home didn't like the Yankee Doodle Ciggies

Captain Kong
17th August 2013, 09:35 AM
When I was with Cunard on the New York run, we always had a pack of Luckies or Chesterfield in the top pocket with the flip top. Flick the bottom and a ciggy would jump into the air and catch it tween the lips.
This used to impress the girls in the Locarno in Liverpool when we had a western ocean roll, a midnight blue suit from the Salvation Army in NY, $10 ex morgue, a tie from Tie City on Broadway, white socks and a mid Atlantic accent in the 50s. Great days of posing.
No one would be impressed today. But we had it all.
Cheers
Brian.

Don Rafferty
17th August 2013, 09:40 AM
I can remember when, mid to late '60s, the allowance for tipped and untipped cigarettes was messed around with.

The duty was paid on the tobacco content of the cigarette, so 200 Senior Service was considered to have the same amount of tobacco as the equivalent in Golden Virginia rolling tobacco, anyone with Rothmans, Benson and Hedges etc., were shortcharged on their limit and 220/240 were allowed.

Louis the Amigo
17th August 2013, 09:55 AM
Hi shipmates. The best came in tins players navy cut or was that rolling stuff. I have a few empty tins of it somewhere long ago they were used up, I allways smoked sweet afton an Irish brand, if I could get them? did not like the yankee ones, but the british ones were good. but I dont smoke anymore .

John Pruden
17th August 2013, 10:13 AM
some packs had a zippo lighter with them.jp

Captain Kong
17th August 2013, 10:15 AM
Hi John
I think you would find it a bit difficult to pose in the Locarno with that Electric ciggy you bought and tried to light.
Cheers
Brian.

John Pruden
17th August 2013, 10:24 AM
brian i will have to get a smoking jacket{like david niven}:p:pjp

Captain Kong
17th August 2013, 11:11 AM
I used to have a Smoking Jacket, John, I dropped a ciggy on it when I was bevied one night.
Brian.

Ivan Cloherty
17th August 2013, 12:31 PM
I used to have a Smoking Jacket, John, I dropped a ciggy on it when I was bevied one night.
Brian.

Presume it lived up to its name!!

Louis the Amigo
17th August 2013, 06:34 PM
Hi shipmates, I was waiting for a bus today and a young man came up to me and asked for a light? Without thinking I started to talk to him about the evils of smoking and how bad it is for you, I bet he was sorry he asked me !!! He had no lighter or matches hope he gives it up!!! I lost too many friends who smoked.

Keith at Tregenna
17th August 2013, 06:51 PM
Sadly lost a fair few that never smoked or drank: Committed to family and died young.

Tough either way really mate and they always take the good ones.

My wifey (nurse) only cares for those in the final stages of cancer and many that never smoked:

She will be home soon and my shoulder is ready for her tears.

K.

ray-c
17th August 2013, 07:05 PM
Use to smoke 60 a day, always had a fag hanging out of my mouth, then one summers day, I got a real nasty cold,
fags tasted like cows ****, and smelt like a farm yard, I had just bought my 60 for the day, I left a trail just lit fags, from Ashford Kent, to Oxford, what was left, went in the glove box, with lighter, and that's where they stayed, My car was never more than 30yds away, after 6mth I gave the lot to my sis in law, never touch another one since, that was 35yrs ago, never felt better, but put on a load of weight. sorry story but true. take care.:cool: