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Keith Tindell
18th August 2011, 09:39 AM
Hi, i sailed on the Stirling castle in the late 50,s for three trips as a deck boy, one trip i was a bridge boy (gofor), one trip as the PO,s peggy, and the final indignity deck boys peggy!!!, in those days if my memory is correct, we had 12-14 deckboys as crew, we had our own messroom and accomodation, 4-5 per cabin, and right up in the bows of the ship, right next to the chain locker. If i had high ideas of going to sea they were quickly crushed. eventually spent the next seven years at sea as AB, but for a young lad of seventeen the Stirling Castle was an ego buster. I wonder how many deck boys are on the modern passenger ships and what their duties are? Regards Keith Tindell

Ray McCerery
18th August 2011, 10:02 AM
Hi, i sailed on the Stirling castle in the late 50,s for three trips as a deck boy, one trip i was a bridge boy (gofor), one trip as the PO,s peggy, and the final indignity deck boys peggy!!!, in those days if my memory is correct, we had 12-14 deckboys as crew, we had our own messroom and accomodation, 4-5 per cabin, and right up in the bows of the ship, right next to the chain locker. If i had high ideas of going to sea they were quickly crushed. eventually spent the next seven years at sea as AB, but for a young lad of seventeen the Stirling Castle was an ego buster. I wonder how many deck boys are on the modern passenger ships and what their duties are? Regards Keith Tindell

I would imagine none, the deck crew are mainly Filipino and they will all be ABs.Different times now Keith unfortunately.:(

Doc Vernon
18th August 2011, 10:10 AM
Hello KEITH T
Dont know much about the Deck ,but sounds as though you werent at all happy on your first trips with the Sterling!
I served 3 Trips on her in 1958/59 as Asst Stwd and found her to be a great Ship! But that is of couse just my opinion haha!:)
Good days then!
Cheers

Capt Bill Davies
18th August 2011, 11:50 AM
Hi, i sailed on the Stirling castle in the late 50,s for three trips as a deck boy, one trip i was a bridge boy (gofor), one trip as the PO,s peggy, and the final indignity deck boys peggy!!!, in those days if my memory is correct, we had 12-14 deckboys as crew, we had our own messroom and accomodation, 4-5 per cabin, and right up in the bows of the ship, right next to the chain locker. If i had high ideas of going to sea they were quickly crushed. eventually spent the next seven years at sea as AB, but for a young lad of seventeen the Stirling Castle was an ego buster. I wonder how many deck boys are on the modern passenger ships and what their duties are? Regards Keith Tindell

Have no experience of passenger ships whatsoever Keith. My first trip as Deck Boy was on the Blue Funnel ship ‘Memnon’ in 1955. There were two Deck Boys onboard and we used to alternate the duties of POs peggy and Sailors peggy on a monthly basis. I was fortunate in that the crowd on that ship were excellent so it did not make much difference. I recall Capt Laxton was Master. The trip was 11 months in duration and I signed off as JOS.

Brgds

Bill

john sutton
18th August 2011, 04:43 PM
my first trip was on the capetown castle.Started off as PO,s peggy but was sacked as the skipper caught me doing a board of trade washup(throwing the crockery through the round locker)I was 15 at the time.Disrated to peggys peggy.
Many years later I used to go shooting with a retired General who was proud of the fact thet he had been a peggy before joining the army.When I told him that I had been a peggys peggy he was very impressed.
thre,s not many of us is there
john sutton

Keith Tindell
18th August 2011, 06:33 PM
Hi Vernon,
Times were not all hard on the Stirling, had some great times, as a 17 year old, grew up very quick, i remember going down into the galleys for the POs tab nabs( they were better than the seamans), and on the way out nicking rum ba ba,s from the first class pastry rack, was fine the first time, but the pastry chef was waiting the next time, caught red handed, he gave me such a clout , my ears were ringing for a couple of days, lesson learned, still not fond of rum ba ba,s to this day, best regards Keith Tindell

Terry Cadet
18th March 2013, 08:36 PM
Really that was part of a boy putting to sea my first voyage was a blessing at fourteen and half coming from a childrens home I was now a free spirit
I sailed with a old Scottish Skipper who one night while I was on Monkey Island lookout on the 12-4 watchhe came and stood along side me asked. ''Are a one tripper or was I going to make the sea your life?
That night he gave me two pieces of advice.
''Laddie, you can be like many of your fellow deckies they voyage the world and see it through the bottom of a beer glass and when they hang up their oilskins and retire to sit and write their story they will have seen little,but laddie, they will be able to tell how many beers they can buy for a dollar anywhere in the world.
"Or laddie you are or will become an observer thats what you are as you voyage around this world look listen and observe and when you come to hang up your well worn oilskins and write your life story believe me you will have seen much I took the latter advice now I write my stories as a log of my years in a great industry The British Merchant Navy.

Louis the Amigo
18th March 2013, 08:58 PM
hi shipmates, I was a peggy as a deck boy Thats where I learn to make proper mustard, for the crew mess was told I make the best many years later{another story} by a V.I.P. I remember doing a fry up for the crew on tank cleaning duties first trip and helping The cook in the galley all skills. I learned at sea as a boy . which have come very handy in life in many ways

Lou Barron
19th March 2013, 12:32 AM
I suppose there would no be many deck boys who did not have a turn at being the peggy .I did a couple of tmes in fact i was the peggythe night we got sunk i had just cleaned up in the messroom and joined a couple of the boys for a game of crib when the first shells hit us .

Colin Hawken
19th March 2013, 07:47 PM
I did my fiest trip on the Stirling Castle in 1949. The dreaded"Swiveleye Lloyd" was Chief Officer.Like all Deck Boys then I did my turn peggying. Bosun's Peggy,PO's Peggy but never got to be Boys Peggy. I did a year in her then did two trips on the Winchester Castle. She was a happy ship. Bosun was "Lardy"Perry. A rough diamond but a damn good Bosun.Things "Lardy" taught you,you never forgot. I still remember now and that's over sixty years ago. I finally realised Passenger Liners weren't for me. There followed an assortment of Tankers and other Tramps,finished up Home Trade. That was good fun,in the pub every couple of nights.I did a year on one of Stevie Clarks Colliers,the Hayling. She was a good ship.The only Ship I ever sailed on with single berth cabins.I was the only one that wasn't a Geordie. Took me a couple of weeks to understand the "Foreign language they spoke.after that it was great fun.:D

Terry Cadet
20th March 2013, 09:49 AM
Colin, Hi shipmate,seems like ten lifes ago sailing on the Cape boats under those two men,Lardy I will never forget his hat perched on the back of his round face strolling down the Prom deck as we sand and canvased the taff rails before breakfast.I agree they don't make Bosun's like that these days.
As for the Lloyd brother recall one time while docked in Durban we lads were over the side on stages painting ,when a family past underneath on the dockside,when we heard a scream a little girl had slipped and fallen into the dock.my mate dived off the paint stage and rescued her.
Later he was told by the Bosun's Mate to report to the bridge.
What happen was, he got logged by Swiveleyed Lloyd, think if I recall he got fined for swimming during working hours two days pay stopped something I will never forget.

Dave Howarth
1st February 2014, 02:39 PM
Similar story to mine, joined the Pendennis Castle as a deck boy in 1963 and was allocated "Chippys Peggy". As I had joined the Merchant Navy to be a "Sailor" I was rather disgruntled to find I was a galley waiter. My conduct on my first trip was not what it should have been which resulted in a double DR on my first trip. To cut a long story short I ended up as an oil field diver working on major international contracts. I am pleased to say that the training I received at Gravesend College stood me in good stead to be a diver, knots, rigging & general seamanship etc.,

I've been married for over 40 years, have 4 grand children 2 dogs and now retired in North Wales. I feel better now after waiting 51 years to get the above of my chest.

Cheers to all
Dave Howarth

Louis the Amigo
1st February 2014, 08:20 PM
Hi shipmates,was talking to my old mate Laurie about this subject, he was also a peggy/galley boy on his first trip to sea { wartime} he remembers peeling spuds/veg on poop deck all day, and helping the cook, do the burgoo for the crews breakfast in the mess room, he did not sign up for that? he job was in the engine room feeding boilers coal...

vic mcclymont
1st February 2014, 08:34 PM
Swivle eyedd Lloyd was one of the most humour less, divisive man that I have ever met
He was so full of his own self importance that he was unbelievable.

robpage
1st February 2014, 11:07 PM
Maybe Swivel eyed Lloyds mummy liked him , I have met a couple of ,mates who got on with him but I think it was a rare event , but , if my recollection is accurate the Lloyd brothers were both good friends with the donations they accrued for seamen s charities from a variety of their crewmen

j.sabourn
2nd February 2014, 12:21 AM
Swivel eye... seems hard to believe that one person should have such power of life and death over others, when according to reports he sounds like a psyhcopath an egocentric one at that. The old system of discharge book entries was misused in a lot of incidences. I was on one ship where out of a complement of 38 there were 18 double DRs. You cant tell me that 18 people were incompetent in their abilitys, they would not be able to work the ship in that case. The fines and forfeitures were there to try and maintain discipline, and the same as a shore worker in some cases no work no pay. However the Conduct and Ability discharges were to some a means of fear and bullying. I myself received one and I was the Chief Officer which was a Good for conduct on telling one owner and master where to put his ship. I altered myself in book, there was no way I was going to accept a lot of crap from such people, so to a certain extent I am in agreeance of some of the wrongs of the past system. The books after 70 were altered and there is now no place for comments, anyhow there is no where as far as I can see where to send the comments to. As to people overdrawn on payoff day and in debt to ship a lot that I sailed with resigned on again, and were soon back on the sub list. Cheers John S.

j.sabourn
2nd February 2014, 04:22 AM
# 12... Dave is real pity that you seem to have worried about your first trip. As we get older there is no need for any feelings of conscience. We all have had various experiences of such and similar things and on this site you will find many more. I know as a diver your whole routine is based on self discipline to yourself and others, and you may be trying to compare as against your experiences as a 16 year old. What you finish your working life as and what you accomplish during it is the case. It doesnt matter if you sweep the streets or an MP, it is your own satisfaction with yourself that is important. I feel sorry that you feel that you have carried what you may think of as a stigma for all those years. Believe me and others will tell you it is not. Cheers John Sabourn

cappy
2nd February 2014, 08:55 AM
#17 dave .....nothing wrong with starting at the start of any thing......we all have moments in life of disrespect for our selves ....not a man on this site could truthfully say otherwise.......if he does I will call him a liar to his face .......it is what we learn in life as we progress that makes us find our own destiny ......regardless of family or upbringing......how many on the site would have been strong enough to be a diver ......not many would shout I would......I am sure the other peggies on average would not have the bottle to be a diver.....bet yourgrand kids are proud of you like mine are proud of me... you have shown a true colour ...in sharing your thoughts ......that's a sighn of strength.......all power to you mate......regards cappy

happy daze john in oz
3rd February 2014, 05:38 AM
There were a number of UCL skippers that were a bit 'different' but not in the ususal UCL way.
The Lloyd brothers Logger and Swivel eye, like many others had been RN crew before joining UCL. They were hard men but had standards they thought all should live up to. SWivel eye with just the one would go on his rounds with 'Tiger' in tow carrying a silver salver with white gloves on. Swivel eye would use the gloves to test for dust on ledges such was his attention to detail.
On the Windsor we had Annie Oakley, the humpty back jumped up never come down son of a B*************. He had been RN and his ship sunk under him, as a result his spine was deformed making him walk in a manner of someone leaning over. He was the first to log me but he was not an unkind man. Story was that each year he would donate his wage for one voyage to the RN benevolent society As with the Lloyd brothers charitable societies were given assistance by them.
Then there was Granny Smythe on the Pretoria, another logging friend of mine, he also donated to the RN society for distressed sailors.
The engineering officers on the Windsor during my time saved silver foil to raise money for guide dogs. The foil was on many of the cig packets and it was removed by soaking the packets in water.
There were a number of senior crew who were charitable, unlike cheif Stewards who in my opinion had all been the sons of Scrooge.

j.sabourn
3rd February 2014, 06:54 AM
R.N. Discipiline... What my experience was that it was not as severe as that of the M.N. I worked as stated before for just over 4 years for the M.O.D. and was attached to Saturation Diving Teams. Maybe this part of the Navy were more leniently looked upon. However saw both RN officers as well as Ratings going off the tracks and their punishment being downright less severe than what a MN seaman would have received. However one always finds exception to the rules. Discipiline is discipiline and have no doubt the RN had its extroverts in this department also. The same as big ships and small ships in our time seemed to have a different attitude to the same, so would imagine the RN would also as regards different branches. Maybe swivel eye was ex Stores division, certainly hope he wasn't sailing on his cert. of Service. which I don't have too high a regard for. Cheers John S.

robpage
3rd February 2014, 07:00 AM
If you go to http://www.unioncastlestaffregister.co.uk/SHIPMATES_LLOYD_NORMAN_01.html there is an interesting article on Norman Lloyd there

j.sabourn
3rd February 2014, 07:36 AM
Rob... The orbituary or whatever it is, is written it seems by an impressionable youngster who obviously looked up to the Master and so be it good for him, on such statements epic stories are made. His signalling prowess with the Aldis if can be believed was excellent. Most Naval Officers cant even use. For those off the deck know a warship will always call you up at slow speed until he sees what speed you answer and will always maintain your speed, as the naval signaller that is his profession and can send as fast as possible and could really compete with an old time Radio Operator. 6 words a minute was the standard for the MN and 8 words for semaphore. A naval signaller could go up to 14 words no bother I am told by an ex Kiwi Naval Yeoman. Maybe The person being discussed may of been out of this branch of the Navy, the same as Mountbatten who was in communications and finished up as Admiral of the Fleet. Regards John S.

robpage
3rd February 2014, 09:21 AM
I knew of the Lloyd brothers , and never heard a likable word for either of them , but I never sailed with them , Out of all the stories , I think any one would agree that they had very high standards , the reason I put the link in was to giove a better balance to the opinions there is an article here on G W Lloyd the other one known as " Logger " Lloyd http://unioncastlestaffregister.co.uk/SHIPMATES_LLOYD_G_W_B_01.html . I think both these stories illustrate that despite the outward aggressiveness , that there was a man behind the facade . I know several catering guys who disliked the Lloyds intensely , but I believe they were old school , firm but firm , men , were not paid by the company for their popularity

j.sabourn
3rd February 2014, 09:41 AM
I must have either misread this post or am referring to another. I thought the Brothers being discussed were Ex. Navy. Sorry for any misconceptions that have arose. Cheers John S.

Keith Tindell
3rd February 2014, 09:59 AM
The three trips that i did on the Stirling Castle was with *Annie* Oakley as skipper, and the use of the lead line must have been standard bull**** for the passengers, because the only time i ever saw the lead line being used from the chains, was as we entered the anchorage in Maderia outbound, this was on each trip. All that time i was at sea school learning all the markings was a waste of time, certainly of no use as a peggy!. KT

Chris Isaac
3rd February 2014, 10:58 AM
I knew of the Lloyd brothers , and never heard a likable word for either of them , but I never sailed with them , Out of all the stories , I think any one would agree that they had very high standards , the reason I put the link in was to giove a better balance to the opinions there is an article here on G W Lloyd the other one known as " Logger " Lloyd http://unioncastlestaffregister.co.uk/SHIPMATES_LLOYD_G_W_B_01.html . I think both these stories illustrate that despite the outward aggressiveness , that there was a man behind the facade . I know several catering guys who disliked the Lloyds intensely , but I believe they were old school , firm but firm , men , were not paid by the company for their popularity

They were not brothers

Logger here: http://www.bandcstaffregister.co.uk/page1397.html
Swiv here: http://www.bandcstaffregister.co.uk/page1398.html

robpage
3rd February 2014, 11:04 AM
Thanks for that Chris ., I was not sure , but I had it in mind that they were related , another Urban Legend busted

happy daze john in oz
4th February 2014, 04:33 AM
my first trip was on the capetown castle.Started off as PO,s peggy but was sacked as the skipper caught me doing a board of trade washup(throwing the crockery through the round locker)I was 15 at the time.Disrated to peggys peggy.
Many years later I used to go shooting with a retired General who was proud of the fact thet he had been a peggy before joining the army.When I told him that I had been a peggys peggy he was very impressed.
thre,s not many of us is there
john sutton

BOT wash up, a practice carried out by many UCL stewards. There must be enouch china and silver under the sea between Southampton and the Cape to stock a thousand or more hotels.